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Old 12-13-2020, 07:18 PM
echedey echedey is offline
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Default how to make and shape a body buck by hand

Hello everyone I am new to the forum I introduce myself my name is echedey before I present myself in the presentations section I am from Spain, and I have some doubts first with which software the body buck is made, I have a 3d model of the ac cobra and I just need make the sections to cut in wood aber if someone knows something I have a program that is very basic that I doubt that it will be used, which is the slicer for fusion if someone would help me I would appreciate it.
Then I would like to do the same but as the manufacturers of cars like ferrari, ford and many brands did it before, instead of using a pc, I wanted to make it with paper and pencil as they did it, someone knows how they do it in case they know of a book or manual of how they did it in the 20s or 40s or 60s as it was modeled at that time as the body buck did if they did not open my body I want to work them out.
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Old 12-18-2020, 03:43 PM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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I cannot help with any computer-related design or drafting. All I do is old fashion analog for my sculpture work. If you need help understanding how to do the proper accurate calculations for enlargement or reduction with simple tools and mathematical functions with little to no numerical calculations, I can help.

I have no proof, but believe that pencil & paper drafting methods originally used to create station bucks for cars were derived from lofting techniques used in boat building. Lofting is used to produce the physical spars on a wooden boat from pencil & paper drawings. A spar on a wooden boat hull is analogous to a station on an automotive buck. There are many books about lofting a wooden boat from plans.
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Old 12-18-2020, 06:01 PM
norson norson is offline
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I was trying to do what assume you are trying --- build a full size car from a small model. I came to the conclusion "I" couldn't do it. I thought I would need to model off a full size car, but if I could find a car, no one would allow me to crawl all over their car. I solved the problem by finding a guy with a mould for a fiber glass body for my style car ('33 Willys). I only needed the back half of the body, but he wanted more than I could afford so I got one quarter (to the center of the car) for $400. I used it to make contours in pairs. I also bought a glass trunk lid and rear body panel fill in the cars center.
Here are a few pictures showing some details.
Given the car you want to build, you might be able to buy a glass body from stalled project and then recoup your funds after you're done by selling it.
A friend of mine borrowed one side of a '32 Ford roadster body from Dee Wescott and used his wood duplicater machine to duplicate it in Maple. He's been driving the car for thirty years.

P4090179.JPG

P9060545.JPG
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Last edited by Steve Hamilton; 12-18-2020 at 06:52 PM.
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Old 12-18-2020, 07:06 PM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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If you are trying to enlarge a scale model, it's wise to enlarge it in a number of steps vs all at once. Information is lost or discarded when a 3D object is reduced in size. When it is enlarged, information must be added. Scale models are notoriously inaccurate when compared to the full size original. Most souvenir-quality scale models aren't worth much as source information for larger jobs.

Properly done, enlargement by a factor of no more than 2x is normal among professionals- whether being done by hand/analog or by electronic means with a scanner and CNC. The enlarged model is then corrected & proofed before being enlarged again by a factor of no more than 2x. Repeat, repeat, repeat until you reach a usable and adequately corrected model that can measured for direct application to the job.

It's a lot of work to do properly, but it is an excellent exercise for the craftsman. by the time you are ready to produce the final job, you will have a much better understanding of the object you are producing. The likelihood of unnoticed mistakes will be diminished and the quality of final work is increased.
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Old 12-19-2020, 02:17 PM
echedey echedey is offline
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Default Could you explain it to me like you do

Could you explain to me in detail how you do it, see if my mind lights up and I learn to do it myself little by little, either with photos, videos or thanks to whom.
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Old 12-19-2020, 07:49 PM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by echedey View Post
Could you explain to me in detail how you do it, see if my mind lights up and I learn to do it myself little by little, either with photos, videos or thanks to whom.
Please be specific about what you plan to do. Help me and others here who may offer advice understand what you already can or cannot do.

Are you trying to enlarge a small cobra model that you can hold in your hands to make a fullsize buck to use for building a real car? Are you an experienced woodworker or draftsman?
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Old 12-20-2020, 11:07 AM
metaldahlberg88 metaldahlberg88 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffrod View Post
I cannot help with any computer-related design or drafting. All I do is old fashion analog for my sculpture work. If you need help understanding how to do the proper accurate calculations for enlargement or reduction with simple tools and mathematical functions with little to no numerical calculations, I can help.

I have no proof, but believe that pencil & paper drafting methods originally used to create station bucks for cars were derived from lofting techniques used in boat building. Lofting is used to produce the physical spars on a wooden boat from pencil & paper drawings. A spar on a wooden boat hull is analogous to a station on an automotive buck. There are many books about lofting a wooden boat from plans.
According to "A Century of Automotive Style" by Michael Lamm and David Holls, the lofting technique from shipbuilding was introduced to carriage design by Albert Dupont and carried on by Andrew Johnson with his Technical School for Carriage and Automobile Body Designers. Some of Johnson students were Ray Dietrich, Charles Nash, and some of the Fisher brothers. So surely the lofting ideas were put into practice in early automobiles.
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Old 12-20-2020, 12:13 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metaldahlberg88 View Post
According to "A Century of Automotive Style" by Michael Lamm and David Holls, the lofting technique from shipbuilding was introduced to carriage design by Albert Dupont and carried on by Andrew Johnson with his Technical School for Carriage and Automobile Body Designers. Some of Johnson students were Ray Dietrich, Charles Nash, and some of the Fisher brothers. So surely the lofting ideas were put into practice in early automobiles.

....and aviation.
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Old 12-20-2020, 12:33 PM
Chris_Hamilton Chris_Hamilton is offline
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JMO, but this is one of those questions that there is no step one, step two step three etc, easy answers to. You just have to do a lot of searching and reading and learning, along with trial and error. Selecting something small and building a station buck for that would be good experience and give you a better idea of what is involved.

If you have an accurate CAD model then a place like this could "section" it and create the info needed to have the wood cut on a CNC machine.

https://www.3dengineers.co.uk/
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  #10  
Old 12-20-2020, 12:38 PM
John Buchtenkirch John Buchtenkirch is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by echedey View Post
Could you explain to me in detail how you do it, see if my mind lights up and I learn to do it myself little by little, either with photos, videos or thanks to whom.
A search of “building a wooden body buck” on U-tube came up with over a dozen videos. Watching all of them would be a great way to start learning about the hows & whys of bucks. ~ John Buchtenkirch
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