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  #1701  
Old 02-12-2021, 12:47 PM
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123pugsy 123pugsy is offline
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Kidding aside, some of the best all around content I've seen, has em coming back.
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my project:
http://www.allmetalshaping.com/showthread.php?t=154
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  #1702  
Old 02-14-2021, 06:16 PM
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Giday Jack,

I guess I'm one of the other 5
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  #1703  
Old 02-15-2021, 01:13 PM
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Hey Jack,everyone of those hits well deserved! You said this was your way of paying back the guys that taught you or something along those lines. Lol I think you have certainly paid your debt in full,the variety of skills you have shown us in this thread is pure awesomeness.
THANK YOU!
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  #1704  
Old 02-15-2021, 01:18 PM
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Not paying back. Paying forward.
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  #1705  
Old 02-18-2021, 12:54 AM
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When I was making the carbon fiber engine side closure panels, I didn't have much time to get detailed pictures so I'll go into detail here. When I made those, I was using a mold that was removed after the panels cured. I laid up three layers of carbon fiber cloth and two separate applications of resin. Those are stand alone panels. Their strength is built in.



These cowl panels will remain in their "molds". The ABS and carbon fiber will bond together as a unit so I won't need to use multiple layers of cloth.




I think I mentioned last time that this method is strictly for cosmetic pieces. There are completely different procedures for structural c/f parts that require either pressurized injection molds or vacuum molding and very carefully measured quantities of resin.
The finished ABS panel below has been wiped down with acetone to remove any mold release agents that might be left behind, then lightly sanded rough with 80# on a DA. I masked off the area with the vent/drain holes and it's ready.



Name:  1969.jpg
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I laid the panel over some c/f cloth and taped off the cut lines leaving plenty of excess material along the edges. Be very careful handling the cloth. It's a loose weave and if it snags, it will pull the strands out of alignment. Cut the cloth with scissors down the middle of the tape and leave the tape on both the piece you're using and the roll so they won't unravel.


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Next, carefully lay the C/F cloth over the panel and tuck in or relief cut where needed.


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Epoxy resin is preferred for C/F, it has a longer work time than polyester resin typically used for fiberglass. Depending on temperature, sunlight (UV), and humidity polyester resin can start kicking in just a few minutes. With epoxy resin you have anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour. C/F doesn't saturate quite as readily as fiberglass, so the extra time to work with a spreader and brush helps.
Pictured below are two separate kits of epoxy resin. The smaller 16 fl oz kit was left over from the side panel work. The 64 fl oz kit is fresh. Two different brands and sizes but the same product.


If you're looking to buy this stuff beware that there are a few unscrupulous characters out there selling it by the ounce (weight). Be sure the label says fluid ounces (fl oz). Also, prices vary wildly. You should be able to get a 64 fl oz kit (2 - 32fl oz bottles) for around $40 USD. About 65 cents per ounce.


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You'll need: 2K epoxy resin kit, mixing cup (the resin doesn't eat up these plastic cups), a flat roller(sqeezes out bubbles and voids), a 90 degree corner roller, brush and spreader, and some acetone for clean up. Lacquer thinner will work also.


Measure accurately and mix thoroughly. Follow the directions that come with the resin. Proportion is vital. If you under catalyze, it won't cure and you'll have an unsalvageable mess on your hands and have to scrap it and start over.



Name:  1973.jpg
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Pour it on, spread it out, work the bubbles out and let it cure overnight. Clean up is easy with acetone.
Tomorrow I'll trim the edges and sand lightly before putting on another coat of resin. If this were a flat part like the side panels, I would just level the part on the bench and pour the resin on and let gravity do the rest. Since these panels are all different shapes, I'll have to brush on a few layers letting them kick one layer at a time.


Name:  1974.jpg
Views: 503
Size:  112.9 KB
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Last edited by Jack 1957; 02-21-2021 at 12:21 PM.
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  #1706  
Old 02-18-2021, 06:51 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack 1957 View Post
When I was making the carbon fiber engine side closure panels, I didn't have much time to get detailed pictures so I'll go into detail here. When I made those, I was using a mold that was removed after the panels cured. I laid up three layers of carbon fiber cloth and two separate applications of resin. Those are stand alone panels. Their strength is built in.

These cowl panels will remain in their "molds". The ABS and carbon fiber will bond together as a unit so I won't need to use multiple layers of cloth.

I think I mentioned last time that this method is strictly for cosmetic pieces. There are completely different procedures for structural c/f parts that require either pressurized injection molds or vacuum molding and very carefully measured quantities of resin.
The finished ABS panel below has been wiped down with acetone to remove any mold release agents that might be left behind, then lightly sanded rough with 80# on a DA. I masked off the area with the vent/drain holes and it's ready.
Attachment 58848
I laid the panel over some c/f cloth and taped off the cut lines leaving plenty of excess material along the edges. Be very careful handling the cloth. It's a loose weave and if it snags, it will pull the strands out of alignment. Cut the cloth with scissors down the middle of the tape and leave the tape on both the piece you're using and the roll so they won't unravel.
Attachment 58849
Next, carefully lay the C/F cloth over the panel and tuck in or relief cut where needed.
Attachment 58850
Epoxy resin is preferred for C/F, it has a longer work time than polyester resin typically used for fiberglass. Depending on temperature, sunlight (UV), and humidity polyester resin can start kicking in just a few minutes. With epoxy resin you have anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour. C/F doesn't saturate quite as readily as fiberglass, so the extra time and work with a spreader and brush helps.
Pictured below are two separate kits of epoxy resin. The smaller 16 fl oz kit was left over from the side panel work. The 64 fl oz kit is fresh. Two different brands and sizes but the same product.


If you're looking to buy this stuff beware that there are a few unscrupulous characters out there selling it by the ounce (weight). Be sure the label says fluid ounces (fl oz). Also, prices vary wildly. You should be able to get a 64 fl oz kit (2 - 32fl oz bottles) for around $40 USD. About 65 cents per ounce.
Attachment 58851
You'll need: 2K epoxy resin kit, mixing cup (the resin doesn't eat up these plastic cups), a flat roller(sqeezes out bubbles and voids), a 90 degree corner roller, brush and spreader, and some acetone for clean up. Lacquer thinner will work also.
Measure accurately and mix thoroughly. Follow the directions that come with the resin. Proportion is vital. If you under catalyze, it won't cure and you'll have an unsalvageable mess on your hands and have to scrap it and start over.
Attachment 58852
Pour it on, spread it out, work the bubbles out and let it cure overnight. Clean up is easy with acetone.
Tomorrow I'll trim the edges and sand lightly before putting on another coat of resin. If this were a flat part like the side panels, I would just level the part on the bench and pour the resin on and let gravity do the rest. Since these panels are all different shapes, I'll have to brush on a few layers letting them kick one layer at a time.
Attachment 58853

Super helpful procedure explanation, with cautions, hints, and sourcing.
Awesome tutorial, Jack.
Big thanks!

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  #1707  
Old 02-19-2021, 06:39 PM
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Steve Hamilton Steve Hamilton is offline
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Hi Jack
Thanks for sharing your very detailed procedure with us.
Your project just keeps getting more impressive by the day!


Steve
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  #1708  
Old 02-20-2021, 07:34 PM
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Jack 1957 Jack 1957 is offline
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I put a second coat of resin one both halves of the cowl and they look pretty good as is. This stuff lays up pretty thick so I really don't need anymore.
Once the resin is spread out, I use a torch to clear the air bubbles out.
The resin must not produce any flammable fumes cuz you can get in pretty close with the torch without any problems. The surface lays down flat and no bubbles.



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Views: 329
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Name:  1976.jpg
Views: 327
Size:  113.8 KB
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  #1709  
Old 02-22-2021, 02:41 PM
dwmh dwmh is offline
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Very clever Jack. I would never have dreamed of taking a torch to it. We never stop learning. Thanks for all your posts on a great project.
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  #1710  
Old 02-22-2021, 03:29 PM
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Jack 1957 Jack 1957 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwmh View Post
...I would never have dreamed of taking a torch to it.....
You can also just blow on it but with a larger part like this you risk hyperventilating, passing out, and waking up with the part bonded to your face.
Everything in me screams "Chemicals and open flames don't mix!" But it doesn't seem to be hazardous. I think it is the CO2 that does it.
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