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  #21  
Old 03-31-2020, 08:10 AM
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MP&C MP&C is offline
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The 14 gauge pieces were perfect still. The 16 GA (ribs) and the outer sheet metal seem to be the only casualties here.
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  #22  
Old 03-31-2020, 12:07 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Way to go, Rob't.
Differing gauges helps prevent casualties.


(as a side note re: diff. gauges - I recognized several different gauges, finishes, and qualities when restoring bulk #'s of autos for "World's Lgst" years ago .... vintage mostly 1920's to 1939 ... for instance: 20 -14 ga, black plate, CR, HR, "rimsteel" and plate of the "quality" level having visible inclusions, varying thcknesses across a Single Sq.Foot, waves and - even some adorned with 12grit mill scale. Then 20 years later, working with the pres. of the Int'l Stearns Knight klub, he -being an engineer with 4 deg- showed me a "metals Product Guide, ed 1929" having 14 different grades of steel for auto production. From my own personal experience at HAC participating in 12 full restos/yr/5yrs - ::: door locking pillars, hinge pillars, floor boards, battery trays, door frames, door skins, roof supports, fenders, dash boards, cowl sections, seat fames, and inner support brackets - each with its own production spec/grade steel. )
yeehaw,
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  #23  
Old 03-31-2020, 10:38 PM
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Thanks for the insight Kent!


Time to get the hood brace end welded in place. The overall measurement had been taken prior to cutting off the old one, down to the 14 gauge outer plate as a reference. So the new end is trimmed to match this dimension, then held in place with rare earth magnets. The center (inside) rib is aligned and tacked using the TIG....








Working outward, the panel surfaces are aligned and tacked as we go. Note the "batwings" left on the outside of the new brace end (yellow arrows). This will act as a heat sink when we make the outer tacks. Had these been trimmed to match prior to welding, the edge will have a tendency to burn back from the heat.





The entire seam is TIG welded and then our batwings are trimmed using offset snips, then welds dressed..




















One down......
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Old 04-01-2020, 04:59 AM
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Nice stuff Robert.
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  #25  
Old 04-01-2020, 06:12 AM
Jaroslav Jaroslav is offline
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Robert. Perfect as always. With us the possibility of material for boards can be purchased. I will need to make contact. For some thinner things I use POM material.

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  #26  
Old 04-02-2020, 10:49 PM
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Thanks guys!


Starting on the other end of the hood brace, this one not as rotted as the other but has issues just the same. One of those "while we're here" things....

The ribs are trimmed and ends rounded.. A piece of flat 16 gauge is trimmed to fit..














tacked together....





.then the photographer went on strike until we got to this...











We'll get this trimmed and installed tomorrow..
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  #27  
Old 04-03-2020, 07:33 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MP&C View Post
Thanks guys!


Starting on the other end of the hood brace, this one not as rotted as the other but has issues just the same. One of those "while we're here" things....

The ribs are trimmed and ends rounded.. A piece of flat 16 gauge is trimmed to fit..














tacked together....





.then the photographer went on strike until we got to this...











We'll get this trimmed and installed tomorrow..

Nice fits, Rob't.
I've seen dental work not fitting as well ...
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  #28  
Old 04-07-2020, 12:26 PM
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Thanks Kent!


More progress on the hood, here is the other end of the hood brace.





Looking at the back side, you can see where a few holes were welded closed the last time it was painted, and the severe pitting and new holes that we have. A testament to the fact that what shows is always the tip of the iceberg. Although better than the passenger side, this is definitely one of those "while we are here" things. Do it right, do it once. (grinder marks were mine)








With our new replacement all one piece, the next step is to bend the flange that spot welds to the hood skin. A tipping wheel in the Fasti-werks bead roller makes quick work of it. The bend line was transposed from the original and an initial pass under the tipping die marks the crease line a bit better, Then successive passes are made, lifting slightly with each pass. This is done until the beads interfere with the tipping die.










Then the partial bent flange is clamped in the magnetic brake for the remainder of the fold. This brake allows us to use a die on either side of the bead details, where a full die may inadvertently push in on the beads.








End gets cut to length and marked for initial trimming








Looks like we may have enough bead stock left for another couple of ends.






That's where we left off yesterday, we'll see about welding the new end on today..



.
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  #29  
Old 04-08-2020, 05:20 AM
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That support looks like it is nice and stiff without much depth. Could be handy when clearance is a problem.
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  #30  
Old 04-08-2020, 08:28 PM
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MP&C MP&C is offline
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Thanks Marcus!


Our last end for the hood brace. Off with the old.....





Then it gets trimmed to our scribe line and the end media blasted in prep for welding. Our new end is test fit and trimmed until we get the right distance to our reference marks. The "batwings" give us a heat sink at the edge for less chance of burning back the edge at the weld.





The center rib is aligned both on the sides and the face, and tacked in position using the TIG.





The pieces are aligned as we work outward, tacking as we go. A "corking tool" is used as a dolly where any bumping may be needed for alignment.








Tacked...





Welded....





Welds cleaned up and end angles compared..










Now we can get back to straightening sheet metal..
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