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  #11  
Old 11-07-2018, 05:22 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is online now
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Beautiful work as ever Kent. Can you tell me why you used TIG instead of gas, was it to keep the HAZ as small as possible?
Thanks, David.
On small complicated parts I have to be careful with heat. This panel can get heat-soaked real quick, and my choice was to either use wet rags as heat sinks or to pull out my venerable WP20....

Hindsight: wet rags and torch would have yielded a better surface finish.
- But, I have a lot of repairs to perform on this panel and some are really complicated, sooooo .... trying to lessen complexity yields still other complexities.
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Last edited by crystallographic; 11-07-2018 at 05:25 PM.
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  #12  
Old 11-11-2018, 06:04 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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Originally Posted by crystallographic View Post
As promised the other end got patched, same way -

Attachment 49530
ready for weld dressing, hammering, filing.

Panel is set up for standing hand work, "handworking at the bench."

Attachment 49526
Bright lights enhance visibility one thousand percent.
As Bob Davids would tell me, "Do this or fail!" (bright illumination, reflecting off of surface = critical lighting. He is an old Art Center graduate, so ...)
Note: stuff shown on bench, under panel =
quick check spray
machinist spray blue,
Super Shear file
rigid hard sanding block
marlinspike
spring steel spoon
asst'd weight/face contour hammers

Attachment 49527
"Spooning" with the forged spring steel spoon, to fine-level the surface with the marlin spike held under as "dolly." (both tools mfg'd by TM Tech)
Attachment 49528
"Check file" the surface, using modified Super Shear file (source:TM Tech)
Attachment 49529
filed surface - might want to compare this with my first/intro post.
I am removing .002" material (demo measured during my "metal finishing classes) to simply "check" the surface, hence "check filing," a term used by pre-1960's metal guys who knew how to file, what files were available, and how to care for files. Files are one of the two fundamental hand tools. Good idea to know how to use one.


- and so on to completion ...
Hi Kent,

Can you show more on how you modified the Super Shear file for check filing? Thanks for sharing the project, always nice to see airplane projects.

Bill
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  #13  
Old 11-11-2018, 11:20 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is online now
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Hi Kent,

Can you show more on how you modified the Super Shear file for check filing? Thanks for sharing the project, always nice to see airplane projects.

Bill

Here ya go, Bill:

P1010663.jpg

P1010664.jpg
P1010665.jpg
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  #14  
Old 11-12-2018, 12:04 PM
sblack sblack is offline
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Cessna wheel pants? I interesting location for the welds. Not like your video where each side was done in equal quarters. These appear to be divided at the points of highest curvature. Gorgeous work.

You must have to be real careful on those instrument panels to not over stretch. I still don't get what the Marlin spike is for, though I know it is one of your go-to tools. Someday I will get down there. My fear is that I will return home with half your tool inventory (already own the other half) and have to get another mortgage.

ps - supershear is my go-to file. Love it for aluminum. Perhaps I need to get another one to bend it up.
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Last edited by sblack; 11-12-2018 at 12:07 PM.
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  #15  
Old 11-13-2018, 11:19 AM
crystallographic crystallographic is online now
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Cessna wheel pants? I interesting location for the welds. Not like your video where each side was done in equal quarters. These appear to be divided at the points of highest curvature. Gorgeous work.

You must have to be real careful on those instrument panels to not over stretch. I still don't get what the Marlin spike is for, though I know it is one of your go-to tools. Someday I will get down there. My fear is that I will return home with half your tool inventory (already own the other half) and have to get another mortgage.

ps - supershear is my go-to file. Love it for aluminum. Perhaps I need to get another one to bend it up.

Yes Scott, those 195 pants had the welds on the highest-strength contours. Worth noting is that the beads go right through the planished gas welds - with zero problems.
I use our Marlin spike (phid) as several different tools: a small dolly-on-a-stick, a small hammer, a lifting point, a line-up punch, and as a radius tool. Best $1.5 I spent, back in 1972.... now we make this one size for metal working.
Super Shear file design (Nicholson) dates to 1953, according to the man who set up the machine to cut them. Great file for cutting aluminum fast.
P1010663 copy.jpg
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Last edited by crystallographic; 11-13-2018 at 11:38 AM.
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  #16  
Old 02-14-2019, 05:09 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is online now
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Default Flat panel hole repairs - 5052

P1010544 copy.jpg
Going on to the other end of the olde Luscombe panel, holes cut to add more usability (gauges) must go away.
P1010545 copy.jpg
Pattern paper has helpful translucence that enables layout of stuff underneath the paper.
P1010546 copy.jpg
The paper now determines the blank, which is cut out, deburred, and taped to the part and is then carefully scribed around.
P1010548 copy.jpg
Small compound-action offset aviation snips make the cuts, left-hand snips for one way and right-hand for the other.
P1010553 copy.jpg
Cut, filed, de-burred and the blank is starting to fit - so I start tacking with the tig. I tack where it is easiest - no fighting, yet.
P1010556 copy.jpg
At the top, by the tape, I had a small overlap so I just did a melt-back with the tig, and hammered it flat.
P1010557 copy.jpg
I keep tacking and then weld a short stretch. All is smooth.
P1010559 copy.jpg
I weld it all, in short stretches, balancing the tension by weld placement.
P1010982 copy.jpg
I mow the proud bead down to level using a 100 grit belt.
P1010983 copy.jpg
More mowing.
P1010986 copy.jpg
After I weld the back side, I sand that, too. I want even thickness and also even surfaces - first by careful sanding and then by careful hammering.

P1010981 copy.jpg
I've used this type sander for about 18 years. I've used many others. For this level of detail, I need accurate rapid metal removal. 'nuff said.


Next up: Hammering and filing.
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Last edited by crystallographic; 02-14-2019 at 05:13 PM.
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  #17  
Old 02-15-2019, 12:06 AM
fred26t fred26t is offline
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Default Filing welds

Great post Kent, as always. I assume the DVD will be available soon. Fred26T
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  #18  
Old 02-15-2019, 02:04 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is online now
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Great post Kent, as always. I assume the DVD will be available soon. Fred26T

Thanks Fred.
Yeh, edu.stuff in the works.
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  #19  
Old 02-15-2019, 03:08 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is online now
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Default Hammering welds on flat work

P1010988 copy.jpg

I start the first go-over with my "big" body hammer - a 14oz. double face deep-reach, either my Plomb or my Fairmount - this one is a re-handled Fairmount, (with the hand-dressed octagonal Plomb-style grip.)
Note- face not clean enough for this job. The other face has been swept off with 320grit, my standard for this paint-grade work.
P1010989 copy.jpg
My back-up is not steel, but rather a nice (resilient) Masonit-topped wooden workbench.
I am only "bumping" the metal flat with just the weight of the hammer.
P1010992 copy.jpg
2nd go-over is with the same hammer but over a steel bench anvil.
Flatness is visibly progressing in the image.
P1010993 copy.jpg
I keep count of the "steel on steel" hits, using only three or four in two inches. I watch the surface carefully so that my hits are evenly distributed.
(reminder: metal is 5052, .050" and welded with 5356 alloy filler.)
P1010996 copy.jpg
Note that the center of the new area is not hammered.
P1010997 copy.jpg
3rd go-over is with the delicate 4oz hammer. I turned this from a one inch Gr8 bolt during lunch, 1973. Yes, the pick has been hard-faced with Stoodite, typical for my pick hammers - not that they get much use in this century ...
P1010998 copy.jpg
When off the bench anvil I will back-up with my old-school "dolly-block" brazed from 3pcs - a horse-shoers rasp, a block of mild 3/4" flat bar, and a flat chunk of leaf spring. The file side gets very little use any more, but the spring side is a great little flat dolly that is very easy to hang onto because of the "H" geometry and the high-friction grip.


Next up: Going to the "file-finish."
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  #20  
Old 02-15-2019, 07:25 PM
Oldnek Oldnek is offline
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Nice Instructions Kent, with a touch of humour.
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