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  #31  
Old 11-29-2014, 02:49 PM
Johnny C. Johnny C. is offline
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Hi David, I was given proper instruction in the handling of oxyacetylene welding equipment in a 10th grade metal shop glass. My instructor took a no nonsense approach; and after 48 years as a fabricator/welder I am proud to say that the only accident I have ever had with gas welding was touching something I forgot was hot. Thanks to everyone here (but especially to you and Peter) my metalshaping skills are steadily improving. Please continue posting. Don't make those who gain so much from your contribution lose out because of a few careless comments. Thanks Again,
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  #32  
Old 11-29-2014, 06:02 PM
Doug M Doug M is offline
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David and All,

I very much appreciate this reminder of the potentials of fire and explosion from the (mis)use of OA torch. perhaps those that sell this type of system AND all systems need teach safety more and we wouldn't have the type of accidents I've read about in OSHA reports and such. maybe there would be a few sales lost but we'd have fewer "accidents".

Thank you David, I'll take the reminder graciously partly because I have to much to loose.
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  #33  
Old 12-01-2014, 12:58 PM
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nonhog nonhog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Gardiner View Post
Thanks guys for your interest.

I think this could have been a good resource.

David
It is a good resource. I'm one of those guys who have a set up but yet to use it. I feel if I can study up (lots of places) I'll understand it best. Was the 70's in JHS last I used a torch. Back then I was brazing.

Lots of us appreciate the information. And some like the snarky humor and some don't. No bigs.

Thanks David!
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  #34  
Old 12-02-2014, 12:15 AM
weldtoride weldtoride is offline
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Default Written word vs. spoken word, and nuance

First of all: congrats David, on being named shaper of the Month.

One of the problems with the digital age of written only communications is that we cannot read each others' faces nor hear each others' inflections and so nuance is absent. We each read posts with our own inner voices adding missing visual and auditory clues and so we fill in the blanks with our own prejudiced nuance.

Although I personally find emoticons distracting, I realize others use them to clarify, and I do see their point perfectly.

All this said, I have followed this thread very carefully. During the course of my high school teaching career, beginning in 1975, I have instructed literally several hundred teenagers, aged 14 and up, to use O/A torches safely, among other welding processes.

I think David is doing admirably in providing info for beginners, many of whom don't know where to go for reliable information. Personally, I would have linked to several outside sources to support my procedures in my discourse, but David speaks with a very understandable voice, and his information is sound.

As a frequent, longtime, and thorough reader of this forum, I feel I have developed a sense of various frequent posters' voices here. I recognize a certain sense of dry humor in Kent's post in this thread, as in so many of his other posts elsewhere, that I think David may have missed.

Forgive me if I have misinterpreted either or both of you.

To me, it's two different points of view, from two very different people, who also have two different cultural backgrounds when it comes to humor/humour, including irony.

Again, congrats, David on being named shaper of the Month.

Just my 2 cents
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Last edited by weldtoride; 12-02-2014 at 12:31 AM.
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  #35  
Old 12-02-2014, 01:25 AM
longyard longyard is offline
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Well said Mark. David is a fabulous fabricator who uses traditional English methods, and Kent is a like-wise fabulous fabricator who uses the American style... which, like our country itself, is a melting pot of various influences.

David shows a lot of his work on the forum and we can clearly see how talented he is, but Kent does work which he doesn't show... and in some instances cannot because of the nature of the work and its end-user... Uncle Sam... but I have seen it with my own eyes and his work is indisputably of the highest quality. His customer could afford and choose anyone it wishes, and again and again it chooses the TinManTechnologies.

Cultural differences and misunderstanding humor/humour? As the Brit. George Bernard Shaw said, "We are two countries divided by a common language."
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  #36  
Old 12-08-2014, 08:18 PM
Patrick DeZeeuw Patrick DeZeeuw is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Gardiner View Post
I am going to start from the basics...

To set up for Oxygen and Acetylene welding this is a list of the equipment you will need to get started. The colour of the cylinders may vary depending on your country but the basic set up will be the same.



The cylinders- One of disolved Acetylene and one Oxygen.

The Acetylene cylinder is of steel construction and contains a porous filling which is there to absorb the Acetone used to dissolve the acetylene. This is one of the dangers- an acetylene cylender should never be laid down when in use and it is better not to lay them down at all. If for any reason a cylinder has been laid down it must be stood upright for at least one hour before using it. This is to prevent the Acetone entering the regulators and hose where it becomes a fire risk.

All acetylene cylinders (at least in the UK I imagine this is universal) are protected by at least one safety device designed to relieve pressure if it is subjected to overheating, perhaps in a fire or though a flashback. A flashback can occure if the flame fires buck through the hoses into the cylinder, this can cause the cylinder to heat up. The safety device is usually a plug which will melt over a given temperature.

Here is a link to a PDF on Acetylene safety.

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg327.pdf

The Oxygen cylinder comes in a seemless cylinder and is a non combustable gas. Welding cylinders are supplied with extreemly high pressure so there is still risks involved. Care must be taken not to contaminate the cylinder with any form of oil or grease.

Here is a PDF on the safe use of Oxygen cylinders...

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg327.pdf

There is a lot of information about health and safety regarding welding gasses on the internet, I recommend reading about the risks and safety advice before undertaking any welding. The more you know the safer you will be.

David
thank you for taking the time to share what you know with us begginers. - Zeke DeZeeuw
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  #37  
Old 12-10-2014, 11:22 AM
Patrick DeZeeuw Patrick DeZeeuw is offline
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This may seem to be a stupid question but I am going to ask it any way. Can we talk about tempo? Everything has a rhythm to it and if we can just talk about .050" aluminum sheet for the moment it would be great. My son Zeke is trying to find his "groove". He can do it with steel but aluminum seems to be trying his 11 year olds's patience. Is there a heat saturation point reached with aluminum where you can achieve a consistent tempo for longer welds?
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  #38  
Old 12-10-2014, 01:06 PM
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Frank.de.Kleuver Frank.de.Kleuver is offline
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A stupid question is the one never asked. ;-)

I guess looking at David's video he adds filler rot twice every second. Maybe a bit slower. But I think it is very dependent of a lot of parameters. But it is a nice point of departure. You can humm your favorite song or whatever rocks your boat.

Personally I don't have a ritme but I'm triggered by what I see.

It's a search to what suits you best.

Greeting,

Frank
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  #39  
Old 12-10-2014, 01:48 PM
skintkarter skintkarter is offline
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Just remembered an incident in the 80's when I had a spell at the local steel mill. The place had bulk oxygen plumbed to many production areas of the plant, one being the multi-hearth which I was a maintenance fitter on. Each major area of the plant also had a lubrication station patrolled by the shift lube man ('greaser'). Amongst other things, the station had a 44 gallon drum of grease and an air powered grease pump.

The greaser ran into the fitters shop one morning in a very agitated state saying that a 'bomb had gone off' on the multi-hearth lube station. Indeed it had! Shrapnel everywhere.

Turned out that when the plant was built some 15 years earlier, one of the pipe fitters got the bulk oxygen line and the compressed air line mixed up and the compressed air grease pump had been merrily operating for the last 15 years on pure oxygen. Nobody was hurt and there was no fire.

Thanks for the article David. I leaned to gas weld 40 plus years ago at school and bought my first OA set when I was 14 to try and resurrect a completely rotten 5 quid Morris Minor. It's been downhill ever since! However, I must buy a couple of flashback arrestors.
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  #40  
Old 12-10-2014, 08:27 PM
Patrick DeZeeuw Patrick DeZeeuw is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank.de.Kleuver View Post
A stupid question is the one never asked. ;-)

I guess looking at David's video he adds filler rot twice every second. Maybe a bit slower. But I think it is very dependent of a lot of parameters. But it is a nice point of departure. You can humm your favorite song or whatever rocks your boat.

Personally I don't have a ritme but I'm triggered by what I see.

It's a search to what suits you best.

Greeting,

Frank
Thank you Frank!
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