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  #11  
Old 02-21-2011, 02:10 PM
revmopar revmopar is offline
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thanks so much for this thread, this is exactly what I have been looking for, now if i could find a shop close by to go hang out for a little while.....I tend to learn better by hands on experience
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  #12  
Old 02-21-2011, 03:40 PM
Scott Hightower Scott Hightower is offline
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When it comes time to join thin sheet metal you will likely want a small mig welder. For your work you can get away with a 110volt machine running .023 wire. If it is in the budget you can upgrade to a 220 volt welder and gang install a double 110 breaker to get the power you need.

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  #13  
Old 02-21-2011, 06:06 PM
David Gardiner David Gardiner is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Hightower View Post
When it comes time to join thin sheet metal you will likely want a small mig welder. For your work you can get away with a 110volt machine running .023 wire. If it is in the budget you can upgrade to a 220 volt welder and gang install a double 110 breaker to get the power you need.

Scott
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If you are intending to make panels I would consider a little tig welder over a mig. I prefer to use gas welding for most of the welds I do. Mig welds are hard and very difficult to dress out.
Look into the various welding methods and consider very carefully before deciding, A lot depends on what use you are likely to put it to. There are several threads on here about this subject.

David
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  #14  
Old 02-21-2011, 07:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Gardiner View Post
Mig welds are hard and very difficult to dress out.

David
ESAB have a wire called "Easy grind" thats fairly soft.
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  #15  
Old 02-21-2011, 08:49 PM
ShawnMarsh ShawnMarsh is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Gardiner View Post
If you are intending to make panels I would consider a little tig welder over a mig. I prefer to use gas welding for most of the welds I do. Mig welds are hard and very difficult to dress out.
Look into the various welding methods and consider very carefully before deciding, A lot depends on what use you are likely to put it to. There are several threads on here about this subject.

David
Besides that, an Oxy Acetylene setup can be used for cutting, heating for bending thicker steel, heat shrinking, and more. Plus, I was able to buy my whole setup for $125 with half full tanks, and being able to gas weld is a perfect intro to TIG welding.

I prefer TIG because I have more experience with it, but cost is a big proficient and 110v TIGs arent worth the $ IMO. I would take a torch any day over MIG for metal shaping, but a MIG is still needed for plug welds.
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  #16  
Old 02-24-2011, 07:22 AM
moparmaddnes moparmaddnes is offline
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This is a great thread. With so many tools out there it is hard to know were to start. I have some ideas as what to get, but thanks to Joe I now have a starting point. Thanks
Matt
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  #17  
Old 03-05-2011, 05:51 PM
jduncan jduncan is offline
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This is a great starter thread. I've been doing a little stick welding as well as MIG over at a friends shop. He does some fabrication but not much in the way of curves.

But I have the shaping bug so practice has to start soon!
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  #18  
Old 03-11-2011, 06:44 PM
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Jay Ess Jay Ess is offline
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Quote:
I mean use a post dolly of appropriate size like the one below and hit the work just off the point of contact with a wedge shaped soft hammer (wood or plastic) the plastic hammer in the pic has one wedge shaped end.

Where would I purchase a plastic headed hammer like the one above?
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  #19  
Old 03-11-2011, 07:00 PM
ShawnMarsh ShawnMarsh is offline
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http://www.tuckpuck.com/ is one source, and pick up a TuckPuck while you're there. I'll be trying out the hammer pretty soon myself, just gotta wait till next week
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  #20  
Old 03-11-2011, 07:06 PM
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http://www.tuckpuck.com/ is one source, and pick up a TuckPuck while you're there. I'll be trying out the hammer pretty soon myself, just gotta wait till next week
I have the Tuck Pucks. As much as I like Carey's hammer I am partial to oval shaped wood handles.
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