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  #321  
Old 11-11-2020, 02:10 PM
dwmh dwmh is offline
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Beautiful, a work of art in itself.
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  #322  
Old 11-12-2020, 08:56 PM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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Man, I like that.
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  #323  
Old 11-14-2020, 11:19 AM
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heinke heinke is offline
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Beautiful, a work of art in itself.
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Man, I like that.
Thanks guys!
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  #324  
Old 11-17-2020, 02:21 PM
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heinke heinke is offline
MetalShaper of the Month Jan 2018
 
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Post Front clip interface to passenger door

Now that I have the station buck main body module assembled, I was able to get the location measurements for the door top. Till now I had been assuming the top front of the door skin would be at the same height as where it was on the C4 Corvette door frames. Turns out it’s not and that’s going to cause a small amount of rework. Oh well, better to catch it now than later when it would have been a lot worse.

The top front corner of the door skin on my Miura is going to be about ¾” higher than it was on the donor C4 Corvette door frame. The main difference is the C4 door skin started at a lower height and angled slightly upward as it went across the door. The Miura door skin starts higher and is level across the door until it makes the dramatic upward swoop that’s the signature of Miura doors. So I need to remake the front clip inner structure where it forms the front door gap for a smooth transition to the door top.

After cutting the weld and discarding the old, I started with cardboard templates and making a new sub-structure for the front clip skin.







The tricky part is that there is no door gap at this point. I didn’t want to trim the front inner door frame yet as invariably I’d make it too short. So I had to work with the door open while positioning and test fitting the front clip substructure. I used a cardboard template made from the station buck to get the proper shape and curvature in the substructure and adjacent door frame. I then trimmed the substructure for the desired door opening outline, then marked and trimmed the door frame to get a 1/8” gap. A wider gap will be needed prior to mounting body skins but I wanted to test for contact on door opening with a small gap.



The good news is that there is no contact in that gap area as the door is opened even with only 1/8” gap. This confirms that the door hinge outward repositioning was successful!

Now I can proceed making the top part of the inner door frame and have a defined target on the front clip substructure to work to.
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  #325  
Old 11-26-2020, 02:48 PM
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heinke heinke is offline
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Post Door frames (cont.)

I proceeded to shape the upper part of the passenger inner door frame. It’s a bit of an odd shape and I wanted a smooth flow from the lower portion of the frame. Unlike on a normal car, this part of the door frame is directly visible when the front clip is raised so it needs to look good. I made up a cardboard template and ran it through the bead roller to tip the edge similar to how I anticipated making the actual aluminum one. Not to surprisingly, my first attempt at making the piece in aluminum sheet was not quite right and became the latest piece added to scrap bin. My error was too large of a radius when tipping in the bend line in the curved section.

The second attempt came out great. Here it is welded in place.



And the front visible side…



The lessons learned from the first attempt that was scrapped. Anneal along the tip line prior to doing any tipping on it. I used a 3mm radius tipping roll so it didn’t mark the panel too much while heavy pressure was being put on it to form the bend. The shaping process worked best when alternating between shrinking the curved edge area and forcing the bend tighter via tipping.

And after successfully making the passenger side, I repeated the process for the drivers side.



Of course, this side took less time and the shape is cleaner.
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  #326  
Old 11-27-2020, 12:26 PM
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Steve Hamilton Steve Hamilton is offline
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Nicely done Joel
only you will know that they are not the same.

thanks for keeping us updated.

Steve
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  #327  
Old 11-27-2020, 08:35 PM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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Looks great as always. I really like seeing the attention given to areas that will remain largely unseen.
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  #328  
Old 12-06-2020, 04:13 AM
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Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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No part is scrap if you learned from it.
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  #329  
Old 12-06-2020, 01:13 PM
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heinke heinke is offline
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No part is scrap if you learned from it.
Oh so true!
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  #330  
Old 12-06-2020, 06:19 PM
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heinke heinke is offline
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Post Miura powertrain phase begins!

I’m now embarking on the powertrain phase for the Miura project. I’m doing this prior to completing the chassis and body phases as I want to prove out that I can make various aspects of this very unique transverse engine powertrain approach actually work. My experience from the computer software industry is that when venturing into the unknown or risky territory, it’s much better to “fail fast”, innovate and recover than to attempt a “big bang” from which failure is most often fatal for the project.

In preparation for the powertrain phase, I moved the Miura chassis outdoors for some “big picture” viewing and to take some progress photos.







And here’s the part that makes me most nervous as it relates to powertrain. The engine, transaxle, and drive axles all must fit into this relatively small compartment in the chassis.



The first thing I want to prove is that the intended powertrain will actually fit. So here’s some pieces that arrived this week.





It’s a Ford 5.0 L Coyote engine from a wrecked 2017 Mustang GT with 15K miles on it. I chose the DOHC Coyote engine as the original Miura had a DOHC engine and anything less wouldn’t feel right. My first impression is that the Coyote is a very wide engine at the wide part of the “V”. I sure hope it fits

I bought it as a “Master Kit” which by the 1653 lb. shipping crate weight includes about half of the original car by weight. I don’t anticipate using all those parts in the Miura but I figured that given all the electronic wizardry involved, it’s better to have the whole engine/transmission/wiring harness setup and whittle it down to what’s actually needed for the project.

After 3 years in the making, I also picked up the Pete Aardema inspired and designed transaxle this week as well. Kevin Braun is the master machinist who machined/carved the aluminum billet into a precision transaxle. The cast aluminum bit in the middle is a Tremec TKO 5 speed transmission.





Now comes the job of mating the engine and transaxle up and do a trial fitting into the engine compartment. If it fits, then it’s on to fabricating mounting brackets. If it doesn’t fit, hopefully it just a matter of trimming off some spare chassis material … or time to innovate
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