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  #11  
Old 05-21-2014, 05:19 AM
Dave Deyton Dave Deyton is offline
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Good post.
I will have to make some.

Thanks for posting.

Dave
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  #12  
Old 05-21-2014, 05:30 AM
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Frank.de.Kleuver Frank.de.Kleuver is offline
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Could it be a cobra hoodscoop?

I have the dimensions somewhere.

I'll start searching for the materials to make the tucking tool.

Greetings,

Frank
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  #13  
Old 05-21-2014, 11:55 AM
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Thanks for the input guys. I wasn't sure if this would get any traction.

Thanks Frank. If you have the drawing of the scoop I would love to get it from you. I have the panel breakdown of the Cobra but there are no dimensions.

After we get a few photos of this project we will get onto the beater bag.

Thanks again.

Jere
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  #14  
Old 05-21-2014, 12:39 PM
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I'm in too!

I don't have a harbor freight around but I have a lathe. I'll turn some forks up. If I understand it correctly, the biggest diameter of the tapered parts is 1/2 so they can tilt in the 9/16 hole when you clamp the 1/8 piece between. Is that right? Is an overall length of 5" good?

Great way to get people moving!
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  #15  
Old 05-21-2014, 12:59 PM
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Richard K Richard K is offline
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Jere, Great tutorial.

We need to remember that new people are always coming on board so these basic things are forever timely.

Stefan, the HF pry bars seem to be tough steel. That's one of the advantages. To make your own try to find good steel. Maybe an automobile tie rod or a long cylinder head bolt.
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  #16  
Old 05-21-2014, 01:04 PM
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Frank.de.Kleuver Frank.de.Kleuver is offline
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I'll make a fsp and draw up to curves of the plastic scope I have laying around.

This afternoon both my kids were free from school so I took them to my shop. We used some pins we found in a salvage yard.

My son did a lot himself. He even did some welding on it. The bigger holes were drilled by me.

Blending the tips


Blended pins ready to be shortened


Cutting the base plate


Base materials


Centerpunching


Ready to drill. I did the drilling for safety reasons.


All welded up. Bram even did some mig welding. He loved it.


First tuck.


Works like a charme


Thanks for this thread. We'll try to contribute all the way.

Frank and Bram
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  #17  
Old 05-21-2014, 01:17 PM
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Stefan: You are correct in that the size of the hole must be large enough to allow the tapered pins to be parallel with the 1/8" spacer between them. Keeping this in mind you can use any diameter parent material you have handy. The pins can be any length you wish from 2" to 5 or 6". Like Richard said, use the best material you can get. Mild steel = short pins.

Thanks Richard K for getting this ball rolling. Always pleased with your input. Any input will be greatly appreciated.

Jere
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  #18  
Old 05-21-2014, 01:27 PM
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Thanks for posting Frank:

That was a great idea to print out my pictures and take them to the shop.

If nothing else comes from this thread it was worth seeing a father and son working together in the shop. GOOD ON YOU.

Tucks look just right. Lets see them hammered out so others can see the finished results.

Jere
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  #19  
Old 05-21-2014, 02:20 PM
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Kerry Pinkerton Kerry Pinkerton is offline
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Here is a slightly different approach that doesn't require drilling the base.

We take the same HF pry bars, cut off the claw feet and smooth the pointed ends on a belt sander. Try to get them as smooth as possible so they will slid on the metal not grip it. If they grip they will cause the metal to stretch instead of bending.

I don't have any photos of the inprocess building but basically we just stick them inside a piece of 2x2 tubing. In this early version, I was using a short piece. Shortly thereafter, we migrated to a 6" piece and that seemed to work well. We just clamp a piece of 1/8 material between and MIG weld them inside the 2x2. At the top, you'll have a pretty bit gap to plug but MIG is good for filling gaps.

We also weld between them look by my thumb in the photo below. Again, a big gap but it really strengthens them. Much over 4" unsupported and they will bend while in use.

tucking-tool.jpg

We use 2x2 because we make bag stands with a 2x2 socket on them. We have a variety of post dollies and other things that fit in the socket.

stand.jpg

It's much easier to put one foot on the base of the bag stand (if necessary) and make the tucks.

To my knowledge, my personal contribution to the art of shaping metal was the creation of stand mounted tucking forks. I came up with the idea back in 2001 after trying to get enough leverage on the traditional T handled forks.

makingtucks.jpg

I've also made them from large punches. They appear to be better steel and have hex shanks and a better taper on them.
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  #20  
Old 05-21-2014, 02:58 PM
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Excellent Kerry I was hoping to see variations on the theme.

As I stated in the beginning these will probably not be the last pair you will make. More information please!!!

I know Kerry isn't the only one with forks, lets see some more.

Jere
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