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  #11  
Old 05-27-2019, 01:22 AM
skintkarter skintkarter is offline
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Originally Posted by fciron View Post
In my relatively recent experience you don't see a nice shiny puddle the way you do with steel. So, don't worry about that.

The expensive blue filters do make it easier to see what's going on. I thought I was seeing just fine through my green shade five until I tried one of the aluminum welding filters and it's a huge difference. You'll see the puddle then.

I agree thevlack of penetration sounds like not enough heat I tilt the torch more when welding aluminum than for steel, because that's what I was taught and it seems to work. I know that the higher conductivity of aluminum means it often needs more heat than the low temperatures involved suggest. I think aiming the flame more in the direction of travel spreads the heat over a larger area, countering the conductive loss without burning through right under the torch. (Hopefully. ;-) )
Thanks Lewis - just been having a play this afternoon and the larger tip certainly is helping.

20190527_151705.jpg

20190527_181347.jpg
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  #12  
Old 05-27-2019, 12:58 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skintkarter View Post
Thanks Lewis - just been having a play this afternoon and the larger tip certainly is helping.

Attachment 52951

Attachment 52953
Richard, Your technique is looking better.
Try working in 2-3inch stretches, then extend filler rod and go again.
Inner cone is a nickel thickness from the metal.
45deg angle is "average" but can go down to 20deg with hotter flame/thinner material.
A quick twist of the wrist flicks the flame up off the weld to cool, then right back down to weld. You can dab filler and flame synchronous or alternating then when "sag" appears you flick the flame to cool, and then back in the dance.
Aircraft weld inspectors could ID each welder by the "fingerprint" of their welds. Rare welders can copy other weld styles enough to blend repairs right in.

90 deg is max heat - for tacking or starting up.
Back-cracking from edge of panel is from welding in from edge- always start welding from 2nd tack on aluminum, and then go back and weld out to edge that inch or so.
Which eyewear are you using?

Work with rhythm. Waltz music (Blue Danube) has a great pace to weld aluminum with.
Books have been written about this .... (NOT Finch, though)
Keep practicing,
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  #13  
Old 05-28-2019, 06:14 AM
skintkarter skintkarter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystallographic View Post
Richard, Your technique is looking better.
Try working in 2-3inch stretches, then extend filler rod and go again.
Inner cone is a nickel thickness from the metal.
45deg angle is "average" but can go down to 20deg with hotter flame/thinner material.
A quick twist of the wrist flicks the flame up off the weld to cool, then right back down to weld. You can dab filler and flame synchronous or alternating then when "sag" appears you flick the flame to cool, and then back in the dance.
Aircraft weld inspectors could ID each welder by the "fingerprint" of their welds. Rare welders can copy other weld styles enough to blend repairs right in.

90 deg is max heat - for tacking or starting up.
Back-cracking from edge of panel is from welding in from edge- always start welding from 2nd tack on aluminum, and then go back and weld out to edge that inch or so.
Which eyewear are you using?

Work with rhythm. Waltz music (Blue Danube) has a great pace to weld aluminum with.
Books have been written about this .... (NOT Finch, though)
Keep practicing,
Thanks for your continuing input Kent. Unfortunately I've regressed today when I got clear of the office - a complete shambles. Head probably not in the right space. Just like when we were developing insurance CRM software, I need to retreat to the known parameters from the previous working model and then change one thing at a time until I understand what breaks it.

In terms of eyewear, my current choice is a #6 face shield. Today I tried my fairly decent tig hat on 6 -7 and also a Sellstrom Blue #6 lens which a mate gave me to try in my old flip front goggles. Both the tig hat and the Sellstom lens were horrible. Particularly the flip front jobbie. I wear graduated prescription glasses all of the time now (I was warned as a teenager...) and it seems that the goggles now just don't suit where the looky closey bits are on my glasses. It was reminiscent of my rash purchase of a new Shoei Italian liveried helmet to match my third childhood Ducati Panigale. Unfortunately the helmet was slightly too large and trying to look up and through the tight turns our geriatric gang favours, started to move the glasses around on my head. The effect was very much as somebody once described an acid trip to me - definitely not conducive to cornering and staying out of the undergrowth.

So long answer, but the face shield is markedly better for me than the other two options and in hindsight, I can actually see what is happening with the puddle fairly well by comparison.

I did wonder if I would struggle going back to the welding goggles, which is the main reason I held off getting a set from you.

I might just park things for a few days until I receive the DVD and flux from you and then have another try.

In the meantime I can wimp out and tack up the front splitter bits with the tig to allow me to continue with the panel fabrication.

I will report back once I have another go.

Thanks again Kent.
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  #14  
Old 05-28-2019, 08:38 AM
bobadame bobadame is offline
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A couple of thoughts that might be useful to you. I also wear progressive lenses but not when welding. I use a cheap pair of reading glasses under my Tinman goggles so that I don't have to constantly tip my head back to see the puddle. When I TIG weld I use a cheater lens in the helmet along with the reading glasses.
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  #15  
Old 05-28-2019, 12:46 PM
norson norson is offline
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When I first took a tig class I had tried-focals and could not see a thing. The same thing you experienced. I had prescription read only glasses made and solved the problem. Off the shelf readers assume both eyes are the same and have only one focal distance. This didn't work for me.
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  #16  
Old 05-28-2019, 03:02 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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If you can't see, then you can't weld.


Bifocals, trifocals, multi-focal glasses are a complete waste of time, and effort - but a great source of frustration. So say a LOT of finally-successful welders.

- And why do you need multi-focal vision inside a welding headgear, anyway?
All of your welding will be done at one distance, like reading a book.
(Assuming you are not wanting to drive your vehicle while wearing all of your welding gear ... right?)


So, dedicate a pair of (cheap) reading glasses for welding. You can also part with some clams and get a "cheater" lens for inside your welding headgear.
And then add the reading glasses inside the headgear for welding in dark corners ..... or for super detail.


Charlie Rosa.jpg
ps - my old buddy Charlie Rosa had poor eyesight - learned to weld at 83 yrs old - and made up this contraption to weld with - and became a very good aluminum gas welder! (+6 diopters.)



- end of diatribe -
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  #17  
Old 05-28-2019, 08:27 PM
fciron fciron is offline
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I use this with the aluminum welding lens installed. I find it works over my glasses quite nicely. http://www.tinmantech.com/products/s...s-headgear.php

But, yeah, It would be great if someone came out with an aluminum welding filter for a faceshield.

Lewis
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  #18  
Old 05-28-2019, 09:30 PM
skintkarter skintkarter is offline
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Thanks Guys.

Kent - have just placed another order for all of the eyewear gear, flux cup, brushes and 2 kinds of wire.

No excuses shortly!
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  #19  
Old 05-29-2019, 05:09 AM
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neilb neilb is offline
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looking good richard, you'll be welding the body parts together pretty quick soon
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  #20  
Old 05-29-2019, 10:52 PM
skintkarter skintkarter is offline
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Originally Posted by neilb View Post
looking good richard, you'll be welding the body parts together pretty quick soon
Cheers Neil - still a long way from where I'd be happy to attack a real panel. Have just ordered an armful of stuff from Kent and a DVD - 'O/A Ali for Really Stupid People' so theoretically I should have no excuses other than complete and total operator ineptitude.

What I have realised though is that my gas welding tips have seen better days, so I'll need to track some new ones down. Of course NZIG have discontinued my little Colt torch and you can bet your bum that the no doubt Chinese sourced replacement tips (sorry 'blowpipes') will be completely incompatible with the rest of the rig. 'What do you expect Sir, you did buy this one 40 years ago...'

Enough of my whining, there are panels to make.
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