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  #11  
Old 04-03-2020, 07:32 PM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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Looks good, Manny- especially the reminder to remember/record the plot point in reference to the square profile material used for the buck.
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  #12  
Old 04-04-2020, 04:22 AM
metal manny metal manny is offline
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Kent, thanks a ton for taking such trouble to share your knowledge.
Splitting the body along the "waterline" is a good solution, and would definitely work in my case - particularly for the rear section. The rocker panels are seamed as separate from the door lines, so here's my 'out-of-jail' card with ready in-built equator!

Do you think that splitting the car this way is performed by first shaping, say a complete fender, and then splitting it along the "equator", or shaping in 2 separate halves?
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  #13  
Old 04-04-2020, 04:27 AM
metal manny metal manny is offline
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Originally Posted by cliffrod View Post
Looks good, Manny- especially the reminder to remember/record the plot point in reference to the square profile material used for the buck.

Thanks, AC. I guess that's why most steel 'wire-frame' bucks use round bar instead? In my buck, although I used square bar predominantly, I did also use round and flat, and also varying thicknesses, where it suited best.
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  #14  
Old 04-04-2020, 08:46 AM
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Steve Hamilton Steve Hamilton is offline
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Manny
Your buck is a work of art in itself.
Very well thought out process to gather and transfer accurate information. Thanks for posting such a detailed story and pictures.
Looking forward to seeing more on this project.

Steve
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  #15  
Old 04-04-2020, 09:27 AM
daveb daveb is offline
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Unbelievable job on that buck. Iím looking forward to the build
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  #16  
Old 04-04-2020, 12:01 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metal manny View Post
Kent, thanks a ton for taking such trouble to share your knowledge.
Splitting the body along the "waterline" is a good solution, and would definitely work in my case - particularly for the rear section. The rocker panels are seamed as separate from the door lines, so here's my 'out-of-jail' card with ready in-built equator!

Do you think that splitting the car this way is performed by first shaping, say a complete fender, and then splitting it along the "equator", or shaping in 2 separate halves?

First off Manny, You just build the top "half" using the equator as your stop point - unless a panel has the natural "want to go full" nature built in. Usually not, though.
The old envelope body cars are built as "front skin" - "rear skin" - lids - doors (unless only one ) and sometimes rockers are separate.


This old wreck has a center section that wraps and then flanges down against the frame tubes.
OSCA Sebring Spyder _open_C .jpg
Funny thing, the design allows for first releasing the fasteners on the section, and then two guys "spring" it open a bit and go forward or rearward to get it off and on the chassis. The two tilt-aways are framed up with light tubing and steel flanges -for rivets (very typical = many cars + many countries).
But the buck is still a single piece (3 - 6 of these cars made) so the skins are made and then set up when joined in larger sections and then fit to the chassis. These larger sections then become the "masters" and the subsequent "minor" panels are then joined, and also fit to the chassis.
It all makes wonderful logic when you take one apart, clean it up, repair the chassis, and replace whatever sections are needed, whilst fitting all back together.


Chassis gets a full rework (main tubes replaced ++++ etc) on this old wreck.
Kustom chassis table made from heavy drive shaft tubes + misc plate, tube - BOLTS to floor. accurate to +-.015" - (we use jacks and chains with this table, but it is moveable + STRONG)
718 RSK_0030) chassis start C.jpg
Finished wreck going to Museum collection, then sold.
718 RSK_0030) final C.jpg


(Ratty old race car resto....)
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  #17  
Old 04-06-2020, 12:24 AM
metal manny metal manny is offline
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Steve, Dave- thanks


Kent thanks again, now I understand.

Naturally, one wishes to pre-think and pre-empt all the pitfalls, both big and small. And although I haven't foreseen every possible setback, I'm pretty sure that by the time I near completion, I'll be a lot more clued up than I am at present! Thanks for your insight.
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  #18  
Old 04-06-2020, 03:55 PM
Bevelhead Bevelhead is offline
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Beautiful buck.

Taking the measurements of the original is time consuming but getting alignment of all the stations of the buck when welding up would be the real challenge.

Looks fantastic.........
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