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  #11  
Old 09-14-2021, 06:44 AM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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Very cool. Looks great. Thanks for posting, Nate.
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  #12  
Old 09-14-2021, 07:19 AM
Nate S Nate S is offline
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Thanks everyone! I'm going to test a section and see how polishing goes. I am assuming there's no real magic to it?? Just use finer and finer paper before moving to polish. Any tips or tricks? Or just good old fashioned elbow grease haha?
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  #13  
Old 09-15-2021, 05:01 AM
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Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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That is turning out really well. It has already taught you most shapes you will need to do in the future.
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  #14  
Old 09-15-2021, 01:30 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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" I'm going to test a section and see how polishing goes. "
.................................................. .........................................

Very nice project, Nate.
Good shapes and your wheel looks like it is making good true surfaces.


Polishing? That will be an .edu.
"Do not touch" usually follows.


I'd recommend something reasonable and effective for this job:
maroon scrub pads soaked with 70% isopropyl - applied with elbow grease.


You may actually like the surface afterwards - and it is easy to blend, along with usage happening.

P1110515 copy.jpg
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  #15  
Old 09-16-2021, 07:39 AM
Nate S Nate S is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystallographic View Post
" I'm going to test a section and see how polishing goes. "
.................................................. .........................................

Very nice project, Nate.
Good shapes and your wheel looks like it is making good true surfaces.


Polishing? That will be an .edu.
"Do not touch" usually follows.


I'd recommend something reasonable and effective for this job:
maroon scrub pads soaked with 70% isopropyl - applied with elbow grease.


You may actually like the surface afterwards - and it is easy to blend, along with usage happening.

Attachment 61353
Wow, I honestly didn't know you could get that kind of a finish by hand! I thought my only options were polished, brushed (ie linear scratches), or painted. Something to consider, thank you!
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  #16  
Old 09-16-2021, 03:14 PM
Overkill Overkill is offline
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Default Polishing

Working on aluminum tear drop trailers, vintage cast items and epoxy counter tops, I've found some things work, some don't. This is the bar top I maintain
https://mountainhouseestate.com/mend...ery/#iLightbox[gallery_image_4]/14

Take a look at www.perfectpolish.com. There's video there to help understand the techniques they use. You can accomplish the polished surface without the Cyclo polisher, but they are worth the investment if doing large trailers or airplanes.

I have found that using a random orbital (DA) sander will cause problems, no matter what how fine the grit. The circular micro scratches a DA leaves will not allow the polished surface to reflect the light as desired. This is remedied by simply using a sander that sands in a linear direction. This problem was more pronounced on the epoxy and cast aluminum than 5052 aluminum sheet.

After getting it sanded, you change to different grits of polish, using the advice of your favorite brands. I've used multiple, and they all work about the same in the end.

To get perfectly aligned linear scratches a friend of mine used an Eastwood Contour SCT https://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-contour-sct.html on his mini teardrop that he pulls behind his motorcycle. You go one direction only, and have to keep it all perfectly parallel to have it look right in the end. I plan on using a device like this next time I polish out the bar tops.

Personally, I'd recommend Kent's solution, as it's repairable.
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  #17  
Old 09-17-2021, 04:11 PM
Kustomizer Kustomizer is offline
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Default useful tool

Make one of these from a jitterbug sander, I use them with Harbor freight sanding pads and you can wrap said maroon pads over a sanding pad and take most of the labor out of the finishing, the sponge allows easy contouring.


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Last edited by Kustomizer; 09-17-2021 at 04:13 PM.
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  #18  
Old 09-18-2021, 01:35 PM
Nate S Nate S is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Overkill View Post
Working on aluminum tear drop trailers, vintage cast items and epoxy counter tops, I've found some things work, some don't. This is the bar top I maintain
https://mountainhouseestate.com/mend...ery/#iLightbox[gallery_image_4]/14

Take a look at www.perfectpolish.com. There's video there to help understand the techniques they use. You can accomplish the polished surface without the Cyclo polisher, but they are worth the investment if doing large trailers or airplanes.

I have found that using a random orbital (DA) sander will cause problems, no matter what how fine the grit. The circular micro scratches a DA leaves will not allow the polished surface to reflect the light as desired. This is remedied by simply using a sander that sands in a linear direction. This problem was more pronounced on the epoxy and cast aluminum than 5052 aluminum sheet.

After getting it sanded, you change to different grits of polish, using the advice of your favorite brands. I've used multiple, and they all work about the same in the end.

To get perfectly aligned linear scratches a friend of mine used an Eastwood Contour SCT https://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-contour-sct.html on his mini teardrop that he pulls behind his motorcycle. You go one direction only, and have to keep it all perfectly parallel to have it look right in the end. I plan on using a device like this next time I polish out the bar tops.

Personally, I'd recommend Kent's solution, as it's repairable.
That's some really good info! I have seen the SCT and I've been looking for a reason to buy one
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  #19  
Old 09-18-2021, 01:38 PM
Nate S Nate S is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kustomizer View Post
Make one of these from a jitterbug sander, I use them with Harbor freight sanding pads and you can wrap said maroon pads over a sanding pad and take most of the labor out of the finishing, the sponge allows easy contouring.


Oh good idea! As get get more into metal shaping its obvious I need to invest in a variety of sanders lol
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  #20  
Old 09-20-2021, 07:02 PM
Overkill Overkill is offline
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Default Eastwood SCT

Nate,

For polishing my bar top epoxy bar tops I have purchased a Buffpro polisher, but I have yet to test it out. What I liked about the product was the linear polishing, similar to the SCT, so that swirls aren't an issue. But it uses a slower speed, wider wheel, and has the handles in a better position for polishing.

https://buffpro.com/?gclid=CjwKCAjw4...RoCSuQQAvD_BwE

One of these days I'll give it a try on aluminum.
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