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  #11  
Old 06-25-2016, 02:51 PM
Rick Mullin Rick Mullin is offline
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I have just recently tried pressing a few small shapes as Kent suggests. It is very effective.

My only caution is again about matching the contour of the badge. The badge and fender rarely match which is the cause for the three studs pulling off the back of the badge. I have soldered many studs back on. The factory additionally uses double back tape to help with this problem. If you can match contours, it makes your life much easier.

Evaluate the fit of the badge before casting a mold. Perhaps a minor adjustment of the surface could be made with a bit of plastic filler before making the mold.
Rick
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  #12  
Old 06-25-2016, 06:36 PM
longyard longyard is offline
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Rick,
I believe that for a while Ferrari went to a one-bolt system to attach the bonnet badges. I guess that was cheaper than have new batches of badges cast for every change in bonnet design between the models.
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  #13  
Old 06-26-2016, 02:35 PM
Rick Mullin Rick Mullin is offline
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Ferrari did go to a one bolt hood badge but the fender badges had three studs that were soldered on after firing and before plating. The hood badges are the same overall dimension but vary in detail and construction over the years (never try to pass off a new badge on an old Ferrari). Some of the older badges have become very valuable. I made a steel press die for the hood badge years ago and it is still usable on current models (fits old Dino badges as well). The change to single stud is really a function of limited access to the back of the badge on the newer cars and the advent of double back tape which allows for the single stud.
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  #14  
Old 06-26-2016, 06:53 PM
longyard longyard is offline
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Thanks Rick. Yes, it gets complicated! And these are just from the 40s!

IMG_5574.jpg
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  #15  
Old 07-05-2016, 03:06 PM
Scott Turner Scott Turner is offline
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Hi Guys, First I would like to thank all for there advise on how to tackle this job.

I am still waiting on the customer supplying a set of badges as the car doesn't currently have them. The wing in the initial picture was purchased second hand.
Anyway I have been playing with this in my spare time. What I have done is make a mould using body filler.

bondo mould.jpg

I then cut two pieces of 3mm steel plate and bent them to the curve of the wing luckily the wing is dead flat front to back around the recess. I used the mould to cut the recess out of one of pieces and then welded the plates together.

ferrari die.jpg

I will refine the hammer form once I have the badge. Rick your point about the variation of these badges has been noted. In the mean time I have done a test piece.

test piece.jpg

If you look at my test piece it has curled up around the edges of the panel.

Could anybody please tell me should I stretch the panel prior to shaping in the hammer form to give me a little extra material when shaping ? Any other tips would be appreciated.

Scott
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  #16  
Old 07-05-2016, 06:30 PM
AllyBill AllyBill is offline
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I'd just be a little bolder when knocking the shape into the panel. You have gathered the material a little through being timid with your hammer. Hit it harder to stretch where you want to stretch and avoid tucking the surrounding material.

Will
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  #17  
Old 07-05-2016, 06:55 PM
Rick Mullin Rick Mullin is offline
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It is looking good. Just needs some refinement.

I suggest that you mount the base to a curved block of wood that will fully support the part. Clamp it the bench or a heavy steel plate. Then set the outer edge with a flat hammer with light blows. Once the outer edge is defined, stretch the inner area a bit to bottom it out on the die in the open area and up to the inner edge. Then take blunted chisel and slowly work down the inner edge. You do not need to hit it hard but it needs to be backed solidly just like striking something on an anvil verses a wooden block. The series of lighter hits on a well backed surface will allow for more accurate and cleaner work.

If the curvature and depth were much greater, I would be concerned with the fact that you are actually hammering from the wrong side. Because of the curve, you should be stretching the outer edge not the inner. That is why I made a press die in the flat and rolled it after it was formed (see previous post).

Rick
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  #18  
Old 07-06-2016, 04:29 PM
Scott Turner Scott Turner is offline
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Will and Rick thank you for your advise I will post some pictures when I eventually get this done (still waiting on badge)

Scott
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