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  #41  
Old 12-22-2014, 12:04 PM
Maxakarudy Maxakarudy is offline
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Originally Posted by AllyBill View Post
Hired in a Faro 3D laser scanner once. It shot 44 million points in 10 minutes and turned out a 3D CAD model in no time flat that could be sliced and diced in AutoCAD. That way you can laser out a minimum number of formers and if you need some extra ones to fill in the blanks you can make those later but starting with only a few at least you can get on the back to see what's what. If it gets away from you, you can always increase the resolution of your tooling to suit the level of panic.

Will
Hi Bill,
Who was the company that did it?
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  #42  
Old 12-22-2014, 12:13 PM
AllyBill AllyBill is offline
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The guy was an independent. He'd bought his own laser and did the job as a sub-contractor but the machine was made by Faro.

http://www.faro.com/products/3d-surveying

The thing will shoot a football stadium or a teacup. Very clever machine.
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  #43  
Old 12-22-2014, 01:47 PM
John Buchtenkirch John Buchtenkirch is offline
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Originally Posted by RockHillWill View Post
I am seeing Pers' viewpoint as well. By making additional pieces, it gives you a clearer understanding of the flow before you actually start on the forming of the panels, and as I learned from my only moderate bucks, the more stations that are there you take fewer shortcuts in the forming and you have the stability to gently use the hammer to make some of the finish forming. I found that strategic locations of the stations worked well for holding the panels in alignment for welding as well. On a buck of this size, it would be my thinking that to get around or inside to look at the fit from the back side would always require another person to hold the panel while you looked.
Will, you hold the panel against the buck with bungee cords, on the smaller panels I mostly do I just set the panel on my bench and lay the buck inside the panel. At Grumman Aerospace where they were doing large panels like radial engine fairings they would have several bungee cords attached permanently at one end to the buck so they could quickly attach & remove parts. I showed the senior hammer man (George Burkhardt) at Grumman some photos of blind bucks and he just laughed and said they wouldn’t work at Grumman. He said every station on a buck represents a stringer or rib that the panels have to be riveted to, so fit-up has to be nearly perfect, you should not be guessing if the panel is touching every station 100% like you have to do with a blind backside type of buck. He was also the person who told me about using shipping band iron with the end bent at an approximate right angle to check for panel to station fit-up. ~ John Buchtenkirch
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  #44  
Old 12-22-2014, 03:13 PM
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RockHillWill RockHillWill is offline
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Those are both good really ideas, John. Thanks for sharing.
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  #45  
Old 12-23-2014, 08:40 AM
VetteMemphis VetteMemphis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Buchtenkirch View Post
Will, you hold the panel against the buck with bungee cords, on the smaller panels I mostly do I just set the panel on my bench and lay the buck inside the panel. At Grumman Aerospace where they were doing large panels like radial engine fairings they would have several bungee cords attached permanently at one end to the buck so they could quickly attach & remove parts. I showed the senior hammer man (George Burkhardt) at Grumman some photos of blind bucks and he just laughed and said they wouldn’t work at Grumman. He said every station on a buck represents a stringer or rib that the panels have to be riveted to, so fit-up has to be nearly perfect, you should not be guessing if the panel is touching every station 100% like you have to do with a blind backside type of buck. He was also the person who told me about using shipping band iron with the end bent at an approximate right angle to check for panel to station fit-up. ~ John Buchtenkirch
So you guys are the ones I can thank for being able to cowl up a stoof by myself on a windy flight line (I was Admiral's aircrew in US-2B and C-1A's).

Great explanation - thanks, John.
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  #46  
Old 12-23-2014, 09:16 AM
jpony645 jpony645 is offline
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The buck alone is a work of art. Can't wait to see the final product. Love the lines on the model, Mike!
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  #47  
Old 12-23-2014, 07:40 PM
Mike Motage Mike Motage is offline
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Thanks Josh, the buck is very usable. Iam using it with little issues. Each rib is held in place by 4 screws, all screws are easy to get at, if I really needed to remove a rib. But so far no problems. I am typically shaping pieces roughly 20"x24" which are all bulbous shapes. Since I start with flat, as I shape the touches in the center until almost completing the panel. When I need to view the backside I just rotate the buck or use a flex mirror. Many times just tapping on the piece will tell if I'mtouching a rib/station. Tink tink = no touch, thuck thuck = touching and means the shape is good in that area. Could this buck could be better, absolutely! This buck was built using simple methods, tools, by myself and is very helpful in achieving the shape and flow I was envisioning.

This isn't a big old aircraft with it's easy gradual shape. This is my vision of a car that I want to build. If it looks good to me that's what I want. This is my passion and I'll build it the way it makes sense to me. If you can gain from this description, great!
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Last edited by Mike Motage; 10-04-2017 at 11:59 AM. Reason: Further explanation
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  #48  
Old 12-26-2014, 08:43 PM
Mike Motage Mike Motage is offline
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Here is view of me standing next to the buck rotated for viewing the fit of a panel. 1226141624.jpg
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  #49  
Old 12-31-2014, 02:50 PM
Cadzook Cadzook is offline
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Thumbs up Hot Rod Jag

Mike, thanks for taking the time to share your project.

As others have noted, I was thinking that by the time your clay was done and the buck was finished, the shape of every panel must have been permanently etched into your brain along with the small details sorted out.

I am anxious to see the finished product. It should be a real attention getter, and a real kick in the pants!

Very cool!
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  #50  
Old 12-31-2014, 04:21 PM
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Z5Roadster Z5Roadster is offline
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Great project, apart from using a rear wing from the buck I made it's laid dormant waiting to be finished, mine was on a 6" grid. Geoff Moss was impressed when I took part to his shop from some wheeling training, was based on



This is a C type Jag buck created by Stuart Brown / Whitney Paine 3Dengineers.
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