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  #21  
Old 11-27-2017, 06:48 PM
AllyBill AllyBill is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystallographic View Post

Gas welding does its own preheat.[/U]
TIG is sure simple and easy - when you have a gas rig around to help it make the grade.

)
That gas welding sorts its own preheat is true enough, but only because it's painfully slow - a quick blast with a butane torch is all that's needed before you arc up with the TIG and only then in extreme cases. Usually a little patience working the flame about and watching it clean the material is all that's needed. No messy flux, just lots of crackling AC bursting the oxide layer off the surface.
As for filler I've never used 4xxx rods. I use 1xxx for soft material and 5xxx for anything else unless it's exotic in which case I make my own filler from thin strips of the native material or fusion weld it so there's no argument about what's what.
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  #22  
Old 11-27-2017, 07:03 PM
lots2learn lots2learn is online now
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My first try. 3003 H14 and 1100 filler rod. I blew a hole at the end and used a #1 tip, #2 tip is ordered. I will need some more practice. Filling the hole was a little harder than TIG for me.


I plan on doing some TIG with the same filler and then test the panel for crack resistance and ease of shaping.

20171127_164043-resized-800.jpg

inside
20171127_164055-resized-800.jpg
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Last edited by lots2learn; 11-27-2017 at 07:07 PM.
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  #23  
Old 11-28-2017, 07:31 PM
AllyBill AllyBill is offline
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With shapes like the one you just welded, using TIG I would pre-heat, blow in a nice hot tack every inch or so, let it all cool then knock the tops off with a die-grinder then wheel the panel to near enough its final shape. Some of the tacks will crack as you go but they can be either fused back together or glued with a dod of filler. Once you have the shape nailed you can weld between the tacks, but be patient and let some heat out each time so as not to capture too much heat distortion in the finished job.

Will
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  #24  
Old 11-29-2017, 12:53 AM
Maxakarudy Maxakarudy is offline
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The chatter about gas & tig will never be settled, both have there benefits & negatives, learn both is my advice.

I recently came across these short vids by a guy at Wrays shop.....

https://youtu.be/KXESENv37Eg
https://youtu.be/-MMrnRNRXbU
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  #25  
Old 11-29-2017, 07:45 AM
Mike Motage Mike Motage is offline
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Greg, try using less flux and smaller filler wire. Do some practice coupons before welding on piece that you have a lot of time on. I'm assuming that you are still trying to master gas welding aluminum. Once you have the puddle established, gas welding aluminum is very fast paced.

AllyBill, I started this thread to show that an old man with fairly inexpensive equipment can learn to gas weld aluminum proficiently with nothing more than tutoring and determination. I'm in agreement with you, Kent and Martin, tig can be used successfully as well, with a learning curve and associated equipment costs. Please don't poo on my newest skill in gas welding and my or anyone's desire to do so. If you want to highlight the benefits of Tig welding start a thread, show your shaped and welded work, in process.
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Last edited by Mike Motage; 11-29-2017 at 08:57 AM.
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  #26  
Old 11-29-2017, 11:26 AM
lots2learn lots2learn is online now
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Still waiting on #2 tip and I will try again. The thinnest wire I have is 1/16. Do you flux the wire also?

This was just a practice panel. My plan is to weld half the seam with TIG and then flux and weld the other half with gas. Then grind down the welds and do some more shaping & planishing on the panel and see wish one cracks first. Not going to using any back gas on the TIG as I don't see that as practical on body shapes.


I can see this oxy aluminum welding being handy as a portable solution also. I have a victor portable oxy set. Its about 600 pounds lighter than my synchrowave.
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  #27  
Old 11-29-2017, 12:18 PM
Mike Motage Mike Motage is offline
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Greg, I've been using.035 1100 aluminum mig wire and flux only the very edge of the metal and filler. Of course I scuff the pieces and wire. With that thin wire, it melts as soon as it touches the puddle. There's no waiting just touch, move touch and move. Less flux is definitely better in my eyes.
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  #28  
Old 11-29-2017, 01:15 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Motage View Post
Greg, I've been using.035 1100 aluminum mig wire and flux only the very edge of the metal and filler. Of course I scuff the pieces and wire. With that thin wire, it melts as soon as it touches the puddle. There's no waiting just touch, move touch and move. Less flux is definitely better in my eyes.
Mike, Greg,

On the .050 material I tend to use a #2 Meco tip and the .035 wire.
I've used 3/64 wire, also.
And I found some .025 straight filler, also, in a high-end metal shop - but I do not know where that was sourced ...

When I make fuel tanks, I only flux the wire, though I make sure everything is clean - isopropyl washed and ss brushed to white. I will use some maroon scuff pad with Isop on it for sanitizing the filler, as the factory draw wax is ubiquitous.

"Less flux into the weld is less flux to clean up" - and I like my tank builds to go smoothly and quickly.

(My welding times are brisk, once things are clean, lined up, tacked and ready. I tack with a hot flame, and then start welding with the flame hot, and as the heat builds in the part I dial the torch back.)

Tip: when using straight filler rods, set up a 2x4 wood block with a series of rowed 1/8" holes to stand up 8-10+ of the cleaned-fluxed rods in. Keep at your elbow on your rod-handling side ....

Elegant time saver: Start welding and as you run the rod down to 4-5" left, freeze it in the puddle - grab a fresh one and then weld the end of the fresh rod onto the stuck stump, and keep on agoing.
4-6 seconds E.T. on the rod change saves significant cool down time. !! (if you want to see footage, I can post the F'Book clip....)

Cobra kustom trunk floor tank.jpg
Kustom tank for an old A.C. Bristol / Ford ...

Glad to help you guys where I can ...
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Last edited by crystallographic; 11-29-2017 at 02:50 PM.
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  #29  
Old 11-29-2017, 01:23 PM
toreadorxlt toreadorxlt is offline
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I have the hardest time welding alloy with gas. 3003 and 1100 rod. both .050 and .60 post the same problems to me.

I have a #0, #1, and #2 tip with a Meco. I have tried all with minimal change. I set my regulators at 4-5psi each, and set the flame to neutral.

It typically takes a good amount of time to start a puddle, but once I start gas welding, its a full on sprint. No matter how much filler I add, i can never get a weld to stand proud, its always flush (I know its desirable to have a flush weld, but I am running on the extreme hot side, and cant get it to slow down). It seems like its always on the cusp of blowing a monster hole, and most times it does. I've tried the torch quietly whispering, hissing loudly, making no noise... etc...

I have seen videos of Kent and others and it seems like they have way more "play time" than I do. I imagine a few variable could be at cause here, but does anybody have the same issues?


I admittedly am not using Kent glasses, but rather a blue filter behind a #5 shade. My regulators are single stage, Dont know how much of a difference this makes. My lack of success makes me not want to invest more time and energy in gas welding when I can TIG with no issues. Seeing beautiful work like you've posted makes me want to go back and try again. Its a viscous cycle.
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  #30  
Old 11-29-2017, 01:28 PM
lots2learn lots2learn is online now
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Appreciate the input. I will get some .035 wire and do some more practice. I went a little crazy with the flux. Will dial that back.
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