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  #291  
Old 08-20-2020, 05:35 PM
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heinke heinke is offline
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Post Door Jambs (cont.)

The focus moved to the door jamb at the rear of the door. For this one, I needed to do a cardboard mockup. I find cardboard from breakfast cereal boxes works well for this.



Iíve chosen to attach the rubber weather seal to the door frame instead of the door jamb. To ensure a good seal in the door latch area the seal will need to be positioned so it will clear the striker bolt. Thus the door jamb needs to have a sealing surface above the top of striker bolt. In addition, the door jamb needs to be bowed more vertical above the striker bolt and I mocked this up with a scrap of aluminum sheet.

To build the jamb in aluminum, I started with a 24Ē section having the same channel profile as the lower door sill. To add the curve for the bowed area, I cut the channel section top and back side out and then used a shrinker on the channel front side upward pointing edge until the desired curve was present. I bent up another channel shaped section, welded it on top and then metal finished it.







For now, the rear door jamb is held in place with only the striker bolt. I wonít weld it to the door sill until a later step. I want to keep the door jamb in a workable size until I figure out how best to flow it into the outer body skin.
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  #292  
Old 08-23-2020, 06:04 PM
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Post Door Jambs (cont.)

The lower front door jamb is now sorted out. This area took some very precise templating and bends for the necessary fit. Itís the part of the door jamb that seals off and thus will be attached to the donor C4 cowl/door post. Here it is in the as welded state.



I did elect to TIG weld these pieces and paid for it with one small crack that arose during metal finishing. I guess I should have broken out the O/A torch for the welds.

Here it is after metal finishing and in situ.



At first I was thinking it would be best to continue building out the passenger side door jamb up and into the windshield frame. But I think Iíll jump over to the drivers side and repeat what Iíve done for the door sill and jambs while itís still fresh in my mind.
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  #293  
Old 09-01-2020, 08:05 PM
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heinke heinke is offline
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Post Door Jambs (cont.)

Iím back to working on the passenger side door jamb now. I repeated all the previous steps to catch up the build out on the drivers door jamb since the last update.

This update is about making the front door jamb sheet metal. Iíve found out the time to form a piece of sheet metal into the desired shape is only loosely related to its size. In this case, I have a fairly small sized piece but with some complicated bends/shape so it took a couple of days to make. Of course making the second one will go much faster now that I know how to do it. To make this piece, I had to make 2 sets of hammer forms, anneal the metal 4 separate times and do the bends with a flow forming tool.



Hereís the first hammer form with the first bend already made. The TM Tech flow forming tool is sitting on the workbench. The second hammer form uses half of the first hammer form and enabled me to put a curved ďz ď bend into the metal. Hereís the metal ready for the 3rd annealing prior to the next bend.



And the 3rd bend, a simple 90 degree bend, now flow formed in.



Hereís the piece in situ after the last bends are completed.



Now youíre probably asking, ďWhy were all the complicated bends required?Ē In order to use the rubber weather stripping from the C4 Corvette, I had to pretty much duplicate how it was done for that car, but without the luxury of having large presses to pressure form the complicated shapes.

Here it is with a rubber windlass in place which is just part of that nice factory designed weather stripping.



Given the complicated process to make this piece, I think Iíll make the related one for the drivers side door jamb before moving forward on the passenger side door jamb.
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  #294  
Old 09-02-2020, 05:00 AM
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Very nice result after all that work.
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  #295  
Old 09-02-2020, 11:34 AM
Sprint Relic Sprint Relic is offline
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"Iíve found out the time to form a piece of sheet metal into the desired shape is only loosely related to its size."

Amen to that.
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  #296  
Old 09-02-2020, 11:36 AM
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Steve Hamilton Steve Hamilton is offline
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hi Joel

very nicely done!

much more thought and planning is required than first meets the eye. Nice that you can make use of the original weather strips.

Steve
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  #297  
Old 09-02-2020, 11:46 AM
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123pugsy 123pugsy is offline
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Nice. My brain just doesn't have metal shaping built in. How did you do the second bend?
And why is the piece not flim flamming all over the place?
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  #298  
Old 09-03-2020, 07:56 PM
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heinke heinke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 123pugsy View Post
Nice. My brain just doesn't have metal shaping built in. How did you do the second bend?
And why is the piece not flim flamming all over the place?
Ok, here's a picture of the hammer forms and the plastic piece from the C4 Corvette that I'm using as a guide for the required shapes. The blue masking tape marks the bottom of the piece I just made.



The hammer forms are all 1/2" plywood made from scraps left over from the station buck. The bottom two were used for the first bend and the top two were added to one from bottom set for the second part of the curved "z" bend. 1/4" bolts were used to hold the pieces of plywood together and index the sheet to keep it from moving during forming operations.

Now to answer the question about how waves and distortion were prevented in the final piece. The simple answer is that all waves and distortions were removed after each forming stage such that they did not get trapped into the nooks and crannies.

There certainly were a few ruffles after each of the first two forming steps given the curved nature of the bends. Because the bends were flow formed, I had more control over where the extra metal ended up than if the bends would have been forced in with a single push/blow. I kept the ruffles somewhat spread apart so there were several small ones versus a single large hump of extra metal.

I then used my TM Tech pneumatic power hammer to flatten the ruffles and thus get back to a non-distorted shape. The previously annealed metal had work hardened some during forming but was still soft enough to be flattened. For the upper die, I used a "hard metal" shrinking die and a flanging die for the lower. Both these dies have the same type of metal on their contact surfaces which are flat. While you'd think that hitting aluminum sheet between two metal dies should cause stretch, these dies actually shrink the ruffles out. I asked Kent White one time what metal he used in making these particular dies, he just grinned at me and said, "It's a very useful space age metal with a property that it 'grabs' other metal when it contacts it and thus invokes a shrink instead of stretch." That's all I could get out of him.

After the first two bends, all the rest were straight 90 degree bends. So once the distortion was removed after the first two bends, the remaining bends didn't added any new distortion.

As you can see from the plastic Corvette piece, I still have plenty of challenge in figuring out how to make the topmost area in aluminum. I think the smart move will be to simplify it down some by focusing on weather strip sealing surfaces only and not replicating all those complicated angles and curves.
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  #299  
Old 09-04-2020, 05:55 AM
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123pugsy 123pugsy is offline
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Thanks Joel.


You really have your work cut out for you to match the rest of it.
Great job of it thus far.
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  #300  
Old 09-05-2020, 06:55 PM
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heinke heinke is offline
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Post Door Jambs (cont.)

Iím making the last couple of extraneous pieces to finish up the passenger side lower door jamb. Chevrolet designed the C4 passenger side door post with a pinch weld oriented to the outside of the car where on the drivers side itís oriented to the front to the car. Given this outward orientation, I was left with a small hole in the sheet metal that should be sealing off the door post forward of the door hinges.



While the hole is only about 1Ē square, itís complicated by elevation changes around the edges. I said what the heck, letís try to fill it from a single piece of sheet. Once I had made a cardboard template, the sheet is only 3 ĹĒ by 1 ĺĒ but it takes an origami like state of mind to form it. After folding, hammering and generally coercing six 90 degree bends into the small sheet and 2 small welds later, hereís the result.



This example really underscores the notion that the size of the piece is only loosely associated with the time it takes to make it. I still need to weld the piece into the surrounding metal, but the challenging origami like process is done.
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