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  #1  
Old 02-20-2019, 09:08 AM
ojh ojh is offline
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Default Special lens for TIG welding sheetmetal?

Is there an extra light gradient lens for welding sheetmetal? The amperage is so low that it isn't bright enough to illuminate the seam. I use a traditional shield but have checked the self darkening and the lowest setting is still a -8.
What do you guys do?
Thanks, Oj
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Old 02-20-2019, 10:36 AM
John Buchtenkirch John Buchtenkirch is offline
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Magnifiers in the helmet and extra illumination on the weld but occasionally I still wonder off the panel split. Hope to try the helmet mounted lights someday but sadly at 70 my best tig welds were probably 10 or 15 years agoÖÖ eyes are not so great anymore . Started tig welding late (fortyish) because I couldnít afford a tig before then so Iím sure there are many welders here much better than myself. ~ John Buchtenkirch
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Old 02-20-2019, 12:29 PM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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I thought my Spedglass auto darkening lens was no longer any good. I've had it for about 20 yrs and couldn't see a thing anymore when I used it. Changed batteries, Tried adjusting to a lighter setting, adding extra lighting but still didnt fix things.

then I learned about the change in focal length that goes along with getting older. My eyes needed to be a different distance from the work now that I'm over 50 than when I was younger. Once I moved my head to a different distance, the puddle/kernel was easy to see- like going from near pitch black to normal. There was nothing wrong with my auto darkening lens. It was me...

Just something to check before you spend $$ on new gear, especially if you're not a young guy anymore. Magnifiers and adequate light do help. Good luck.
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Old 02-20-2019, 01:04 PM
ojh ojh is offline
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Yes, I have the magnifyer lens and have attached a powerful LED headlamp to my shield but there must be a better way. Yes, we're all older but we don't have a problem welding steelplates together because of the brighter light that the shield are designed to filter. It is the 18ga that we don't use enough power to brighten things up, I have an analog machine and its probably under 30amps to weld body panels.
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Old 02-20-2019, 01:04 PM
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Steve Hamilton Steve Hamilton is offline
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I agree with all of the above!
I have bi focal glasses, and discovered that when looking through the helmet I was not able to look down through the reading (magnification) part of the lens.

After talking to the eye doctor, he suggested a special pair of glasses that have the reading prescription for the complete lens.
Is also have correction for stigmatizing included in them.

I use a 2.0 magnifier in the helmet and the new special glasses, itís now like big screen TV!

The negative is that there is a set focal length. If the helmet is too close or far away from the puddle, the focus is gone.
I find it is much easier to weld when you can clearly see the puddle, not just a blue glow!!!!

If you donít wear glasses buy some cheap readers and a magnifier lens for the helmet. Less than $10.00

Buy a new cover glass (plastic) for the outside of the helmet. If it is scratched the light is scattered like a bunch of prizes.

Hope this helps!

Steve
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Old 02-20-2019, 02:08 PM
norson norson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Hamilton View Post
I agree with all of the above!
I have bi focal glasses, and discovered that when looking through the helmet I was not able to look down through the reading (magnification) part of the lens.

After talking to the eye doctor, he suggested a special pair of glasses that have the reading prescription for the complete lens.
Is also have correction for stigmatizing included in them.

I use a 2.0 magnifier in the helmet and the new special glasses, it’s now like big screen TV!

The negative is that there is a set focal length. If the helmet is too close or far away from the puddle, the focus is gone.
I find it is much easier to weld when you can clearly see the puddle, not just a blue glow!!!!

If you don’t wear glasses buy some cheap readers and a magnifier lens for the helmet. Less than $10.00

Buy a new cover glass (plastic) for the outside of the helmet. If it is scratched the light is scattered like a bunch of prizes.

Hope this helps!

Steve
Steve
I discovered the prescription reader answer while taking a TIG class at the community college, but I wasted three weeks of the class before I figured it out. I talked about it before, but you describe it much better. My situation might have been even worse because I have tri-focals. I can't imagine how confusing veri-lenses would be. I also use a magnifier in the helmet. AND a light on the hemet.
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Old 02-20-2019, 03:10 PM
Kevinb71 Kevinb71 is offline
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I have progressive lens in my glasses. When i was taking a TIG class i just couldn't do it! Was very frustrating as I could always weld before. Then i took my glasses off and suddenly I could see what I was trying to weld. I think the comments above about reading glasses and "cheaters" or magnifiers will help too. I just bought some that fit my helmet.
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Old 02-20-2019, 05:00 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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What is the color of your lens? Gray? Brown? Blue?
Color makes a visible difference.
I use a green S10 for my thin tig welding. And a 2.0D magnifier in the hat.
For some work I also add readers, 2.5 or so.
I hate bifocals and trifocals - silly to use them when you won't be looking across the parking lot or driving the car with your welding helmet on.
Use eyewear appropriate to the task.
Surgeons have their glasses set, prescribed and dedicated for surgical work - no bi-tri-focals there - AT ALL. (And I think patients are glad their surgeon isn't twisting and tilting his head while cussing his vision during surgery....??)
We take good vision for granted - and are then at a loss when things change with age ... and the struggle to see becomes a major event in the shop.
I've watched this welding-vision struggle for decades in the shops, and even though I make recommendations specifically to help, some folks will stay stubborn for another two years before unbelting $12.clams for simple pharmacy-grade reading glasses, and being able to weld easily, once again.
sigh.
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Old 02-20-2019, 07:39 PM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ojh View Post
Yes, I have the magnifyer lens and have attached a powerful LED headlamp to my shield but there must be a better way. Yes, we're all older but we don't have a problem welding steelplates together because of the brighter light that the shield are designed to filter. It is the 18ga that we don't use enough power to brighten things up, I have an analog machine and its probably under 30amps to weld body panels.
Fwiw, I discovered and solved this problem while TIG welding 18g-20g sheet crs. Even without any magnifiers to see things more clearly, simply adjusting my posture to resolve focal length was all it took for me to go from dark & cannot see to a well-lit & easily seen operation. moving closer when you cannot see because it was so dark was instinctual. Never imagined backing away would make it brighter and easier to see.

After that, welding 1/4" plate steel was easier as well.
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  #10  
Old 02-21-2019, 12:42 AM
Mr fixit Mr fixit is offline
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Something that I got years ago when taking trade welding classes before the auto darkening helmets, was a gold color lens, it reflects well and gives a better color to the weld when working the low amps of sheet metal and TIG.
Just one persons experience but thought it might be food for thought.

TX
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