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  #1  
Old 10-12-2018, 11:01 PM
Steve Hackel Steve Hackel is offline
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Default H.F. & other cheap bead rollers

If one is to modify a Harbor freight bead roller (or other similar style) where would you go to buy a matching rear gear to modify the unit for the feature of a sliding shaft? Since every one of these seems to originate from the same source over seas, would it be fair to assume that all the gears would be the exact same size and style? Thanks, Steve
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Old 10-13-2018, 12:14 AM
Mike Rouse Mike Rouse is offline
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Well you can move from the center of both gears forward one half the gear width and then again from the center of both gears move rearward one half the gear width without an additional gear. This will provide a gear width of movement. May be enough movement.
This is the way I built mine. Pictures in my album.

Mike
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  #3  
Old 10-13-2018, 08:50 AM
rustreapers rustreapers is offline
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Default bead roller two in one!!

Just buy a second bead roller. I had two HF rollers that I combined into one.
I got:
2 body plates for stiffening.
3 gears for sliding.
Extra long shaft for sliding.
Extra beads to re-machine to new beads.
The WOODFAB for $125.00 are a good start.
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  #4  
Old 10-14-2018, 04:16 AM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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I just used two as well. Good source of parts like above.
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  #5  
Old 10-15-2018, 12:50 AM
Steve Hackel Steve Hackel is offline
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Yes, "WE" have thought about that option already, but two of us doing the exact same build and needing to buy two more of the HF style rollers plus 2 times the shipping just seems to be a little bit of over kill. I already have the steel plates for the sides, so that is just a matter of boring a hole in the plate and then using my band saw to open the throats to match the existing units we have. Buying the second pair of bead rollers only duplicates the number and styles of the sets of dies we already own.... redundant I guess but not really needed. I admit that I was just being cheap in trying to buy 2 additional gears and go from there but I had nothing to loose in asking
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Old 10-15-2018, 03:46 PM
longyard longyard is offline
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Steve,
I've posted this before, but here it is again:


Here's a run down of what you need to do. I've attached photos as well.

1) The HF, Eastwood, Woodward Fab, etc. machines are all the same. The first mod necessary is to stiffen the "arms" using "C" channel, NOT "V" channel, or angle iron. "C" channel allows you to add a simple sliding depth stop so you can set the depth of beads in a panel.

2) Once you weld on the "C" channel you MUST join the ends of the pieces to create a small "box" (This is at the very back of the throat, see photos). By joining the top and bottom channel with a connecting piece and forming a small "box", you now have prevented the arms from "torqueing" when under load. In engineering terms you have created a "torque box". Remarkably simple, but if you don't do this, the arms will still splay apart.

3) Add lifting springs and an adjusting bolt with a long arm as per the photos. Easy, but a real time saver in the real world. I never tighten down the 17mm bolt anymore, so the upper rod can be raised and lowered by the adjusting bolt alone (See photos). Happiness is working quickly and without the need to find extra tools. NOTE: Use HIGH PRESSURE grease on this adjusting bolt.

4) The motor: What you DON'T want to have are exposed gears, chains, pulleys, etc., like you see on some homemade designs. They are DANGEROUS. I took out one of my roller bars, chucked it in a lathe and put a 1/2" hole about 1" deep into it. The motor shaft now slips into that hole and is held in place by a bolt that comes in at 90 degrees. See photo. If you don't have a lathe, it is worth taking it to a shop that can drill this hole for you. Takes only a couple of minutes and is an easy set up. DON'T DO IT ANY OTHER WAY.

5) The motor is wired to a switch which can reverse polarity, thus direction, very easily. The motor speed controller is a simple old-fashioned sewing machine pedal that I got for a few dollars from a thrift store.

6) The motor is a Dayton 1LRA7. DON'T GET ANY OTHER KIND. Typically on eBay or from Irvan-Smith:
https://www.irvansmith.com/scart/irv...tor-p-381.html



I have looked an dozens of bead rollers available from around the world and I don't think there is any "middle choice" between modifying one of these cheapie Chinese machines and buying either the best Baileigh/RMD, or Lazze Jansson machine. When I modded my machine I got the motor from Irvan-Smith for $150. The price is almost double now, but still well-worth it. If you don't modify your machine, the next best move is to spend $6K to $9K on a Baileigh or Lazze. Anything else just doesn't work that well.



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  #7  
Old 10-16-2018, 11:10 PM
timothale timothale is offline
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Default Grease zerks.

my son did some metal sculpture with heavier gage metal and it gaulled the shafts. I bought some V belt pullies with the metric bore size to match and easier start to make custom shapes
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  #8  
Old 10-16-2018, 11:20 PM
timothale timothale is offline
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Default repair parts

I have bought repair parts from haror freight. do they sell the replacement gears ?
For technical questions and replacement parts, please call 1-800-444-3353.
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  #9  
Old 10-17-2018, 03:42 AM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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If I had been starting from scratch I would have also bought this small one from Eastwood as most plate ones don't come with the art or offset dies. To buy them separately would cost almost the same.

https://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-el...ad-roller.html

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