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Old 04-15-2018, 07:21 PM
kjohnfj40 kjohnfj40 is offline
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Default Radiator Shroud

I am new to metal shaping but looking to learn, just hope an old dog can learn new tricks.

A radiator shroud is my project. The shroud will have on 90-degree bend on the top and bottom and the sides will have a double 90 to create a mounting flange. Guessing the 90 bends would be made last. In the center is 15-inch circular hole for the fan blades. Around the 15-inch hole I need a 2-inch wide flange at 90 degrees.

Started with a smaller sample but after receiving my shrinker/stretcher my sample was to small to use the s/s so I cut in two so I could practice. Started rolling and stretching. At about 75 degrees the flange that I was stretching started cracking. Not sure if my technique and or material are wrong. Have been reading about material for drawing on this site. The sheet I a have is cold roll.

This could be made in aluminum or steel, am leaning towards steel.

My only knowledge of metal shaping has come from watching videos online. David Gs video has been mentioned many times on this site so I have ordered his video.

To sum things up I need an intervention by those in the know.

Thanks Kevin
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Old 04-16-2018, 05:30 AM
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MP&C MP&C is online now
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A 2" wide flange will have a considerable amount of shrinking/stretching . We did a fan shroud recently and used less of a flange and attached the narrow flange to a flat baffle plate to the sides... Pictures/video shown in this thread..


http://www.allmetalshaping.com/showthread.php?t=17384
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Old 04-16-2018, 08:31 AM
Marc Bourget Marc Bourget is offline
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Your cooling efficiency will go way up if you put a radius on the last "turn" to the exit and "sculpt" the fan blades to match!
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Old 04-16-2018, 08:40 AM
Kevinb71 Kevinb71 is offline
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Marc
Do you happen to have a picture of what you mean? Thanks!
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Old 04-16-2018, 12:15 PM
kjohnfj40 kjohnfj40 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MP&C View Post
A 2" wide flange will have a considerable amount of shrinking/stretching . We did a fan shroud recently and used less of a flange and attached the narrow flange to a flat baffle plate to the sides... Pictures/video shown in this thread..


http://www.allmetalshaping.com/showthread.php?t=17384
Would prefer not to make it a two piece, but not opposed to it either. Did you bead roll in the flat and slip roll the large radius?
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Old 04-16-2018, 12:27 PM
kjohnfj40 kjohnfj40 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Bourget View Post
Your cooling efficiency will go way up if you put a radius on the last "turn" to the exit and "sculpt" the fan blades to match!
Marc do you have picture of the exit radius? The fan is plastic so no sculpting.
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Old 04-16-2018, 02:58 PM
Marc Bourget Marc Bourget is offline
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The better designs in OEM applications will show what I'm referencing.

The "box" behind the core can be square, the second corner to the back of the box can also be 90 degs. It's when you go to exit the box.

What you show is a cylinder. the corner from the back of the box should be 1-1/2" or greater radius. The fan, from the side has a depth because of the pitch of the blades. Good placement of the fan is 1/2 the depth of the pitch into the opening or shroud exit. The idea is to trim the fan, originally somewhat larger than the opening, to match the curvature of the exit.

The tighter you can keep the clearance between fan tips and shroud, the better the efficiency of air movement. Tough for an engine driven fan mounted to the block/water pump. Easy for a remotely mounted fan.

I have a ring binder and power-point for my Cooling lectures but I can't locate them right now. I've attached a quick sketch.

I should've said "trim" rather than "sculpting" :^)
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Fan-Shroud Dwg.pdf (9.4 KB, 49 views)
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Old 04-16-2018, 07:31 PM
kjohnfj40 kjohnfj40 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Bourget View Post
The better designs in OEM applications will show what I'm referencing.

The "box" behind the core can be square, the second corner to the back of the box can also be 90 degs. It's when you go to exit the box.

What you show is a cylinder. the corner from the back of the box should be 1-1/2" or greater radius. The fan, from the side has a depth because of the pitch of the blades. Good placement of the fan is 1/2 the depth of the pitch into the opening or shroud exit. The idea is to trim the fan, originally somewhat larger than the opening, to match the curvature of the exit.

The tighter you can keep the clearance between fan tips and shroud, the better the efficiency of air movement. Tough for an engine driven fan mounted to the block/water pump. Easy for a remotely mounted fan.

I have a ring binder and power-point for my Cooling lectures but I can't locate them right now. I've attached a quick sketch.

I should've said "trim" rather than "sculpting" :^)
You have given a lot of great information there Marc, thanks
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Old 04-16-2018, 09:44 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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I don't know much about this stuff, but I made one that was polished.

It looked like this:
Willys drag car.jpg
For this car:
Willys, 3_4 front, copy.jpg

It was a blown Mopar, with solid mounts - so I could hold .250" on fan clearance. It was a record car back in the day, but now the blower just works at street levels, so the fan has to cool pretty well.
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Old 04-17-2018, 05:10 AM
kjohnfj40 kjohnfj40 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystallographic View Post
I don't know much about this stuff, but I made one that was polished.

It looked like this:
Attachment 46719
For this car:
Attachment 46718

It was a blown Mopar, with solid mounts - so I could hold .250" on fan clearance. It was a record car back in the day, but now the blower just works at street levels, so the fan has to cool pretty well.
Was that formed mostly with hand tools, being a newbie trying to visualize how you formed the corners.
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