All MetalShaping

Go Back   All MetalShaping > General Metal Shaping Discussion > Miscellanous products related to metalshaping
  Today's Posts Posts for Last 7 Days Posts for Last 14 Days  

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #11  
Old 10-06-2017, 09:22 PM
CaptonZap CaptonZap is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Denver CO
Posts: 86
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldnek View Post
Adding I also had a set of Makita JS1660 Shears, they were great until they fell off the bench and snapped the cutting nose off them.
Only used those upto 1.2mm so I can't comment on how they cut on thicker material.
https://www.ebay.com/sch/sis.html?_n...SHEAR+NEW+240v

You might try Makita repair shops for parts. They are pretty good about replacement parts.

CZ
__________________
Jerry Roy
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-07-2017, 10:37 AM
weldtoride weldtoride is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 862
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Murdoch View Post
...I thought a scroll saw would have done it, but not good at all...

Like several others have said above, a hand-held jigsaw can do a decent job if set up right.

A few years back I had a run of published articles, and one was a tech article in Hometown Hot Rod magazine, vol 2 issue 9. Sadly, that magazine is no longer published.

The article was titled "Plasma Substitute". In it, I made the argument that a hand-held jigsaw can be a suitable, but slower substitute for a plasma cutter.

Some salient points:

....the sheet has to be secured somehow

....you have to use considerable down pressure on the saw, as it wants to bounce. make sure the saw is not set to orbit

...my article was written for cutting steel, I used several different brands of blades designated for steel, most were wavy set, like a hand-held hacksaw blade. For cutting aluminum, I would use coarser blades, and a dry lubricant to prevent tooth clogging.

... for 18 ga steel I used a 32 tpi blade and pushed my saw along at a rate of approximately 10 inches per minute
... for 1/8" steel I cut with an 18 tpi blade at 2 inches per minute
... for 3/16 steel I cut with a 12tpi blade at 2 inches per minute

... use enough forward pressure so that you see a constant chip being created, if you don't you are dulling the blade. if you do dull a blade-toss it

... a slow blade speed setting on your saw is absolutely essential....start out on the saw's slowest speed setting, then gradually increase

... as you experiment, you will find that faster blade speed gets to a point of too fast-where the chip doesn't have time to clear, and friction destroys blades.

... check your blade temp occasionally, the correct speed will only warm the blade, if too hot, you're too fast

... this is loud, and the tiny flying chips are hot, not enough to burn you, but if they land in an eye they are a double whammy, so eye and ear protection is advised

... Although those cutting times seem slow, there is some time gain on the cleanup side of the task. A jigsaw cuts with minimum distortion, there is a slight rough edge to clean. Generally a few swipes with a file cleans it up enough.

... A hand-held plasma on the other hand has some dross to clean, and the metal immediately next to the cut has been embrittled and that causes its own issues

... While the cut edge from a Beverly shear is very clean, the piece coming off the right side of the blades is often distorted with some curl

I still don't have a plasma and buy scroll saw blades whenever I see them on sale.
__________________
Mark from Illinois

Last edited by weldtoride; 10-07-2017 at 04:43 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-07-2017, 11:57 AM
Murdoch's Avatar
Murdoch Murdoch is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Toronto
Posts: 85
Default

Nice I'll have a look at jigsaw blades today...
__________________
George

Check my Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/george.murdoch.73
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-07-2017, 12:50 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
MetalShaper of the Month October '14 & April '16
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Western Sierra Nevadas, Badger Hill, CA
Posts: 2,761
Default

Mark,
Thank you.
Very good points, as I have cut a lot of 1/8 - and thinner steel sheet using the sabersaws.
Drill 3 close-spaced 1/8" holes to start the cut inside the sheet. Drill two 5/16" holes at opposite corners and cut towards the blank corners for square-ish openings.
As you say so accurately : I always pre-oil the cutline and then feel for the right blade speed. Heat is the enemy of blades.
A sandbag or two on the sheet helps absorb the misc vibes of saw racket and saw chatter.

I used to duct the saw's fan exhaust air with some metalwork and duct tape to blow the chips ahead of my cut - but now chip blowers are included with some, if not all, sabersaws ....

(ps, any time I see a "new" hardware store I go looking at cutting stuff - saw blades of any sort, drills, snips .... you never know until you seek ... )
__________________
Kent

http://www.tinmantech.com

"All it takes is a little practical experience to blow the he!! out of a perfectly good theory." --- Lloyd Rosenquist, charter member AWS, 1919.

Last edited by crystallographic; 10-07-2017 at 12:52 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-08-2017, 09:25 AM
Murdoch's Avatar
Murdoch Murdoch is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Toronto
Posts: 85
Default

Any thoughts on this. Can't seem to upload pic. 14 gauge princess auto metal shear nibbler, it got 4.7 stars out of 5 and 7 good reviews
__________________
George

Check my Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/george.murdoch.73

Last edited by Murdoch; 10-08-2017 at 09:29 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:24 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.