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  #41  
Old 10-12-2014, 06:30 PM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Back in sequence again.

This is the pedestal that the caged nut sits on from inside the donor frame. It will be welded inside the new mount so the original arrangement is used.


Welded the mount into place.


I also curved the top piece so it looked more factory and also gave me a bit more clearance above the caged nut so the bolt had plenty of threads showing through it.


This gives you a better idea of how it is braced across the bottom of the frame rail for support.


With the bracing done underneath the frame instead of up the side of it, I have left room in case I make my headers come over the mount.


That completes the mounting of the cradle. Might not look like it but that now means I have the mounts for the front swaybar, steering rack, front differential, engine mounts, upper and lower wishbones and the upper and lower coil/strut mounts finished. Time to move onto the rear.
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  #42  
Old 10-12-2014, 06:31 PM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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A big piece from the donor going in now.
One Chrysler rear axle with a 8.3" ring gear, electronic limited slip diff with a 3.73:1 ratio. 12.6" discs with ABS.


Centred the axle under the coil mounts by placing a level vertically each side of the axle housing and measuring back to the centre of the coil hat. Can only do this if you were careful with the placement of those in the first place of coarse.


The panhard rod bolted right in and placed the axle within a millimetre of dead centre, which surprised me actually. My XJ Jeep was about 10 mm out while still stock from new.


Now for the lower control arm mounts. After carefully removing the stock one a while ago, was not able to use it. This frame starts kicking up much earlier at a shallower angle than the donor, so misses by a lot.


With the axle sitting at the exact height in relationship to the other suspension points already mounted to the frame, I could set the arm angles up the same as factory. This will give me the correct roll centre, anti dive etc as the Jeep engineers worked out in relation to the front end arrangement.


When I laid out the frame rail spacing, I also took into account that the inner frame rail would line up with the inside of the lower control arm bush. I will just have to step out the outside of the mount to line up.


Just did a rough layout using taped pieces of recycled A4 paper. I left a 10mm-3/8" extra around the control arm end. I'd rather that if it ever hits something, that the bracket takes the weight rather than the arm and bush.


The outside angles of the bracket is set at 22.5*. Very common angle used in engineering and even my house roof is at this pitch. It also worked out that it would cover the upper control arm mount as well. The extra V taken out of the top is for a few reasons. One is that it then makes the weld length on the top and bottom of the rail the same. The top would have been 50% longer otherwise if fully welded and that would have caused the frame to bend upwards after welding. It also allows welds in the middle of the bracket increasing its strength. Lastly it reduces the weight of the bracket both physically and visually. Can also see the fold I will be putting in to accept the extra width the bush has over the frame width.


Time to start cutting out the new brackets from some of the left over 4mm plate I bought for boxing the rails. There is a inner and outer template due to needing extra length for the fold that goes into the outer one. The curved bit at the bottom of the V was first cut out using a hole saw. Then the rest just using a 9" cutoff wheel.


Now the lower arms do not run exactly parallel with the frame and skew outwards by 3*. This is common and helps reduce binding during axle articulation. The way they set the original mounts up was to press the 3* around the mounting hole.


I decided to do simulate the factory way by cutting out a 2" disc using a hole saw around the mounting point, tacking it in top and bottom, then tilting it to 3*.


Then fully welding it back in again. It is not much of a tilt, but means the bush wont be under constant tension if it had not been done and will therefore last a lot longer.
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  #43  
Old 10-12-2014, 06:36 PM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Fold has been put in the outside plate. Did the first one cold with just a hammer in the vice, but found it easier to preheat it with a propane torch to do the others.


This is how the original upper control arm mounted. The donor frame kicked inwards a bit at this point and the sides of the frame were not vertical. That is why the gap on the inside of the bracket.


The control arm actually sits on the end of the tube that passed right through the frame to the outside. I want to do the same thing but will use the lower control arm brackets as my frame kicks up too high.


I have cut away the tubing from the bracket as don't need the peice of sheet metal it was attached too. My control arm bracket is twice the thickness of the frame rail that it was originally spot welded too and will weld it directly to it. I left the extra to see if I can bend it out to fill the gap between the bracket and the frame rail.


The fold now has been straightened out just using the two hammers shown and the anvil. Just requires some dressing yet.


The UCA's, (Upper Control Arms) angle inwards at 10 degrees. I made sure the bracket matched the angle and was level the other way.


Here are the upper and lower control arm brackets mocked are into place to check that all lines up before the welding is done. It is crucial that the pinion angle is properly set also. This one is at 6* as it was from the factory and it matches exactly the output flange of the transfercase. Cars are usually around 3* with their drive-line angle with there gear box and pinion angle matching to prevent vibes.


Main plates welded in.
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  #44  
Old 10-13-2014, 12:09 PM
VetteMemphis VetteMemphis is offline
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Brilliant.

I'm learning a ton of stuff, up in heah.
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  #45  
Old 10-13-2014, 05:44 PM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VetteMemphis View Post
Brilliant.

I'm learning a ton of stuff, up in heah.
That is great to hear.
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  #46  
Old 10-13-2014, 06:11 PM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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I was not happy with the original design of the end of the tube being smaller than the side of the bush that rests against it. So I cut a disc out of some 4mm plate to weld onto the end of it the same size as the side of the bush.


To further strengthen the mounting plates I welded in a filler piece to box the ends of it which will also keep the sides nice and straight.


Plated the front face even though fairly small.


The original modified support bracket was also welded in to support the other side of the upper mount.
You also have to forgive the appearance of my welds on these upper and lower mounts as the mig kept cutting out multiple times on me while in the middle of a weld. Some times would not start at all. Stripped down the gun and found a loose wire that needed to be re-crimped.


With the arms all now fully in place, I fitted the bump stops so I could check the clearance of the upper arm bracket to make sure it wouldn't hit the cross member. There was still 1.5" of clearance at full travel so that allows enough for the bump stop compression in a hard hit.


Decided to weld in the rear most cross member. First ground a deep V so I would get full penetration


Then laid down the welds. The outside one doesn't require any further preparation.


To clean up any spatter after welding. I first just run over it with a wire brush. Then use this old blunt file that I sharpened the end of to knock any splatter off. Any that doesn't come off easily with this I will then use a hammer and cold chisel.



Now that I know that I have enough clearance under the cross member, could finally weld it in fully. Was nice to have the mig running better after the repair now too.


Also had left the coil support until this time so I could balance the welding by swapping sides between this and the cross member.


Something that has always bothered me was the angle of the lower coil mount on the rear axle. Here is a photo I took of it before strip down. Remember the rear was not effected at all when the Harley rider hit the front door and wheel, so was this way from the factory.


I found the coil bucket was sitting at 6* at ride height. The other side was at 5*! Was too much to leave as is and have no idea why the factory did it this way. Even at full compression it still was not level.


So I ground off the welds and and reset it at the best angle between ride height and full compression.


Threw the rear shocks in too. Can now see why the upper mount was made at a 8* angle.


Steering rack bolted into the stock location.


Wanted to fit the front diff too, but two of the bushes had a tear in them from the accident. Fortunately had already got the replacement bushes last year for it. Just rattled the old one out using a air chisel pushing against the outer steel sleeve. Taking care not to score the housing.


Left the new bush in overnight in the freezer to make fitting it easier. Just make sure the bush is orientated the right way as they allow more movement in one direction than the other. The slot in the centre sleeve needs to be at the top or bottom as you can see in the first shot.



Front diff is now mounted into place. Can also see how much I have moved the engine mounts back as originally the left one in the picture was over the top of the diff mount.
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www.go.jeep-xj.info

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The more brains you use, the less materials you need.
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  #47  
Old 10-14-2014, 08:48 AM
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Steve Hamilton Steve Hamilton is offline
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Hi Marcus

You are really doing a wonderful build!

Thanks for taking the time to share with the members, I know it is very time consuming, but really appreciated.

Does the axle housing need to be straightened after rebuilding the mounts after changing their angle?

Steve
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Last edited by route56wingnut; 10-14-2014 at 08:55 AM.
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  #48  
Old 10-14-2014, 06:45 PM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Hamilton View Post
Hi Marcus

You are really doing a wonderful build!

Thanks for taking the time to share with the members, I know it is very time consuming, but really appreciated.

Does the axle housing need to be straightened after rebuilding the mounts after changing their angle?

Steve
Thank you Steve for your encouragement.

The axle didn't need any straightening as each weld was only very short and spread around. Made sure they were cooled straight away and cold before starting the next one opposite it to keep it even.
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Invention is a combination of brains and materials.
The more brains you use, the less materials you need.
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  #49  
Old 10-14-2014, 06:46 PM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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This was an exciting time for me. Wheeled the engine/transmission/transfercase assembly across ready to be lifted in!


Overall shot of the frame and drive train in place.






Got a bit carried away with the engine in shots.


One of the reasons I added the front diff assembly and the steering rack was to make sure I had enough clearances. Had been a while since making the engine mounts so good to double check everything under the installed weight. Everything checked out well except for the clearance between the diff mount and the engine mount. I had made it with 3/8"-10mm of clearance, but the engine mount compressed 1/4"-6mm once under weight.


It probably would have been alright as the engine torque would lift the engine up on this side giving more room. But I couldn't be 100% sure so simply welded up the bracket holes and re-drilled them 1/4"-6mm higher. Now I am confident it will be fine.


Funny how the two cross members look remarkably similar even though there is 60 years between them. You are looking though at the top of the original and the bottom of the new one though.


Was thinking of using the old one at first but worried it might not be up to holding the weight of the new drive train.


The frame depth in this section is 2" deeper than on the donor Jeep. So I had to shorten the cross member so it would fit between the rails.


Good thing is that there is an 1" of clearance under the auto's sump compared to the bottom of the frame rail. Even the transfercase sits higher than the bottom of the frame.


It worked out the end of the cross member sits flush with the bottom of the rail once the stock drive line angle was set. Will have to make some now mounts for it next.
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  #50  
Old 10-14-2014, 08:55 PM
Oldnek Oldnek is offline
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Marcus, great job mate, your flying through this build, is there no rest for the wicked............
I have plenty in between jobs
Cheers John
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