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  #111  
Old 11-02-2014, 05:00 AM
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Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Time to trim the rear lower wall section to match the new floor profile from the donor. I just simply used the form I had cut out to bend the flange over earlier in the floor. I had hammered flat the flange this wall had and it gave me just enough material that I needed.


One thing that didn't quite workout as well was the length of the flat section below the stock window. Had I been able to use the later wall I would have been ok, but the earlier wall with the smaller window needed to be altered to match the extra width it will have.


So to straighten the rear wall to suit the wider rear window I will make, I had to remove the wall brace. I have found that just driving in a cold chisel a little bit to create a bit of pressure prior to drilling out the top spot weld works well. As you drill through it pops a bit as soon as you are through the first layer of metal stopping you going though the next. I use a pilot point drill bit like shown earlier in my build.


The brace came off without drilling into the wall, apart from the pilot holes. Gives me a good opportunity to remove the rust under the brace as well.


The outside it is easy to strip off the paint and rust, but the inside is another story. So will throw it into my white vinegar and citric acid solution for a while to clean it up.


The solution did its trick and looks much better now.


Using the press plus hammer and dolly, I gently straightened out the wall brace. With the top of the wall I just leant on it while it was supported at each end only, and used a slapping file to flatten it out.


To strip the paint I have been using a paint stripping disc. 3M makes the most popular one but this 7" version was just bought at my local discount hardware store. I try to do only one layer of paint at a time to make sure I don't overheat area one area. Using this is better than a grinder, or sanding disc, as to easy too take off metal as well and leave gouges with those. Good way to find out the history of your cab as well. After the grey I found red, yellow, grey and then a red oxide primer!


Got a bit of a surprise when this nasty dent showed up under a layer of bog. The holes suggest they tried to use a dent puller but failed due to the B pillar being just behind it.


Can see the extent of the damage.


This pillar stops you getting at it as it is under it. The butterfly shaped rust spot is the start of it. I can cut out the damage section and replace it with a piece from the other cab. Will need to address the welding distortion though afterwards. To repair the inside of the pillar I need to take off this outer piece of the pillar, but have to anyway to be able to fully weld the top section back on later. The other way would be to try and remove the whole pillar and then hammer out the skin. Not sure if the damage is to bad or not to get it straight again?


The outside of the wall came up pretty well and without rust.


The inside of the wall below the old floor level had surface rust which couldn't be removed with the strip it disc. Using something like a grinder would have thinned the metal too much and created too much heat. I tried using some rust converter but was not happy with the results. Rather it be gone altogether.
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Invention is a combination of brains and materials.
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Last edited by Gojeep; 08-01-2017 at 11:57 PM.
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  #112  
Old 11-02-2014, 07:06 PM
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My pvc pipe with vinegar and citric acid was going to cost too much to make in a big quantity. So this time just using a stronger citric acid solution. I picked up a 25 kg/55 lb bag of it from a farm supply place. http://www.eem.com.au/ They use it a lot in wine making to clean out the stainless steel tanks after using caustic soda. Can also get it from pool supply places, or where you might buy ingredients to make bath bombs etc.


It just looks like sugar. Can get it in two forms, anhydrous or monohydrate. Either works the same so get whatever is the cheapest. I used anhydrous and got a 25 kg bulk bag for the same price as 5 kg ones sold elsewhere!


I used half a bag to make up just over a 5% solution in a bath tub that was given to me. The bath held 225 litres/59 US gallons to which I added 12.5 kg/27.5 lb of citric acid. I found the volume of 1 kg of the acid took the same amount of space in the bucket as 1 litre of water that was marked up the side.


I had carried buckets of hot water to the shed to help dissolve the citric acid. I counted the buckets as well so I knew how much water it held. I added a bit of acid at a time and stirred it until it dissolved.


The bath is not deep enough for the whole wall to be done at once. I have coated the wall above the water line with lanolin to stop it rusting while the rest gets done. You can dip your bare hands into this ratio if you have not cuts etc. Can tingle a bit, but washing with soap stops it. Gloves are a better idea.


Just to show how well this works, I just threw in a pair of Willys headlight buckets also.


These have not been touched at all with any treatment before going in.


Took this shot after 2 days and they have not been disturbed at all. The rust is just falling off! Day three didn't look that much different so decided to pull them out and see if it was long enough. The more acid you use, the quicker it will go.


Just used a nylon washing up brush to get rid of the loose rust.


It won't remove paint unless it is flaky or not well laid down in the first place. I found some areas with over spray on other parts, just washed off. It does soften the paint though and a bit of scrapping usually gets most off


I use a stainless steel scourer for a bit better job.


To neutralise the acid I just added a couple of tablespoons of bi-carb soda to some hot water. Same as baking soda but not baking powder. This step is especially important where any acid could be trapped and not easy washed away with water.


Need to dry it as quickly as possible to stop flash rust. Use an air gun or propane torch etc to dry it. Then it must be coated straight away in primer or some thing else. I use lanolin myself as won't be painting for some years yet.


Quite a difference from what I started with 3 days earlier.


The left one I ran the wire wheel over as well so why a bit brighter than the other.


The wall was turned over after washing off the acid. Also the lanolin was removed with thinners so it doesn't stop the acid from working on the non dipped part. Lanolin was rubbed on the part that has already been done.
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Marcus
aka. Gojeep
Victoria, Australia
http://willyshotrod.com

Invention is a combination of brains and materials.
The more brains you use, the less materials you need.

Last edited by Gojeep; 08-02-2017 at 12:00 AM.
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  #113  
Old 11-02-2014, 07:38 PM
Dave Deyton Dave Deyton is offline
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Very interesting. I have some old 5 gal. Gerry cans for my military Jeeps. May be an idea for cleaning them on the inside before coating with Red Kote or some other sealer.

This is a very ambitious project and your making great progress.
Cant wait to see the welding back together of the cab and the modifications you make.

Thanks for posting this information.

Dave
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  #114  
Old 11-02-2014, 08:57 PM
Marc Bourget Marc Bourget is offline
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Problem I remember from the family 62 Chevy PU, with the wide rear window were headlights from the rear at night.

Yeah, you can tint, etc, new rear view, but it added to the night blindness.

mjb
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  #115  
Old 11-02-2014, 11:12 PM
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thingsthatfly2 thingsthatfly2 is offline
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super cool on the citrus acid. how long have you been working on this project? what led up to this project and what is your background with this kind of work? Super fun to watch this all happen.
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  #116  
Old 11-03-2014, 05:13 AM
Ron Naida Ron Naida is online now
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great job,
excellent write up and details

Ron
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  #117  
Old 11-03-2014, 07:27 AM
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RatRockx RatRockx is offline
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Thanks for the rust removing tutorial. I'll be using this.
Great project too, by the way
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  #118  
Old 11-03-2014, 01:42 PM
VetteMemphis VetteMemphis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gojeep View Post
Thought I would add today some detail about how I am treating the rust. Might be of interest to some?


My pvc pipe with vinegar and citric acid was going to cost too much to make in a big quantity. So this time just using a stronger citric acid solution. I picked up a 25 kg/55 lb bag of it from a farm supply place. http://www.eem.com.au/ They use it a lot in wine making to clean out the stainless steel tanks after using caustic soda. Can also get it from pool supply places, or where you might buy ingredients to make bath bombs etc.


It just looks like sugar. Can get it in two forms, anhydrous or monohydrate. Either works the same so get what ever is the cheapest. I used anhydrous and got a 25 kg bulk bag for the same price as 5 kg ones sold else where!


I used half a bag to make up just over a 5% solution in a bath tub that was given to me. The bath held 225 litres/59 US gallons to which I added 12.5 kg/27.5 lb of citric acid. I found the volume of 1 kg of the acid took the same amount of space in the bucket as 1 litre of water that was marked up the side.


I had carried buckets of hot water to the shed to help dissolve the citric acid. I counted the buckets as well so I knew how much water it held. I added a bit of acid at a time and stirred it until it dissolved.


The bath is not deep enough for the whole wall to be done at once. I have coated the wall above the water line with lanolin to stop it rusting while the rest gets done. You can dip your bare hands into this ratio if you have not cuts etc. Can tingle a bit, but washing with soap stops it. Gloves are a better idea.


Just to show how well this works, I just threw in a pair of Willys headlight buckets also.


These have not been touched at all with any treatment before going in.


Took this shot after 2 days and they have not been disturbed at all. The rust is just falling off!


Day three doesn't look that much different so decided to pull them out and see if it was long enough. The more acid you use, the quicker it will go.


This is what the inside looked like just before scrubbing started.


Just used a nylon washing up brush.


All the rust is just washing off.


It wont remove paint unless it is flaky or not well laid down in the first place. I found some areas with over spray on other parts, just washed off. It does soften the paint though and a bit of scrapping usually gets most off


I use a stainless steel scourer for a bit better job.


To neutralise the acid I just added a couple of tablespoons of bi-carb soda to some hot water. Same as baking soda but not baking powder. This step is especially important where any acid could be trapped and not easy washed away with water.


Need to dry it as quickly as possible to stop flash rust. Use an air gun or propane torch etc to dry it. Then it must be coated straight away in primer or some thing else. I use lanolin myself as wont be painting for some years yet.


Quite a difference from what I started with 3 days earlier.


The left one I ran the wire wheel over as well so why a bit brighter than the other.


The wall was turned over after washing off the acid. Also the lanolin was removed with thinners so it doesn't stop the acid from working on the non dipped part. Lanolin was rubbed on the part that has already been done.
Marcus, thanks A MILLION for this tutorial. Anyone who has tackled more than one restoration will most likely admit that rust removal is the biggest challenge/headache to be encountered.

You can shape/fabricate replacement parts til the cows come home, but if you're just installing them over/near the same old rust, you'll be pulling your hair out in a couple of years or less.

This helps very, very much. Thanks, again.
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  #119  
Old 11-03-2014, 05:46 PM
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Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thingsthatfly2 View Post
super cool on the citrus acid. how long have you been working on this project? what led up to this project and what is your background with this kind of work? Super fun to watch this all happen.
I used to sneak into one of these trucks in someones over grown front yard where I spent my summers as a kid making brrrm brrm noises in it. Years later I went to see if it was still there with the hope of buying it in the early 80's, but was really badly rusted by then being near the seaside.
But this part of the story all started when I sent my wife at work a link to a eBay auction for a Willys pickup joking saying that is my dream project to hotrod something like this. She replied that I should bid on it! I only had a little tin 5'x7' garden shed that I was working out of and hardly the the space needed for a project like this.
The first Willys was bought back in 2008 but could not even pick it up for over a year as had no where to store it. Took that time for me to draw up my own plans for the workshop and get it approved by council and then I built it with a lot of donated timber.
Got the donor Jeep Grand Cherokee at auction in 2010 and that is when the build started in bits and pieces where I could fit it in between house renovations, which I am still doing, and other projects, life etc. So you are really seeing this in fast forward so don't be impressed by the speed as I am slow trying to learn while getting it to a standard that I am after. It is all about the build for me rather than what I need it for once finished. I will be sad once it is completed as enjoy working on it and the skills I am learning while doing it.
My back ground started as a blacksmith/farrier. Went on to get my tickets as a boiler marker working in the structural steel side of things. Nearly all arc welding and some mig. Went to night school to learn some engineering in that field but never completed the coarse as lost to many points not keeping my drafting pages clean as was still building the steel side of buildings back then, so my hands were never completely clean. Back in the days before computers.
Later on I use to build huge extractor fans for buildings etc that had airfoil blades etc, but the parts were all pressed out or folded so no hand forming as such. The mig welded together.
Went on to working in a brake and clutch place bench pressing in gear boxes all day long as had no lifts in the place! Did services etc as well.
Probably more info than you were after.
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Marcus
aka. Gojeep
Victoria, Australia
http://willyshotrod.com

Invention is a combination of brains and materials.
The more brains you use, the less materials you need.

Last edited by Gojeep; 11-05-2014 at 06:21 PM.
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  #120  
Old 11-03-2014, 05:47 PM
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Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Decided to have a go at beating out the big dent at the B pillar rather than cutting it out and putting in a patch panel.


Thought it would be easier to remove the whole pillar so I could get access to it.


Roughed out the dent by hammering directly onto the bench. Started in the middle as read the best way it to reverse the impact. To straighten the fold I clamped it along the edge of the table and used a slapping file.


After just using the bench I switched to a dolly as a backer, selecting the one closest to the undamaged curve.


Getting there but actually has to be curved outwards some after checking the good side for comparison.


To get it past just straight, used a domed hammer on the inside and a palm beater bag filled with brickies sand on the outside.


Just about there but need to weld up the holes, which will cause some shrinkage, and then will also sharpen that fold.


Came up pretty well. Have only used a light sanding block to help see the highs and lows. Will leave it at that for now and later maybe try filing it and use a shrinking disc on it.


The panel after being in the acid bath.


Good demonstration of how well the acid works as can see it was not quite deep enough for the whole sill. Will dip that bit now.


The other corner panel has some rust issues as well as this dent. The sill has also been damaged and not very well hammered back out at one stage.


Doesn't show well in the photo, but the blocking hammer I used had a matching curve on the head to the panel.


A couple of minutes and looking a lot better already. That part was done over the beater bag.


Switched to hitting over the bench and only the bottom edge to go. Just trying out different techniques to see which way works best. Good fun learning.


Looking pretty good and getting faster at doing this. Will weld up the cut at the bottom and the other drill holes before deciding how best to tackle the rust holes.
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Marcus
aka. Gojeep
Victoria, Australia
http://willyshotrod.com

Invention is a combination of brains and materials.
The more brains you use, the less materials you need.

Last edited by Gojeep; 08-02-2017 at 01:12 AM.
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