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  #21  
Old 03-15-2020, 05:46 PM
ken from Peterborough ken from Peterborough is offline
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Originally Posted by crystallographic View Post
Most start by buying a "spinning lathe," and probably not an automatic one.
Find some spinning tools.

Then get a half-inch carriage bolt, chuck it up and spin a copper cover over the head of it. Then a brass one. Then a steel one. Then a stainless one.
Then make a simple one-piece wood die, and spin a part from that.

And so on.


It's fun to do brass lamps / or lanterns.
Attachment 55553
Attachment 55554
With the proper tools and a lot of passion to learn, sky is the limit, I just watched a few videos on the subject of metal spinning and I fell in love.

I'm sure it's an art with a huge learning curve but the operators of these lathes make it all look so easy.

I don't have the right tools although I do have a mini metal lathe, maybe I could start with that, or most likely I'm out to lunch thinking that way.

The light fixtures I've been making have mostly been rectangular , making the round pieces by hand takes a ton of hammering, reshaping, heating, hammering again as you can imagine, I think a spinning lathe is definitely in my future,
Thank you for the inspiration.
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  #22  
Old 03-16-2020, 02:16 AM
leoitch leoitch is offline
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hi Ken.
i sense you are leaning towards spinning to shape your objects. pls bear in mind spinning only works for "round" shapes. of course you can spin a basic round shape first and then hammer it into other shapes later.

but keep in mind you have to make a mold, either in wood or other materials, first before you can start spinning...so not sure if its worth the trouble for one-offs or very limited runs.

as many here has mentioned, shaping by hand with hammers and stakes is the simplest way to get started. only problem is the sharp learning curve when starting. but the time spent learning will be well rewarded when you realize you can shape fantastically complicated shapes with VERY few and basic stakes and hand hammers.

i personally have learnt spinning (very crudely) because of the ease to make quantity runs but my first pleasure is to shape metal by hand with hammers and stakes.

but to focus in on your question, have you considered "constructing" your rectangular shape rather than "raising" it? you can easily solder a rectangular shape together, using a bevelled solder joint to hide the seam? a well made bevelled solder joint would be close to invisible.

hope my 2 cents was worth your time.
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Last edited by leoitch; 03-16-2020 at 02:26 AM. Reason: clarification
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  #23  
Old 03-16-2020, 06:53 AM
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123pugsy 123pugsy is offline
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Originally Posted by Chris_Hamilton View Post
"Shrinking" hammer and "shrinking" dolly are for no one. Completely useless. It doesn't shrink anything but the cash in your wallet that it cost you. If you have one best thing you can do is grind the waffles off and use it as a regular body hammer.

I smoothed out my hammer and dolly.
These actually create a larger surface area, thus stretching the metal.
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  #24  
Old 03-16-2020, 07:20 AM
Richard Lennard Richard Lennard is offline
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I think the theory is that at point of impact on the tuck, hammer and dolly momentarily grip metal as tuck closes.
IMHO just make a mess of surface and nothing else happens.
Bought a pair by Snap on, cost me a fortune.
For years, thought it was me being rubbish, which I probably am, but I now know, years later post Internet, they dont work and I removed all lumps and bumps.
I thought "Snap On" - must be good!!
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  #25  
Old 03-16-2020, 09:34 AM
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http://www.jamesriser.com/CD_Preview/Intro.html
An excellent place to start
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  #26  
Old 03-16-2020, 09:52 AM
ken from Peterborough ken from Peterborough is offline
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Originally Posted by Secant View Post
Great link , already bookmarked, thank you .


Richard, Pugsy, thanks for your comments I never own a shrinking hammer/dolly and to be honest don't see myself ever trying to learn to use them on thin copper, I suppose they might be useful for occasional panel shaping/autobody work but it's good to know they should not be considered for the type of work I'm doing anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by leoitch View Post
hi Ken.
i sense you are leaning towards spinning to shape your objects. pls bear in mind spinning only works for "round" shapes. of course you can spin a basic round shape first and then hammer it into other shapes later.

but keep in mind you have to make a mold, either in wood or other materials, first before you can start spinning...so not sure if its worth the trouble for one-offs or very limited runs.

as many here has mentioned, shaping by hand with hammers and stakes is the simplest way to get started. only problem is the sharp learning curve when starting. but the time spent learning will be well rewarded when you realize you can shape fantastically complicated shapes with VERY few and basic stakes and hand hammers.

i personally have learnt spinning (very crudely) because of the ease to make quantity runs but my first pleasure is to shape metal by hand with hammers and stakes.

but to focus in on your question, have you considered "constructing" your rectangular shape rather than "raising" it? you can easily solder a rectangular shape together, using a bevelled solder joint to hide the seam? a well made bevelled solder joint would be close to invisible.

hope my 2 cents was worth your time.
Hi Lee, thank you for sharing your thoughts, this goes for every one of you.

Soldering shapes together is how it all started for me , the problem with soldering formed pieces together is, they can easily fall apart , it works fine if the project is soldered to completion but any further re-soldering new pieces (when reheating is involved) can and will loosen the old joints . my solution has been to use copper rivets where I can or a combination of soldering /riveting joints. this approach has worked much better so far.

Metal spinning seem to be my next step , I'm excited to explore this process (and learn) , the things I always imagined beyond my skills and my limits are now more possible.
Please don't stop sharing your thoughts, I hope to see more comments ,it seems like I can't get enough .
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Last edited by ken from Peterborough; 03-16-2020 at 09:55 AM.
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  #27  
Old 03-18-2020, 05:51 AM
leoitch leoitch is offline
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Ken,
sorry for not being specific...but i was thinking of brazing. and you can get silver solder for brazing at different temperatures. i know of at least 4 different grades - hard, medium, easy and extra easy.

try this for example:
https://www.riogrande.com/product/si...20-ga/101100gp
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  #28  
Old 03-18-2020, 06:39 PM
ken from Peterborough ken from Peterborough is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leoitch View Post
Ken,
sorry for not being specific...but i was thinking of brazing. and you can get silver solder for brazing at different temperatures. i know of at least 4 different grades - hard, medium, easy and extra easy.

try this for example:
https://www.riogrande.com/product/si...20-ga/101100gp
I see what you mean now Leo, Yeah brazing is stronger than just soldering, I have been using copper phosphor rods and Sil-flo rods with O/A torch and got good result if the copper is heavy gauge like around the same thickness as copper pipe, any thinner I'm not proficient enough to braze copper without burning some of it.
Have tried Silver solder (Very easy wire) and went smoothly with MAPP and O/A torch .
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  #29  
Old 03-20-2020, 02:33 PM
Brzeczyszczykiewicz Brzeczyszczykiewicz is offline
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I bought a used rotary machine with tools and several templates. I studied on Saturdays. Over time, something started to come out. Recently, I made an air filter housing for GAZ-67. However, I had to commission the biggest element.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/4264kgJ5t6qxd8VN8
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  #30  
Old 03-22-2020, 08:56 AM
ken from Peterborough ken from Peterborough is offline
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The air filter housing looks awesome, great work, thanks for posting it.
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