All MetalShaping

All MetalShaping (https://www.allmetalshaping.com/index.php)
-   Buck Building (https://www.allmetalshaping.com/forumdisplay.php?f=62)
-   -   Modern-day Miura: seeking buck making information (https://www.allmetalshaping.com/showthread.php?t=18557)

heinke 11-26-2018 10:55 PM

Modern-day Miura: seeking buck making information
 
If you're not already familiar with my Miura project, the build diary is here: Modern-day Miura

For this project, I'm having a 3D model created for the body design and then having the model sliced into jig/buck stations. I will get the cutting instructions and then have the jig/buck stations water jet cut. I've already engaged professional help with the above but there's a set of answers/information I need to provide to the person doing the modeling work.

Let me state up front, I've done a fair amount of metal shaping but have yet to make a full blown buck. I'm hoping to learn from you all that have experience with buck making so I can avoid rookie mistakes :eek:

My initial questions are:
  1. What material (e.g. plywood, MDF, masonite, etc.) that can be water jet cut is best to use for making a buck?
  2. What is the best material thickness for buck stations?
  3. What is best spacing for buck stations?
  4. Should all buck stations be spaced the same or are there areas where buck stations should be closer/farther apart?
  5. What other considerations should I pass along for inclusion in the buck station design/definition?

I have a choice of either making the buck free standing or making it to sit on the chassis. A free standing buck sounds simpler to me but there might be advantages to using the chassis as a buck foundation. Is one of these approaches more advantageous? What are the considerations of going free standing or on chassis?

If freestanding, I've been thinking a multi-piece buck might work best. The Miura body is composed of a one piece flip-up front clip, a one piece flip-up rear clip, and the middle section. Making a separate buck for each of these sections seems logical to me. If done right the three could be joined together to form the whole car body buck. Has anyone made a buck like this? What are potential pitfalls with this approach?

Kerry Pinkerton 11-26-2018 11:11 PM

Joel, I can't answer any of your questions but applaud your decision to make a hard buck. I've wasted YEARS of work and rework because I did not take the time to make a hard buck which would have forced my panels to be symmetrical.


I love flexible shape patterns but without something to tell you HOW they fit to the next panel you can get out of symmetry in about half a heartbeat. Ask me how I know...:lol:


I'm at the point where I'm still not sure if I should continue on with work that I'm not happy with or bite the bullet, scan one side, have someone make it symmetrical, and get a buck made and start over. I'm not sure it wouldn't be faster even as far along as I appear to be.


Good luck. Your project is going to be awesome.

Marc Bourget 11-28-2018 10:45 AM

Isn't it RockHillWill that posted a series of hard bucks from European shops and/or museums? Check those threads?

Kerry Pinkerton 11-28-2018 11:42 AM

No, it's Bill Longyard that has posted all the photos from his travels while researching his books.

heinke 11-30-2018 04:54 PM

Still need buck building information
 
So I now have confirmation that using a buck aids the metal shaping process (thanks Kerry). What I don't have yet is input from those who've done this before. If that's you, please share your knowledge.

In addition to the questions in the initial thread post, I'd like advice on best tool for cutting buck stations. At first, I was thinking water jet because I'd heard that mentioned a couple of times. In poking around the last few days, I've also seen CNC Router mentioned. Does anyone have experience that would help to say which of these is the better tool/process?

Steve Hamilton 11-30-2018 07:46 PM

Hi Joel
Kerry is correct about Bill getting info in Europe, but Rockhill Will, did post a lot of info on CAD and water jet to make bucks. I saw the bucks and remember that they fit together very well.

The bucks were to be used for the Bugatti project that Jim Henry is building. Not sure of the best way to search for them.

I found this in the automotive projects
http://allmetalshaping.com/showthread.php?t=15200

Steve

RockHillWill 11-30-2018 08:28 PM

These might help.

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/showt...Bugatti&page=3

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/showt...Bugatti&page=3

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/showt...hlight=Bugatti

mr.c 12-01-2018 02:01 PM

Creative Workshop in Dania,FL built a one off of a 50's vintage sportscar. Their own design but it had a Maserati flavor to it. Riveted period fuel tank and all.
I visited their shop a few times as they had traced me down for some information on a ASA 1000 GT that they were restoring. Stan Lobitz and I went one time and I took some photos of the car in process. They used a steel rod buck as seen in this photo. The finished car was beautiful and the buck is hanging from the rafters in their showroom. Photos of the car should still be on their website.
The photo has some of the skins on the floor behind the car. Yes, nice work can be done in a messy shop.
http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...pictureid=3568

Chris_Hamilton 12-02-2018 11:53 AM

Wonder how well that TIG in the background works on a wooden floor? :lol: Did go to the website, seems like a first rate shop.

heinke 12-03-2018 05:37 PM

Station buck findings
 
I've read every thread I could find where a station buck was involved and made several direct inquiries to people. What's interesting is as new applicable technologies have become available (e.g. 3D modeling, CNC, etc.), what's involved in making a station buck has changed. So this dynamic cuts down even further the number of people with experience in making a station buck with the current technology.

I'm not in the business of manufacturing cars and so realistically this buck will get used one time. I know it's important to have it but I also don't want to over engineer it either. So this is my current direction for making a station buck.

Materials: 1/2" MDF or plywood stations spaced at 6 or 8 inches.

Station Cutting: CNC laser or router, still working out which will work best given the businesses providing these services in my local area

Buck type: free standing egg crate that will likely get transformed to be mounted directly on chassis later in project

My initial need for the buck is to get reliable surface information for the purpose of fabricating the inner body structures. These inner structures need to run very close under the body skin and be designed to pass through
very narrow places and around various obstructions. I think I can get the needed surface information via lofting/making contour gauges from a free standing buck.

The main issue I have with a free standing buck over the longer term is lack of garage floor space. In other words, I need available floor space for the chassis itself and additional cars worth of floorspace for the buck. The beauty of a chassis mounted buck is it only takes up the floorspace for a single car. But the downside of a chassis mounted buck is the conflict between chassis components and inner structures with the buck stations. You need to cut openings in the stations where the inner structures pass through. So I think I can free up enough floor space for the time it takes to build the inner structures. Then I trim down the stations to fit on the chassis and around inner structures so I can reclaim the floorspace by mounting buck stations on the chassis.

So this is my quandary and why I'm thinking of starting with a free standing buck and then seeing what makes the most sense from there forward.

Thoughts? Ideas? Feedback?

steve.murphy 12-03-2018 06:56 PM

You may have seen this already: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDgE47M73CE
About halfway they talk about how he builds the buck .

Kerry Pinkerton 12-03-2018 07:43 PM

We have a member here, Brent Click, that has a new state-of-the-art scanner and the cad software to go with it. He doesn't visit often but is active on Facebook. I bet there is a FB scanning group you could join and ask for who does what. I'll be glad to ask Brent if he has any contacts on the west coast.

That said, you're going to need to get access to a car and expect you'll need it to be somewhat local because you're going to want to participate in the stretching process so I expect you'll want to use someone local.

My limited experience is that waterjet does a nicer and faster job than CNC routers. One of the companies I did some sculpture work with up in Indianapolis was primarily a water jet company with the latest and greatest in technology. In fact, they were beta testing a new FloJet machine during the months I was there. Obviously, the machine cuts faster in thinner and softer material and in wood it just flies!

RockHillWill 12-03-2018 08:34 PM

Good evening Joel. Just some random thoughts:

A free standing egg crate buck can be made in sections that bolt together. When bolted together it can be used as a 'dummy' body for making body and chassis mounting brackets. If you look at the links that I made above you can note that the components are made in an interlocking manner. I used glue to hold them together because I wanted to be able to use them as a type of 'hammer form' as I am not yet a very skilled metal shaper. If you chose to bolt or screw them together, they could be disassembled for storage.

By using the water jet to cut, if can get the water jet guy to tell you when he has installed a new nozzle, you do not have to allow for clearances when drawing the parts. I used 5/8" thick Baltic Birch plywood and the fit together so well that often I had to tap them into place. Buck that I n=made over ten years ago have been used often for miscellaneous classes, etc.

heinke 12-05-2018 01:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kerry Pinkerton (Post 151332)
My limited experience is that waterjet does a nicer and faster job than CNC routers. One of the companies I did some sculpture work with up in Indianapolis was primarily a water jet company with the latest and greatest in technology. In fact, they were beta testing a new FloJet machine during the months I was there. Obviously, the machine cuts faster in thinner and softer material and in wood it just flies!

Quote:

Originally Posted by RockHillWill (Post 151337)
Good evening Joel. Just some random thoughts:

A free standing egg crate buck can be made in sections that bolt together. When bolted together it can be used as a 'dummy' body for making body and chassis mounting brackets. If you look at the links that I made above you can note that the components are made in an interlocking manner. I used glue to hold them together because I wanted to be able to use them as a type of 'hammer form' as I am not yet a very skilled metal shaper. If you chose to bolt or screw them together, they could be disassembled for storage.

By using the water jet to cut, if can get the water jet guy to tell you when he has installed a new nozzle, you do not have to allow for clearances when drawing the parts. I used 5/8" thick Baltic Birch plywood and the fit together so well that often I had to tap them into place. Buck that I n=made over ten years ago have been used often for miscellaneous classes, etc.

Thanks for the information!

Does anyone have experience with the combination of MDF and CNC Laser? I'm thinking of using MDF because of cost (a whole car buck uses lots of sheets times high cost per sheet equals $BIG BUCKS$). One of the cons of MDF is it doesn't do well with water. But if MDF cuts well with laser then that might be a winning combination.

RockHillWill 12-05-2018 05:04 PM

It took me a while to come to the conclusion that if you are going to have a useable, lasting wooden egg crate buck, cheap will rule that out. I tried several kinds of plywood and none of it turned out to work well for me. It split, drew moisture, split when I hit on it with a hammer, etc. Water from the water jet leaves a mild surface stain that rubs right off, but water has no effect on it that I have seen to date, and some of my Model A bucks are 14 years old
When I was in racing, one of the Ford factory chassis builders and parts suppliers had a sign at his sales counter that said "speed costs money, how fast do you want to go". It was, and still Is, sound logic. You will get what you pay for.

As always, this is just an opinion from an old guy!

vroom 12-09-2018 11:41 AM

Buck
 
I built a square tube frame just smaller than the outside surface. (rigid and light weight) Then I covered it with 1/4" baltic birch plywood (very stable and stiff)
Then I cut away the inside surface of my 1/4" baltic birch buck stations and glued them to the plywood box using small wood blocks as reenforcement. Finally I coated the whole thing with polyurethane floor finish. This made a light and stable buck for most of my car.

Any highly sculpted area (around the headlights etc.) I ended up building up solid with MDF (1/2" and 1/4" layers) and filing and smoothing with pattern makers filler and coating with epoxy. I bolted this final piece to the steel frame. It only describes the first 8" of my car but weighs more than the rest of my buck.

Good luck. This is my third try and I'm not sure I should not have built it over the chassis.

heinke 12-09-2018 02:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RockHillWill (Post 151393)
It took me a while to come to the conclusion that if you are going to have a useable, lasting wooden egg crate buck, cheap will rule that out. I tried several kinds of plywood and none of it turned out to work well for me. It split, drew moisture, split when I hit on it with a hammer, etc. Water from the water jet leaves a mild surface stain that rubs right off, but water has no effect on it that I have seen to date, and some of my Model A bucks are 14 years old
When I was in racing, one of the Ford factory chassis builders and parts suppliers had a sign at his sales counter that said "speed costs money, how fast do you want to go". It was, and still Is, sound logic. You will get what you pay for.

As always, this is just an opinion from an old guy!

Will: thanks for the straight shooting feedback. I do understand your point and appreciate you have a lot more experience with station bucks than I. So I am really listening and acting on your input. My dilemma is that I'm basically making a one time use buck. I'm trying to balance the investment in cost with the needed serviceability to get a good outcome. In other words, I'm not trying to be cheap but on the other hand don't want to over engineer it either.

heinke 12-09-2018 02:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vroom (Post 151462)
I built a square tube frame just smaller than the outside surface. (rigid and light weight) Then I covered it with 1/4" baltic birch plywood (very stable and stiff)
Then I cut away the inside surface of my 1/4" baltic birch buck stations and glued them to the plywood box using small wood blocks as reenforcement. Finally I coated the whole thing with polyurethane floor finish. This made a light and stable buck for most of my car.

Any highly sculpted area (around the headlights etc.) I ended up building up solid with MDF (1/2" and 1/4" layers) and filing and smoothing with pattern makers filler and coating with epoxy. I bolted this final piece to the steel frame. It only describes the first 8" of my car but weighs more than the rest of my buck.

Good luck. This is my third try and I'm not sure I should not have built it over the chassis.

Tim: thanks for sharing. Do you have pictures you can post? For the solid buck pieces, are you using it as a hammer form?

I ask because my plan right now is to have solid areas on my buck for front and rear grill openings, headlight openings, hood vents, and an indented body line that runs length of the hood. I plan to use these solid areas as hammer forms such that I get accurate, symmetrically placed openings.

I'm having these hammer form areas designed into the buck stations and will have CNC instructions such that they can be formed/shaped on a CNC router.

Why did you go with 1/4" buck stations? Are they stable enough to give you accurate feedback on panel fit?

vroom 12-11-2018 11:02 AM

I don't have many fotos. In the first one you can see where the 1/4" stations are doubled where the buck comes apart. The wire is for clipping partial panels to when forming The second foto shows the built up stations before I filled them with model makers filler and sanded them smooth for use as a hammer buck.

Well I you can see some fotos when I can figure out how to post them.

vroom 12-11-2018 01:57 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Here are the fotos:

heinke 12-12-2018 11:47 AM

Station buck thoughts
 
So it came time to start the CAD part of the buck making project. To make sure I wasn't giving confusing or ambiguous direction to Dan (the guy doing the CAD work), I decided to write down my thoughts/needs. I've found the process of putting words on paper (so to speak) forces me to think things through and verbalize what's going on in my head. Here's what I came up with:

Modern-day Miura Station Buck
Objectives
1. A tool that can be used to provide reliable and repeatable surface information for the Miura body. By surface information I mean body skin shape, placement and measurements from “known” reference points like ground, axle centerlines, windshield, etc. Contour gauges can be lofted from buck stations for purpose of designing and fabricating inner body structures.
2. A tool for verification of body panel shape and form. Body panels can be placed against buck during shaping to verify their fit via visual observation from backside. Buck stations will need “windows” cut in them for visual access.
3. I have constrained workspace in my garage. For short periods of time, I can free up enough space for a full sized station buck but not for the duration of body making phase. I’d like the buck to have adaptable modules such that a module can be used separate from other modules but when the buck modules are joined they should do so with reliable indexing.
4. For purposes of symmetry and accuracy, I’d like to hammer form selected body openings on the buck. Examples include front and rear grill openings, headlight openings, and hood vent openings. Perhaps wheel openings but not sure on that one yet. In general, metal shaping will be done off buck and buck is for shape verification. In these selected areas, hammer form modules should be attachable to buck for shaping and flanging these openings. All body panels to be hammer formed will be made from Al 3003, .063 thickness.
5. I work mostly alone and will at times need to move or re-position the buck and/or buck modules. As such, I’d like to keep buck weight manageable by not over engineering it with over sized structural components.
6. One time use. I am a hobbyist and my intent is to make a single Miura. If a second use is needed, a second buck can be cut from CNC files.

Specifications
1. Buck station thickness: ½ inch
2. Transverse buck station placement should be every 8 inches in general. Placement can be closer in places of rapid body shape change or near edge of buck modules and hammer form modules.
3. Buck design should include 5 modules: front clip, rear clip, middle section, drivers side rocker, and passenger side rocker.
4. Longitudinal and transverse station design in the module interface areas must include a means of reliably indexing the buck modules to one another. A design that requires some buck module disassembly and reassembly to join and index modules together is OK. I can foresee use cases where front plus middle modules minus rear module will be needed and likewise middle plus rear modules minus front.

Ideas
1. Special longitudinal members/stations whose only purpose is to accurately index the buck modules to one another. Given the length of the car (i.e. > 8 ft.), the full length longitudinal stations need to be cut from multiple sheets and joined/indexed together anyway.
Here's a graphic showing buck modules in different colors:

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19193

heinke 12-15-2018 12:43 PM

Station buck progress
 
Here's some progress pics of the Miura buck as it's being designed in CAD:

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19195

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19196

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19197

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19198

heinke 01-14-2019 05:12 PM

Station buck progress
 
Progress pic for 3D modeling of station buck.

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19229

sblack 01-16-2019 04:09 PM

mdf or plywood can be cut out with a cnc router. many hobbyists have them (including me) and that would be a lot cheaper than a water jet or laser. Accuracy is more than good enough for a buck.

Jack 1957 01-16-2019 08:57 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Joel, if you're going to use MDF use 3/4" minimum. The size of the panels you'll need are too large for 1/2". Anywhere you're going to screw parts together, insert and glue wood dowels. MDF does not like wood screws.

In the fist first picture below, notice that each station has a printout bonded to it that has the profile of numerous stations printed on it. Meaning that only one or two sheets had to be designed to include station profiles for the whole car. Notice also that you don't see the printouts glued to the right side of the stations. They are probably on the back side to give an exact mirror image. You could also have your inner structures printed on the same sheets, maybe in red or a different color than the outer profiles. Then cut when needed.

The second picture is the Caddy buck I made recently. The edge that the sheet metal will touch. I cut a 45 degree bevel on each side which left only about 1/4" of material that will contact the sheet metal. No need to fair with grinders and sanders.

The last picture is the spine of the same fender buck . Notice that I had to bolt a piece of 1 1/2" angle iron on to stabilize it. The spine is about 7 feet long and just in a couple days of setting on the stand, it started to sag. MDF is pretty stable but it will warp if large spans aren't reinforced.
In long smooth areas I use about 12 to 16 inch spacing. Less in areas with more complex shapes. I was looking at the CGI of your buck design and it appears to have far too many stations. You will be able to see or feel highs and lows between much larger spacings so I think some of the stations on your last drawing aren't needed.
As for using the buck on the ground and on the chassis, if you locate your "windows" carefully to outline the obstructions on the chassis, you might be able to trim the buck quick and easy when you're ready to set it on the chassis by simply cutting a few window frames out. Lifting it without breaking it will probably be one of the major challenges in this operation. Good luck, I'll be watching your progress.

Attachment 51053

Attachment 51054

Attachment 51055

Charlie Myres 01-17-2019 05:35 PM

Very useful post Jack!

For those that don't like large amounts of wood dust – who does? – when the weather allows, do it outside.

I sometimes weld and oxy-cut outside when the season is right, to reduce the inside fire-risk,

Cheers Charlie

heinke 02-08-2019 08:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sblack (Post 152516)
mdf or plywood can be cut out with a cnc router. many hobbyists have them (including me) and that would be a lot cheaper than a water jet or laser. Accuracy is more than good enough for a buck.

Thanks for the suggestion Scott. I'm investigating the CNC router option now.

heinke 02-08-2019 08:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jack 1957 (Post 152524)
Joel, if you're going to use MDF use 3/4" minimum. The size of the panels you'll need are too large for 1/2". Anywhere you're going to screw parts together, insert and glue wood dowels. MDF does not like wood screws.

Jack: I've decided to use 1/2" plywood for station buck. I didn't like the extra weight of MDF and going with 3/4" would just make it even heavier. With plywood, I can also use wood screws.

Thanks for all the helpful info in your post!!

heinke 02-08-2019 08:43 PM

Here are the final 3D designs for the Miura station buck:

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19250

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19251

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19252

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19253

All the stations lay out on 13, 4' by 8' plywood sheets. Here's an example:

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19254

I'm now investigating the best, cost effective method to have these CNC cut. Once cut, the pieces are suppose to slide together where they are notched. This sounds great in theory, we'll see how well this works in practice.

For some of the body openings, I'm planning to have buck mounted hammer forms for turning the flanges. For example, grill, headlight, and hood vent openings. I'm hoping to have these hammer forms shaped on a CNC router from blocks of glued together MDF. We'll see how practical this is.

More updates to come as I figure this puzzle out :)

68rustang 02-26-2019 02:52 PM

Joel,

I just found this thread after somebody mentioned it in your C5GTO thread. How do you have the time for all these awesome projects? :)

I have a 5' x 8' capacity CNC router and would be willing to help you in any way possible if needed. I realize Cleveland Ohio is quite a ways from CA but just wanted to make the offer.

heinke 02-27-2019 03:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 68rustang (Post 153695)
Joel,

I just found this thread after somebody mentioned it in your C5GTO thread. How do you have the time for all these awesome projects? :)

I have a 5' x 8' capacity CNC router and would be willing to help you in any way possible if needed. I realize Cleveland Ohio is quite a ways from CA but just wanted to make the offer.

Eric: I've already committed the job of cutting the buck stations to a local CNC cutting business. I'm still trying to figure out a cost effective way to get the hammer form sections shaped/cut though. Please PM me your contact info if you think you might be able to help with that.

68rustang 02-27-2019 03:59 PM

PM sent.

I have not made it through the whole thread yet so I apologize if its been posted but where did you get the CAD data to make the buck pieces? Did you have access to a car like you did with the C5 GTO? Was it all extrapolated from your modified pictures?

heinke 02-28-2019 12:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 68rustang (Post 153726)
PM sent.

I have not made it through the whole thread yet so I apologize if its been posted but where did you get the CAD data to make the buck pieces? Did you have access to a car like you did with the C5 GTO? Was it all extrapolated from your modified pictures?

Dan Palatnik, dan.palat@gmail.com is the CAD professional who did all the modeling. I started by purchasing a 3D model of a Miura SV from Squir.com. Dan fixed up a few defective details (e.g. wheel openings) on that model to start. He then stretched for longer wheelbase, widen the track, modeled in the Corvette windows, etc. We then iterated a few times to optimize the visual proportions on the upsized Miura. Once we were happy with the look in the 3D model, Dan sliced it and modeled the buck stations from there.

From my experience, I highly recommend Dan Palatnik for this type work. Even though he's remote, he's a great communicator, really knows his stuff, and his services are very reasonably priced.

heinke 03-19-2019 05:15 PM

Station buck progress
 
I've been able to make good progress on the station buck even though I haven't had much time to focus on it. Getting the Ferrari 250 GTO on the road has been the focus of my garage time recently.

For the buck stations, I decided to go Baltic Birch for the plywood. I was able to buy 4' by 8' sheets in 12mm (.472") thickness for $40 a sheet at a local hardwood wholesaler. The plywood is 9 ply in BB/BB surface quality. It took 13 sheets for all the buck stations. I was quoted as high as $52 a sheet at other places.

I investigated CNC laser and CNC router services for the cutting. I went with CNC router as it cost $1,420 versus quotes of $2,000 and $2,500 for CNC laser. These are SF Bay area prices, I would hope that something like this is cheaper outside of CA.

Here's what the station buck looks like when it got home.

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19345

I probably won't get a chance to assemble it for a couple of weeks. In addition, the hammer forms for the front, rear, headlight, and hood openings still are only in digital form. I have found someone to do those but it's still a work in progress.

So here's my observations on the station pieces.
  • The edges are sharp and smooth with no visible splintering. I was worried the CNC router wouldn't provide smooth edges but that worry turned out to be a non-issue.
  • The slotted pieces I tried to fit together, fit snugly with a couple of bumps from the heel of my hand. They certainly aren't loose fitting and may need a rubber hammer for assembly. If too tight, I may need to hit the plywood surface lightly with a belt sander. The slots are .472 and plywood is .472 for the most part. The plywood has some thickness variance where it can be up to a couple of thousands of an inch thicker in places.
  • The slots have rounded corners because the router bit can't cut a square corner. The CNC shop warned me about this and offered to alter the CAD files to add a "dog bone" at the slot ends. At $75/hour to have the 100+ slot ends modified in the CAD file, I opted not to have that done. I can square out the slot ends with a hand file or use a hand router to round over the slot ends on the opposing pieces. I need to round over the edges on buck stations for angled body sections anyway, so hitting the slot ends while I'm at it isn't a big deal.
  • There's lots of pieces and assembly will be like a big jigsaw puzzle. They are all numbered so hopefully that makes it easier to sort out.

More updates to come with progress...

norson 03-20-2019 12:25 AM

Thanks for the update. I've been using the arctic birch for the stuff I'm working on and like the quality and finish. Will follow this thread.

heinke 07-09-2019 07:39 PM

Front clip station buck assembled
 
I finally got a chance to assemble the station buck for the Miura front clip. As you might guess, it's like trying to assemble a big jigsaw puzzle. After some trial and error, it came together and looks great.

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19500

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19501

http://www.allmetalshaping.com/pictu...ictureid=19502

The missing areas like grill, headlight, and vent openings are where hammer forms will go. I'm still working to get the hammer forms shaped/cut.

What I like about it:
  • It's free standing with it's own legs
  • It's lightweight enough that I can slide it around the shop
  • All station intersections easily aligned

In addition, I'm really impressed with the accuracy of going from a CAD model to CNC instructions to cut 1/2" plywood stations. The slots are tight enough to hold stations firmly in place. I used a rubber mallet to tap interlocking stations in place and then a wood screw through the intersections to keep them there.

blue62 07-09-2019 10:12 PM

I enjoy your C5 GTO thread, a great looking car.;)
This one will be a great read also. Keep the update comming:D

Kerry Pinkerton 07-10-2019 09:35 AM

That's the best looking buck I've ever seen!

Superleggera 07-10-2019 10:10 AM

Yeah! I love it when something goes together as planned after much research and planning. It looks good!

heinke 07-11-2019 09:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kerry Pinkerton (Post 156932)
That's the best looking buck I've ever seen!

...and it's safe to say it's the best station buck I've ever worked with! Well it's the first buck I've worked with so best is all relative ;)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:57 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions Inc.