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  #1  
Old 07-06-2022, 09:04 AM
rustreapers rustreapers is offline
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Default Molasses Rust Removal Questions.

Looking for feed back concerning Molasses rust removal.
What mixing ratios are most effective?
Do you use food grade or Molasses containing Sulphur?
Do you need to screed off the mold or does it disappear over time?
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Old 07-06-2022, 11:33 AM
tom walker tom walker is offline
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I can't answer your question about molasses, but I would suggest that you consider using EDTA (preservative) buffered with citric acid. This concoction mimics "Evaporust", and it's a lot cheaper. You can find all the details online.
Tom
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Old 07-06-2022, 06:23 PM
hillman hillman is offline
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https://www.allmetalshaping.com/show...light=molasses

It's a matter of using the search engine

Post No8
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  #4  
Old 07-06-2022, 10:27 PM
norson norson is offline
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Molasses
I bought my molasses at a feed store. It's used for cattle feed. I comes in 4??gallon buckets. Ratio - 7 to 1. I put ten buckets in a 300 gallon stock tank and topped off with water. It would take about twelve days to clean a rusty body. doesn't clean paint. pressure wash with water and neutralize with Prep N Etch from Home Depot to kill the flash rust. When I was buying molasses the cost was $9.00 a bucket.
My experience: seemed to last three months before it started to smell and the neighbors complained. Worked great but takes a long time and is sensitive to temperatures.

Citric Acid
One bag $90.00 (70-80 lbs.) to 300 gallons of water. Cleans rusty parts in 4-5 days. Neutralize with baking soda/water then wash down with Prep N Etch to stop the flash rust. Not affected by temperatures, the citrus seems to drop the freeze point to less than 25 degrees. And it doesn't smell. This current batch has lasted two years.

I have parts that I treated with Prep N Etch that are rust free in my shop after four years.

C100A53F-572E-4E85-B435-61A60B0FF990_1_105_c.jpeg
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Last edited by galooph; 07-07-2022 at 02:29 AM.
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Old 07-07-2022, 08:14 AM
rustreapers rustreapers is offline
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Default Thanks Guys!!

It looks like Citric Acid is a better choice.
Sorry for the Daa moment. Yes I should have looked before I leaped and searched here first.
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  #6  
Old 07-09-2022, 06:12 PM
Charlie Myres Charlie Myres is offline
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Molasses is a fantastic rust stripper; I use 1:10. Heating the mix makes it work much faster and when it is finished, it can be safely dumped.

Covering the bath, if possible, prevents mould forming.

If anyone wants a copy of some Word.doc files I have written on the subject, feel free to PM me,

Cheers Charlie
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Old 07-11-2022, 03:20 AM
metal manny metal manny is offline
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Molasses tastes better than citric acid!
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Old 07-12-2022, 10:40 PM
JimRussell JimRussell is offline
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Vinegar works well too. I guess it would depend on the size of the part. Cheap and easy on small parts, large parts would require a lot of vinegar. Also removes the mill scale on steel.
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Old 07-16-2022, 11:02 AM
David Ward David Ward is offline
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I use citric acid, vinegar, and have used molasses. Citric acid is by far the easiest, fastest, and cheapest, to deal with. I let it go in the grass when Iím done. The only thing is to be sure to neutralize it well between seams. Use a pressure washer. I too follow up with phosphoric acid wash, mostly to remove the last of the other acid because phosphoric is stronger than citric acid, and Iím familiar with paint application with phosphoric acid treatments. Also, if youíre dealing with old lacquer primer, it will lift the primer without sanding.
Dave
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Old 07-17-2022, 08:40 AM
sumtu sumtu is offline
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Tom could you explain the EDTA and citric acid concocion more please thanks
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