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  #21  
Old 01-28-2020, 03:48 AM
Richard Lennard Richard Lennard is offline
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Originally Posted by crystallographic View Post
Hi Bernt,
Been thinking about this one

I like using water way more than sand - even with using a sand rammer I get more satisfaction.
And tubes are clean when done!

Makes nice roll bars and cages, approved by racing safety folks ....

Water is used with fittings that clamp on the tube ends, called swageloks. Put a swagelok on one end and tighten fully.

Make the meniscus rise fully in the other end - w/swagelok and then cap it off tightly.
Make bend with whatever contraption suits (no Yobbos).
ps - can also freeze for more tightness - and then use the ice bending method.

Success and joy,
I will try this method, makes more sense than sand.
Only (small) advantage that I have found with sand, heat to ease bending.
Its done the job but never very tidy (more pilot error than function)
We all know we can buy the premade sections and tig together, they are very neat.
BUT that isnt what this post is about.
I would like to know how!!
On a similar note, I understand annealing alloy whilst working with, amazed me how much softer it became.
However, as it meant to, it workhardens.
What about the bits that remain soft once a panel is completed?
Sorry for including in this thread, hopefully just a one line answer.
Ive googled etc, just nothing convincing,
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  #22  
Old 01-28-2020, 01:48 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Lennard View Post
I will try this method, makes more sense than sand.
Only (small) advantage that I have found with sand, heat to ease bending.
Its done the job but never very tidy (more pilot error than function)
We all know we can buy the premade sections and tig together, they are very neat.
BUT that isnt what this post is about.
I would like to know how!!
On a similar note, I understand annealing alloy whilst working with, amazed me how much softer it became.
However, as it meant to, it workhardens.
What about the bits that remain soft once a panel is completed?
Sorry for including in this thread, hopefully just a one line answer.
Ive googled etc, just nothing convincing,

Hi Richard,
Yeah, I've heated sand-filled tube to bend, but inside that red hot tube the sand melts and adheres to the tube walls - maybe okay ... or not.


I've also bent 2in. steel tube for frame rails, by bending hot with nuttin' inside - just alternating heat on outside of bend to nudge the stretch, and then inside the bend to nudge the compression. Nice results.


Annealing the bend areas ahead of time is very helpful (read: do or fail).


Keeping annealing areas confined is helpful if you cannot then work harden those extra spots later on. Dealing with the old race cars has taught me a lot about even work-hardening during the repair, replace, and patch-up operations - with significant favorable results.
166mm s.n0010 copy.jpg
166MM s.n0010.jpg
( Just gotta love a good slapper and dolly ... and good arms. )

-end-
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Last edited by crystallographic; 01-28-2020 at 02:15 PM.
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  #23  
Old 02-02-2020, 06:59 PM
berntd berntd is offline
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Oh crap,

So I welded most of it together with my tig welder.

But now I saw on Youtube that I was supposed to purge the back of the welds.
Or paint the back with Solarflux B.

I did not do that so I wonder if that is going to be a problem?

This is a cooling water pipe for an engine and the original was made from mild steel. It lasted since 1951.
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  #24  
Old 02-03-2020, 01:35 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Originally Posted by berntd View Post
Oh crap,

So I welded most of it together with my tig welder.

But now I saw on Youtube that I was supposed to purge the back of the welds.
Or paint the back with Solarflux B.

I did not do that so I wonder if that is going to be a problem?

This is a cooling water pipe for an engine and the original was made from mild steel. It lasted since 1951.

It will go until it rusts out.
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  #25  
Old 02-03-2020, 03:27 PM
berntd berntd is offline
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It will go until it rusts out.
Has the lack of back purging made it worse than mild steel or is it just a little worse than stainless?
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  #26  
Old 02-04-2020, 12:20 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Has the lack of back purging made it worse than mild steel or is it just a little worse than stainless?

"Sugar" is the result of leaving stainless exposed to air when welding. It is a rough aglomeration of crystals that impedes flow, measurably.

-And with this surface the Fe in the stainless is now free to become rusty.
Maybe try applying a galv coating to the inside?
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