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Old 11-27-2016, 12:30 PM
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Default One way to build a wood crate buck

I just completed the drawings for this Model A fender buck, and am posting while it is all fresh in my mind. This is not the only way, just one way. I like making drawings, so this is the approach that I have taken, and from my limited experience, I like the fact that I can use it as a hammer form buck if I need to. In some previous bucks, I was too liberal in making the buck ribs be vertical, leaving too much sanding to fit the actual contours. That also made it harder to hold up under some of the 'angled' hammer blows. I learned the West System glue usage from Jim Hery and the 3D scanning was done by Scott White at the last Redneck Roundup.

This the .IGES file that was sent to me by Scott White after he 'worked over' the point cloud from the 3D scan taken in the shop.
MA1.jpg

I saved that file as a parts file in SolidWorks.
MA2.jpg

One of the earliest steps was to establish a base and back bone that could be cut out of the available 60" x 60" Baltic birch plywood. Then a 'plane' surface was determined at the highest point of the contour and using the cut surface of the 3D scan the back bone was drawn to match that contour, and the cross web locations were cut in place.
MA3.jpg

By establishing a working plane at one side of the web slots, and using the edge of the fender as determined by the cutting plane, a cross web contour was established then extruded to the thickness of the plywood. By using the 'convert entities / intersection curve' command the dark line along the contour is established at the exact location of the fender skin.
MA4.jpg

This is the combination support and contour web from the above cross section.
MA5.jpg

Pre-assembly holes were added to the SolidWorks drawing of the base to locate the support webs and the component assembly was started.
MA6.jpg

One of the last cross ribs about to be inserted on to the back bone.
MA7.jpg

Pre- assembly of the drawing components almost completed.
MA8.jpg

Components in place. The notches at the side are for the edge ribbing. Where the edging looks to be protruding shows where the edging will be bent to the fender contour at the assembly gluing process.
MA9.jpg

Individual drawings are then made and further saved as a .dxf file for use at the water jet place. Minimal dimensions are required only to allow the water jet operator to check the scale before cutting.
MA10.jpg

For these larger projects, I assemble the components into a 60" x 60" plywood panel for cutting at the same time.
MA11.jpg

This is the drawing, in .dxf format that will be sent to the water jet guy for cutting. In both the above and below photos there are components that are for a Bugatti headlight buck project, as I could take advantage of combining projects.
MA12.jpg

Here is a picture of the completed buck without the fender in place.
MA13.jpg

This picture shows the fender superimposed on the buck. The parts that show above the fender scan are the areas that will need to be 'custom' sanded before being able to use the buck. The red outer edging component is made longer than the fender to account for the material needed to include the wire edging prior to forming the fender edge bead typical of the Model A's.
MA14.jpg
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Last edited by RockHillWill; 11-27-2016 at 01:46 PM.
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Old 11-27-2016, 12:39 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RockHillWill View Post
I just completed the drawings for this Model A fender buck, and am posting while it is all fresh in my mind. This is not the only way, just one way. I like making drawings, so this is the approach that I have taken, and from my limited experience, I like the fact that I can use it as a hammer form buck if I need to. In some previous bucks, I was too liberal in making the buck ribs be vertical, leaving too much sanding to fit the actual contours. That also made it harder to hold up under some of the 'angled' hammer blows. I learned the West System glue usage from Jim Hery and the 3D scanning was done by Scott White at the last Redneck Roundup.

This the .IGES file that was sent to me by Scott Whiten after he 'worked over' the point cloud from the 3D scan taken in the shop.
Attachment 39562

I saved that file as a parts file in SolidWorks.
Attachment 39563

One of the earliest steps was to establish a base and back bone that could be cut out of the available 60" x 60" Baltic birch plywood.
Attachment 39564

Attachment 39565

Attachment 39566

Attachment 39567

Attachment 39568

Attachment 39569

Attachment 39570

Attachment 39571

Attachment 39572

Attachment 39573
Wow, that looks great Will. You have captured the process accurately.
How did you determine the eye/hand openings, from making a fender or two?
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Old 11-27-2016, 01:00 PM
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Thanks, Kent. I do not have enough experience to decide in advance what I will need, just that I have observed that I need a number of openings to see as many place as I can to see how things fit. I also use pieces of metal pallet banding, some times bent to 'feel' in behind the panel. I'm still a little new to this, but getting 'boned up' for more work on Jim's Bugatti project.
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Last edited by RockHillWill; 11-28-2016 at 07:20 PM.
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Old 11-27-2016, 01:06 PM
bobadame bobadame is offline
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Very, very nice work Will!
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Old 11-27-2016, 01:32 PM
Joe Swamp Joe Swamp is offline
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This is really fantastic, and makes me wonder about the degree to which this process could be completely automated -- you just push a button and a fender buck 3D puzzle arrives in the mail. Seems like you're about 70% there, already the labor savings is pretty staggering.

Does the water jet cutter only cut straight down or can it make bevel cuts in the plywood?
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Old 11-27-2016, 06:50 PM
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Joe, that water gent fellows that I use only have the three axis machines, but there are others that have extended capabilities.
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Old 11-28-2016, 08:30 AM
Peter Tommasini Peter Tommasini is offline
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It will be a nice Buck Will !!
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Old 11-28-2016, 10:48 AM
Mike Motage Mike Motage is offline
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Will, you build the nicest bucks!
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Old 11-28-2016, 05:00 PM
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Nice work Will, I admire your ability of mastering SolidWorks and the way you explain in detail what the process is about. Thanks for posting.
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Old 11-29-2016, 06:24 PM
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Looks really great, Will.

I had wondered about angling station elements to better meet the actual part contours. It just makes sense. Thanks for sharing so much information.
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