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  #741  
Old 06-10-2017, 10:47 AM
cliffrod cliffrod is offline
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Man, Marcus- that's really fantastic. I really appreciate your investment in sharing to guide the rest of us, even though the likelihood of actually doing a project that involved from start to finish is questionable....

As far as your hand nailer experiment, I wondered about doing the same when I saw one for sale at the store recently. Some here like the comparable pneumatic Palm hammers with the larger striking face. Both are somewhat similar to my normal pneumatic hammers I use in stone work.

When we dress the butts of those machine chisels for stone work, we spin them to square the end and then put a very low crown on the end. Either a square/flat end or a more tapered end like you showed seem to mushroom much faster than a crowned end. Some believe it makes tools hit harder in general and makes certain tools spin faster.

I would use more appropriate material for the tool butt and shank as well as the striking face, even if the hammer face is attached by brazing/welding or taper.
Obviously soft material will mushroom faster than properly heat treated material, but try a low crown end instead on future tooling. It may help.

A figure eight- an "8" or rectangular piece of inner tube or similar material with hole in each end- one for tool shank and one for connection to hammer- will keep your tool held in place to free up a hand when you lift. I don't use them but some like them.

using a pair of valves in line, especially different styles, can help fine tune your air flow of your hammer is sensitive enough to benefit.

We figure it takes a minimum of 3 months of full time operation to break in a pneumatic hammer. The feel and performance can change dramatically. No reason to start the whole air motor/rivet gun vs pneumatic whatever hammer debate again. The point is having some blow by soften the hits, which has as many benefits in certain applications as a harsh sharp hit has in other situations.

Not much to offer in comparison to this whole thread, but just a little something to say thank for all you've done.
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  #742  
Old 06-10-2017, 11:32 AM
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123pugsy 123pugsy is offline
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That is just a superb job of it.
Thanks Marcus.
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  #743  
Old 06-10-2017, 07:14 PM
Charlie Myres Charlie Myres is offline
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Fantastic work Marcus; well done!
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  #744  
Old 06-10-2017, 08:28 PM
Mike Motage Mike Motage is offline
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The proportions look fantastic! Wonderful job!
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  #745  
Old 06-11-2017, 03:56 AM
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you have come such a long way since making that bowl/hubcab and 2015 melb metal WEEKEND .. look forward to catching up again soon
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  #746  
Old 06-11-2017, 05:15 AM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Thanks for the great responses. Glad you have all stuck by the build all this time and given the feedback that you all have to help this build along. I have learnt much from others here and glad I can give a little back as well.
Thanks to Kiwi John and you Dave for suggesting I post the build on here too after that first metal meet. Had no idea it would gain so many views. The most of any of the forums it is posted on even though I started the thread here a few years later than the others.

Here is a video I took this week as well.


and the playlist on the build
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...13IPnXM81a8D45
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  #747  
Old 06-11-2017, 05:18 AM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffrod View Post
Man, Marcus- that's really fantastic. I really appreciate your investment in sharing to guide the rest of us, even though the likelihood of actually doing a project that involved from start to finish is questionable....

As far as your hand nailer experiment, I wondered about doing the same when I saw one for sale at the store recently. Some here like the comparable pneumatic Palm hammers with the larger striking face. Both are somewhat similar to my normal pneumatic hammers I use in stone work.

When we dress the butts of those machine chisels for stone work, we spin them to square the end and then put a very low crown on the end. Either a square/flat end or a more tapered end like you showed seem to mushroom much faster than a crowned end. Some believe it makes tools hit harder in general and makes certain tools spin faster.

I would use more appropriate material for the tool butt and shank as well as the striking face, even if the hammer face is attached by brazing/welding or taper.
Obviously soft material will mushroom faster than properly heat treated material, but try a low crown end instead on future tooling. It may help.

A figure eight- an "8" or rectangular piece of inner tube or similar material with hole in each end- one for tool shank and one for connection to hammer- will keep your tool held in place to free up a hand when you lift. I don't use them but some like them.

using a pair of valves in line, especially different styles, can help fine tune your air flow of your hammer is sensitive enough to benefit.

We figure it takes a minimum of 3 months of full time operation to break in a pneumatic hammer. The feel and performance can change dramatically. No reason to start the whole air motor/rivet gun vs pneumatic whatever hammer debate again. The point is having some blow by soften the hits, which has as many benefits in certain applications as a harsh sharp hit has in other situations.

Not much to offer in comparison to this whole thread, but just a little something to say thank for all you've done.
I will keep those hints on the hammer in mind for when I use it next time. Thinking using head bolts, grade 8, for the shaft will help over the stainless as well.
Thanks for the input.
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  #748  
Old 07-01-2017, 08:06 AM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Not much to show as been busy going through all the saved panels from the donors to sell what I can and scrap the rest to get some much needed room and money.

This is what was left that was not worth selling of the leftover chassis and body parts from the three donors now that the cab is finished. 360kg/800lbs to the scrap metal place. Got a whole $36!


Can see why I threw this door out as was the one that took the brunt of the Harley Davidson at 100 mph!


Still managed to save the latch, electric window and wiring from it to sell


Setting the final gaps on the door now that everything is welded in. Top is leaning out a bit but flush everywhere else.


Other side is leaning out only at the top as well.


Tried forcing the top of the door inwards but would then kick out the diagonally opposite corner out and alter the gaps already set. So just cut part of the way in with a thin disc and could pull over by hand and reweld.


Both sides are nice a flush now all the way around.


I wanted to close this gap up more across the top when I chopped the window frames, but couldn't as would loose the correct gap in the inside of the frame. All the ones I have looked at are like this from the factory.


Had no welding rod to weld to the top but by the time you weld both sides of that you might as well tack along the top in one go like this.


I flush grind/sand the sides and then fit the door back up leaving the top untouched at this stage. Ran a marker along the top and then scribed a line under some 1/8" flat to set the cut line.


Gaps the same now all the way around. Back corner look tight in this shot but not when measured.


This door the front edge closed up when it was made flush. This was fixed simply by placing a block of timber on the front edge with the door open and hitting it with a mallet. That corrected the gap at the back of the door again as well to what it was before. Some filing and re welding was also needed.


This door now done too. Shadow makes the top gap look bigger though.
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Last edited by Gojeep; 07-01-2017 at 08:09 AM.
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