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Old 04-10-2020, 12:14 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Default Geometry - Helix (Helicoid)

From Wikipedia:


"Helix
A helix, plural helixes or helices, is a shape like a corkscrew or spiral staircase. It is a type of smooth space curve with tangent lines at a constant angle to a fixed axis. Helices are important in biology, as the DNA molecule is formed as two intertwined helices, and many proteins have helical substructures, known as alpha helices. The word helix comes from the Greek word ἕλιξ, "twisted, curved".
(A "filled-in" helix for example, a "spiral" ramp is called a helicoid.)"


DNA - single

helical.jpg
DNA - double

DNA_double_helix-.jpg



"Alpha Helix"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpha_helix


"Archimedes screw" shown in operation
http://www.incois.gov.in/Tutor/scien...re10/screw.gif

Auger
auger.jpg

HELICOID

EJDYW0.jpg

P1030993 copy.jpg

CCDM2N.jpg


Helicoid - Spiral stair:
The designer developed his stair section, thus:
Flighted substrate.jpg
Made the shape into a heavy wood mock-up, maquette or "buck."
2X6 + 1in ply glued and screwed, then CNC milled in appropriate router-machine:
AP1110691 copy.jpg


And with some hammering here and there .... boom - whacka-whacka ....
P1030882c.jpg
Attached Images
File Type: jpg external-content.duckduckgo.com.jpg (62.4 KB, 22 views)
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Last edited by crystallographic; 04-10-2020 at 05:43 PM.
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Old 04-10-2020, 03:52 PM
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RatRockx RatRockx is offline
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The front side of this lectern has a helix shape. When I made it I found that it is pretty much a reverse. If you stretched one side in a wheel you would rotate the panel 180 degs and stretch the other side. For a helix you flip the panel so that it's rotated and upside down. Pull up a bit while wheeling and you'll get a helix.


IMG_20200410_224252.jpg
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Last edited by RatRockx; 04-10-2020 at 04:58 PM.
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Old 04-10-2020, 05:55 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Originally Posted by RatRockx View Post





The front side of this lectern has a helix shape. When I made it I found that it is pretty much a reverse. If you stretched one side in a wheel you would rotate the panel 180 degs and stretch the other side. For a helix you flip the panel so that it's rotated and upside down. Pull up a bit while wheeling and you'll get a helix.
Attachment 56049

Jo Joris,

Ja, I sure had to know more about linear shaping to put this job in a twist.

But this was not quite like other familiar reverse weirdness .....


weird reverse.jpg
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Old 04-10-2020, 08:21 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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In the beginning ...
I had to grasp the nature of a shaped panel that twisted.
P1030993.jpg
And yet remained flat ...

So, the panel started out flat. This part was easy.
P1030050 copy.jpg
I laid out my lines of shape, and I made a plan.
P1030237 copy.jpg
And I worked my plan.
P1030205 copy.jpg
And I stuck to my plan
P1030335 copy.jpg
Check fit.

hammer hammer ....

Check fit
P1030343 copy.jpg
...and so on .....

... not there yet ....
Attached Images
File Type: jpg P1030226 copy.jpg (47.7 KB, 62 views)
File Type: jpg P1030291 copy.jpg (55.5 KB, 62 views)
File Type: jpg P1030333 copy.jpg (40.9 KB, 10 views)
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Last edited by crystallographic; 04-11-2020 at 01:37 PM.
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Old 04-11-2020, 03:19 AM
metal manny metal manny is offline
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Fascinating work there, Kent. Definitely not an 'everyday' job!

Did the sheet stiffen up some as the shape was induced? Also, did the final product need to be smoothed, and if so, how did you planish, or intend planishing, all the little hammer marks?
TX
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Old 04-11-2020, 01:55 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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No Manny, not an everyday job - except when it happens everyday .... for weeks on end ...
P1030333 copy.jpg


P1030317copy.jpg


P1030439copy.jpg


P1030444 copy.jpg


P1030451 copy.jpg


P1030315 copy.jpg



P1030572 C.jpg

When the shape wilds the panel sandbags are used to calm things down.
P1030455 copy.jpg
Yes, the 1.5mm (.063) steel hardens with hours of hammering.

And yes the panel flip-flops quickly ... snapping hard enough to bite unwary fingers.
Yes, it is a fight to push-pull the 40 lb 20sq. ft panels forth and back, accurately - with the added weight of the bags ...

and with all that the panel has to be physically twisted to align nicely with the dies when hammering .....
Oh ... planishing ... yeah I have die sets for that sweetness ...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg P1030481 copy.jpg (44.2 KB, 20 views)
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Last edited by crystallographic; 04-11-2020 at 02:04 PM.
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Old 04-14-2020, 04:19 AM
touringgarage touringgarage is offline
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this is absolute world class.
end of the flagpole
incredible
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Old 04-14-2020, 11:41 AM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Originally Posted by touringgarage View Post
this is absolute world class.
end of the flagpole
incredible

Vielen dank, Bernhard!
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Old 04-14-2020, 01:02 PM
drivejunk drivejunk is offline
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While the geometry lesson may be lost on me, the ability to think (and work) big is obvious and impressive. Not to mention... that just looks like hard work!

Interesting. Looks good.
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Old 04-14-2020, 07:50 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drivejunk View Post
While the geometry lesson may be lost on me, the ability to think (and work) big is obvious and impressive. Not to mention... that just looks like hard work!

Interesting. Looks good.

Thanks Matt.
It feels like hard work, too.


Planishing "seasick" contours ... was a challenge.

P1030455 copy.jpg
Had to come up with a "sailor" die set.

P1030436c.jpg
Something that can sail smoothly across the waves ...
P1040016c.jpg
Navigating rough spots ...

P1040008c.jpg
smooth sailing ...
P1040011copy.jpg
And so I modified one of our #6 air motors to hit softly ...
P1030463copy.jpg
and it changes out in a few seconds, uses the same air pressure, and on we go ...
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"All it takes is a little practical experience to blow the he!! out of a perfectly good theory." --- Lloyd Rosenquist, charter member AWS, 1919.
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