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Old 03-27-2016, 06:03 PM
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Jere Jere is offline
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Default Diamond Wheel

I am looking to buy a diamond wheel for my tool bit grinder. McMaster offers them in 100, 180, and 320 grit. Which one would you suggest.

Jere
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Old 03-27-2016, 07:54 PM
Ken Hosford Ken Hosford is offline
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To remove stock you want coarse to mirror polish, fine . Are you aware not to grind steel it will trash the diamonds . If I was to buy only 1 it would be 180 . If you have a Chinese grinder the bolt pattern may be off and axle diameter off I bought 2 different Chinese tool grinders and the diamond wheels had slightly different bolt pattern with flat heads slotting did not seem good idea.so I re drilled the flanges and tried to true up on loose axles .

Last edited by Ken Hosford; 03-27-2016 at 08:00 PM. Reason: more info
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Old 03-28-2016, 06:21 AM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jere View Post
I am looking to buy a diamond wheel for my tool bit grinder. McMaster offers them in 100, 180, and 320 grit. Which one would you suggest.

Jere
What are you typically grinding, Jere- HSS, Carbide or a variety of materials? Do you need a specific profile or will a square face suit your needs?
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Old 03-28-2016, 08:13 AM
custommetal custommetal is offline
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Check out this company.....http://www.wttool.com.....I've bought stuff from them over the years and it's good quality at a reasonable price. Since a lot of tooling is made in China anyway, even private label, it may be worth looking into. I have a diamond wheel made for a standard surface grinder, 1 1/4 dia mounting hole, so made an adapter hub that fits a 5/8 dia shaft motor. I think it is around 120 grit. I finish the carbide edge with a diamond whetstone. I'm a mold maker so used to hand finishing.

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Old 03-28-2016, 12:14 PM
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Thank you to all.

I want to sharpen my carbide tool bits and create different profiles. I want to have a regular stone on one end and a diamond on the other. Since the HF grinder I have has forward and reverse I can grind both sides of the bit.

When you grind a carbide lathe tool, do you remove the body of the bit beneath the carbide on the regular stone and then grind only the carbide portion on the diamond so as not to harm the diamond with the body of the bit?

I am not afraid of hole pattern as I have made several adapters for mounting several different types of stones to different machines that they were not meant to be mounted to.

Thanks again for your input. This is the most informative sight ever, thanks to the people like you.

Jere
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Old 03-28-2016, 12:51 PM
bobadame bobadame is offline
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There are these for roughing out carbide.

https://www.zoro.com/norton-grinding...B&gclsrc=aw.ds

Then finish grind with 180 diamond.
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Old 03-28-2016, 01:18 PM
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Thanks Bob. I have bin using the green wheel for 30 or so years and want to be able to use the table on the tool grinder to get a more precised angle on the finished tool.

I have ground all my tools by hand since the 60's and I can't figure out why I want to do something different now. I bought a Drill Doctor about 15 years ago and used it once and gave it to my son.

I have bin giving it a lot of thought lately and getting older isn't working out for me. I think I'll just stay at 50 for a while and see how that works.

Jere
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Old 03-28-2016, 05:44 PM
steel3window steel3window is offline
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I spent 20+ years building carbide tooling from scratch (designing, machining bodies, soldering on carbide, profiling, and sharpening) for Bentwood Furniture.

There are many different ways to grind Carbide, but I always had the best success using diamond with a water/coolant solution running on it to reduce heat, as rapid cooling after intense heat causes small fractures that can travel that are in effect the "dullness" that is experienced.

Along with grit, there is a concentration rating for diamond wheels. Basically a low concentration of 320 grit can potentially cut faster and with a better finish than a high concentration of 100 grit, or vice versa.

Unfortunately, the rating (hardness) of the carbide (C-1, C-2, C-3, Etc...) and whether you are grinding, or cutting (sharpening, OR Profiling) wet or dry, greatly dictates the "best" grit and concentration.

I will see if I happen to have kept the contact, and research info I had on the diamond wheels I used (it's been so long, that I can't recall) and post it.
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Old 03-28-2016, 06:08 PM
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Thanks Brian. I ordered the diamond wheel from McMaster this morning. I am getting the 180 and it should be here Wednesday.

I didn't know if I should run water on it or not, so thanks for that.

Should I still grind the profile I'm after by hand on the green wheel and finish off with the diamond? I don't want to ruin the diamond by loading it up with the backing material.

Jere
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Old 03-28-2016, 06:30 PM
steel3window steel3window is offline
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Jere,

I see you already ordered, but for information's sake, here's what I have;


Nearly everything I used had C-2 carbide on it.

I was using a D320 100B (320 grit 100 concentration wheel for facing (sharpening) the carbide. and D120 75B for creating the profile

My supplier was;

US Diamond Wheel
101 Kendall Point Drive
Oswego, IL 60543
Phone: (630) 898-9000


I would suggest "roughing" out the shape with the green wheel. Be aware of how it is affecting or fracturing the carbide. You may have to rough it close, and finish with the diamond wheel, or rough it farther away than you'd think. I usually only left .030-.050" from the back of the carbide to the steel backing. With .030-.035" relief across the .125" carbide when measured rotationally. (I hope that makes sense) and be aware, I was creating 2 or more wing tools for cutting hardwoods.

For use on lathe tooling (I'm guessing for machining steel), the steel can likely back up the carbide transition directly from the carbide the steel.

Also be aware that sometimes the bonding agent used to hold the diamond to itself and the wheel can break down quite rapidly when used against steel and create irregular shapes quite rapidly. Definitely something to pay attention to as you grind.

There are "cleaner" sticks (usually about 1/2x1/2x6") that can be used to "clean" the diamond also. They are akin to "sandpaper erasers" used to clean gummed up sandpaper on a edge sander and such.


Everything will probably be trial and error, but best of luck!
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