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  #11  
Old 06-28-2011, 02:49 PM
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Jim Stabe Jim Stabe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jere View Post
Ray:

The material would be 3003 and welded with 1100.

As for material thickness. Things to consider are, finished car weight - figure the weight of 3 sheets of 18ga and then figure 3 sheets of 16ga.

Next would be how much shape is in the panels - more shape = more strength.

Then how many people are going to be leaning on the front fender while looking under the hood at the power plant? Most people don't know not to lean on or sit on a car.
The difference in weight between a sheet of 18ga vs 16ga is 5 lbs so for 3 sheets you are only talking about 15 lbs. He is using a '74 Vette as a base so 15 lbs of bodywork is really an insignificant percentage of the total vehicle weight. Go for the added strength of the 16ga.

I have loved the Scarab body style ever since I watched Reventlow race them at Riverside
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Under construction - MGB roadster widened 11.5", Corvette C-4 suspension, 440 hp LT1 V8, T-56 6 speed.
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Part 1
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Part 2
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Last edited by Jim Stabe; 06-28-2011 at 02:52 PM.
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  #12  
Old 06-28-2011, 04:08 PM
David Gardiner David Gardiner is offline
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I would use 16g 1100 Well I use 1050A which is the same as your 1100 I believe. This is what is used on cars like Aston Martin so good enough for anything. Weld with O/A, you don't need anything special I have used lots of torches and I have had no problem welding with any of them. Use a strip of the parent material as a filler rod (why would you use anything else?) You want to be able to dress the weld out so if the weld is made of the same material as the rest of the panel there will be no probelms.

Its not possible as far as I know to weld with propane.

I really recoment that you learn to gas weld ally its not too hard, it just takes practice.

David
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  #13  
Old 06-28-2011, 04:20 PM
bobadame bobadame is offline
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David, I've used propane in place of acetylene to weld platinum. It welds cleaner and doesn't cause the platinum to harden as it does with acetylene. An acetylene regulator will also fit a propane bottle. Never tried to weld aluminum with it but it is certainly hot enough to do it. I'm talking propane/oxygen torch welding.

Looking at some heat charts on these internets it looks like the flame temperature for oxy/propane is about 1000 degrees F cooler than oxy/acet. It's about 4500 degrees. I believe aluminum melts at around 1100 F.

Last edited by bobadame; 06-28-2011 at 06:03 PM.
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  #14  
Old 06-28-2011, 05:31 PM
Overkill Overkill is offline
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Default Welding with propane

I posted this before, but here's what you find at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxy-fue...ng_and_cutting

"Oxy/Propane does not weld steel because it does not create a carbon dioxide shield around itself."

However, on aluminum it's a different matter, see:

http://www.tinmantech.com/html/alumi...ng_article.php

If you look at his site, he offers special tips for propane welding.
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  #15  
Old 06-28-2011, 06:40 PM
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There is a whole lot more to an oxy/acetylene flame than just how hot it gets.
As Overkill says the oxy/acet flame creates a shield arount the weld puddle much like the argon shield when tig or mig welding.
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Old 06-28-2011, 06:49 PM
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Thanks for your guy's input. researching it to death now..........Ray
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Old 06-29-2011, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobadame View Post
David, I've used propane in place of acetylene to weld platinum. It welds cleaner and doesn't cause the platinum to harden as it does with acetylene. An acetylene regulator will also fit a propane bottle. Never tried to weld aluminum with it but it is certainly hot enough to do it. I'm talking propane/oxygen torch welding.

Looking at some heat charts on these internets it looks like the flame temperature for oxy/propane is about 1000 degrees F cooler than oxy/acet. It's about 4500 degrees. I believe aluminum melts at around 1100 F.

Bob,

One thing to keep in mind, although the regulator for acetylene will fit the propane bottle you really need a propane or multi-fuel rated regulator and hoses since the rubber in the hoses and the regulator diaphram can degrade and leak when used with the wrong gas.

As far as heat goes, I use an oxy/propane torch for glass work and it gets hot enough to melt borosilicate (pyrex) glass and quartz at 2500-3200' F, so there is plenty of heat available. Like John said though, there is less carbon dioxide formed in the burning process, but I don't know if it will be sufficient for shielding, even with the flux on aluminum...but that is something to investigate.

Cheers,
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  #18  
Old 06-29-2011, 03:28 PM
kjc kjc is online now
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Dan,

While you're probably right I just thought I'd mention that the Victor SR4XX and VTS4XX regulators use stainless steel diaphragms and therefore won't care. Not true of the cheaper small regs of course many of which use viton or the like.
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  #19  
Old 07-01-2011, 03:50 PM
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Default Nice project

Ray,
Here's the thread link on my C5 Corvette based '60s era sports car project: http://allmetalshaping.com/showthread.php?t=2264

While I elected to build the body with a material other than aluminum, I agree with the popular opinion in this thread that you should build yours in aluminum. I didn't have knowledge or experience with shaping metal when I started my project. Now that I do, and I would make a different choice if done today.

I too am taller than average (6'5"). I've learned the importance of having longer foot wells and larger doors to make it easier for me to get in and out of sports cars. I'd suggest you spend some time mocking up door openings while you're making a buck so you can "practice" getting in and out and make sure it's comfortable.

If by chance you're open to a body other than Scarab, like maybe a Ferrari 250GTO, let me know. I might be able to help you out with measurements, etc.

Best of luck with the project!!
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  #20  
Old 07-01-2011, 05:11 PM
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Joel, Thanks for the input. I have built a Velarosa 240z based, daytona coupe 240z based and daytona coupe tube framed 351 w powered car all glass . Us tall guy's should not build sports cars..............but here we are again. I fit ok in the C3 vette tub. But the long doors and windshield will be a challange from a styling point but i have to get in and out .
I could look at my Daytona Coupe all day but driving it was a nightmare, Noisy,hot and could not fit at all. .
Taking others advice i bought a 1/24 scale model of a 70 vette and cut it up and have started re-shaping it with mud. Hope to see what it turns out like.
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