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  #11  
Old 12-22-2017, 12:47 AM
Mr fixit Mr fixit is offline
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Hi Mike,

Great analogy of the white pine lumber to sheet metal. I will look the next time I'm at the welding shop to see what might be softer and available.
Appreciate the comment.

TX
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  #12  
Old 12-22-2017, 02:23 PM
Mike Rouse Mike Rouse is online now
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Look for wire with a lower yield strength sheetmetal has a yield strength of 30000 psi to 50000 psi. That is depending on the condition of the sheet. But still far below 70000 psi of the weld wire.
I oxy acet weld sheetmetal and mostly fusion weld for the need to add filler metal I use soft annealed rebar tie wire. The o/a welding leaves the weld annealed making stretching the weld doable
Mike
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  #13  
Old 12-22-2017, 06:58 PM
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Mike
I did a quick google search for low carbon mig wire, and also for lower tensile mig wire. No results. Seems all that is available is 70,000. -3 or -6

Steve
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  #14  
Old 12-22-2017, 08:54 PM
Mike Rouse Mike Rouse is online now
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HI Steve. I think that is the case.
I had a couple of spools of "12 ga shotgun" I think that is the name it had an inner core of iron powder. I did not find that was any better than 70s.
Mike
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  #15  
Old 12-22-2017, 09:10 PM
Mr fixit Mr fixit is offline
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Hi Guys,

Sounds like I need to do some self teaching to OA sheet metal and maybe put the MIG torch away for other work, then practice on the sheet metal I'm working with now.
I have a Miller Syncrowave 250 older style TIG machine combo, but the water cooler is dead so it's out of commission for trying it for a while. Another project waiting.

I will try the re bar tie wire idea to practice with too. It's already annealed as purchased correct?

TX
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  #16  
Old 12-23-2017, 12:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr fixit View Post
Hi Guys,

Sounds like I need to do some self teaching to OA sheet metal and maybe put the MIG torch away for other work, then practice on the sheet metal I'm working with now.
I have a Miller Syncrowave 250 older style TIG machine combo, but the water cooler is dead so it's out of commission for trying it for a while. Another project waiting.

I will try the re bar tie wire idea to practice with too. It's already annealed as purchased correct?

TX
The black tie wire / mechanics wire is soft and comes on a spool or in rolls. It isn't that the wire is annealed that makes welding with it softer, as when it goes molten the metal has long since lost any shred of temper/hardness.
The alloy of the wire is malleable, which helps the weld stay workable - unless you throw water on it to quench the weld..... - not recommended.

I've had my tiggy machine on a constant-loss water hose for many years. It drains into the garden and keeps the frogs in fine voice.
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  #17  
Old 12-23-2017, 02:31 PM
Mike Rouse Mike Rouse is online now
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Chris the annealed wire just makes the wire easier to handle. Like unspooling it.
Inorder to prepair the wire for use, I unroll about 15 feet of it. Clamp one end in your vise and grab the other end with big vise grips and pull on the wire. Pulling the wire will stretch the wire straight. Then using wire cutters cut to your favorite length. Easy to make a bunch in a few minutes The yield strength is in the 30000psi to 40000psi it is quite malleable makes for "soft" welds.
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  #18  
Old 12-23-2017, 03:13 PM
Mr fixit Mr fixit is offline
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Hi Mike,

Perfect I have a roll lying around in the shop somewhere and I'm off for the holiday, so I'm hoping to get time in the shop and will definitely try what you suggest.

TX
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  #19  
Old 12-23-2017, 08:02 PM
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18ga. tie wire is .047"dia. with approx. breaking strength of 75 lb.
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  #20  
Old 12-25-2017, 10:46 PM
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Mike and others
When you refer to black tie wire are you referring to safety wire?
Also, are you using it with tig or mig?

Thanks - Phil
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