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Old 06-03-2022, 11:39 PM
Mr fixit Mr fixit is online now
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Default Brass tubing forming help.

Hi Group,

I need to make some brass tubing ferrules 1/4" OD x 4" long that look like the attached picture. These are going to be drain line sleeves for a woody car that has rear sliding windows that run in a channel on top of the wood frame of the car that I'm restoring.

ferrule.JPG

window channel.JPG

I haven't measured the tubing wall thickness, but it's pretty thin, so I think it will form, but I need some suggestions as to how to go about it.

I can make a mandrel or some other shape but I"m unsure how to get started.

Hope someone can share an idea or two..

TX
Mr fixit
Chris

Last edited by galooph; 06-04-2022 at 03:14 AM.
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Old 06-04-2022, 12:43 AM
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Mark Fox Mark Fox is online now
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You could get 1/4” or 6 mm tube from a model making shop.
And just use a flair ring tool, the kind you use for brake lines.
I think that would be the easiest way.
I’ve just looked up a local model shop here in Melbourne. It’s $12.95 AUD for a 36 inch length.
1/4 by .014 wall thickness.
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Last edited by Mark Fox; 06-04-2022 at 12:53 AM.
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Old 06-04-2022, 03:53 AM
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Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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As Mark suggested exactly.
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Old 06-04-2022, 05:13 AM
Jaroslav Jaroslav is offline
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As colleagues say. Similar tools have been used for tubes for industrial cooling. Brass, if heated and cooled, will soften very much. Then can you widen the tube with any tool in the vice? You make a cube with a hole, you cut it in two halves and you have a clamping sleeve. You clamp the pipe and tap through the conical tool into the clamped pipe. The tool must have the same cone as the cone prepared at the edge of the hole behind which it is clamped.
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Old 06-04-2022, 10:20 AM
Marc Bourget Marc Bourget is offline
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If the quantity needed is sufficient for the set up . . .



Lathe with collett closer. Flared orming tool in tail stock mounted drill chuck.


Tubing in collett, anneal extension and run the "oiled" forming tool into the tube
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Old 06-04-2022, 01:00 PM
Mr fixit Mr fixit is online now
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Hi Guys,

I new you would come through for me. What a simple suggestion of the flaring tool. Didn't even consider it but I have it sitting right here on the bench because I just finished a complete brake system rebuild, so I'm ready to go.

Marc, I do have a metal lathe and could do as you suggested, but sincec the flaring tool is out and I only have to make 10 of them It's going to be just as easy with the tools already on hand, but it's a great suggestion that I will keep in mind for the future.

Mark I did just that, I went to the hobby store and got the 1/4" tube there. I didn't check the wall thickness but that sounds about right.

Again all I can sasy is you guys and this site are the best...!!

TX
Mr fixit
Chris
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Old 06-07-2022, 07:59 AM
billfunk29 billfunk29 is offline
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Default Butted tube

I have resorted to butting the tube, to prevent getting too thin or splitting. Since you have a lathe, you can make a butting tool. Basically hammering the end of the tube to make it thicker.
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