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  #21  
Old 10-09-2017, 02:20 PM
lots2learn lots2learn is offline
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I should have clarified. I am not looking for sweeps. I have access to a waterjet and can make some. Will do when it comes to the roof for my one and only project so far. I am sectioning the body on an 49F1 truck. In two locations at the front of the cab. I dont see how a full set of contour guides would really help me much as I want the full contour in front of the door. Lots of radius change there. I think the contour gauges will be invaluable for matching the left and right sides of the truck.


Fully agree with making your own tools does not always save a bunch of money. Except on my English wheel adjuster. Kerry's method was so simple to make a rock solid adjuster I was done in a couple hours. Zero slop.
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  #22  
Old 10-09-2017, 06:41 PM
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RockHillWill RockHillWill is offline
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I also have access to a friendly water jet guy, but Jimmy Hervatin's price is very favorable, plus you would not have to shop for material, deliver or pick it up.

I also agree that Kerry early upper adjusters were an excellent design, and I built two wheeling machines that used them, but the total cost, if I paid my self for my time, was noticeably less expensive to buy a ready made wheeling machine.

You can PM Jimmy on his earlier post, or perhaps Jimmy can post contact info here.
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  #23  
Old 10-09-2017, 08:39 PM
toreadorxlt toreadorxlt is offline
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I don't always factor the price of paying myself when building machines. I've built my fair share, and will continue to do so.


I've taught myself about machining, tolerances, assembly, CAD design, CAM, all while saving money on a machine. I don't shape professionally, but I justify it by saying its the tuition of self education.

In the end I have about 5k in all my shaping machines, the ticket would be much more elsewhere. (two planishers, wheel, two reciprocating machines)
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  #24  
Old 10-09-2017, 09:37 PM
lots2learn lots2learn is offline
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I will check into Jimmys sweeps.

I made my own wheel with Hoosier profiles upper and lower anvils. A planisher with Ingersoll rivet gun and Hoosier dies. And a Recip machine with Stan Fulton Shrinking dies.

My dad said he thinks I like building tools more than working on the truck! Since im just a hobbiest and overtime is limited it was the only way I was going to get these tools. For a pro charging $100 to $110 per hour a different story.

Like Will I usually advise people to buy vs make. But they dont have access to free cnc machining, 30K+ hrs of CAD and I used work as a CNC programmer. Every case is different.
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  #25  
Old 10-10-2017, 06:40 AM
Rex_A_Lott Rex_A_Lott is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RockHillWill View Post
Guys, many of us have been thru the thinking that 'I can build my own for cheap'. In reality it does not happen that way. Kerry and I repeated this idea when I discovered that you are not always able to build a fabricated wheeling machine for what you can buy one for, especially if you are employed and can earn money during the time that you would spend doing your own work. Long sweeps look impressive, but you are seldom working on panels with a constant radius over long dimensions, and if you do, you can slide the sweeps down the length of the panel. If the panel you are working on has any form of reverse curve, the shorter sweeps work better.

I have a set of the sweeps that Kerry is speaking about and I have seen what Jimmy Hervatin makes. Guys, do yourself a favor and get one of Jimmys sweep sets. They will show up in a few days, while you are busy making money at what you do best!

The do it yourself 'projects' do little more than feed your ego. Buy 'good stuff' from 'good guys' and keep moving! I'm a little embarrassed to reveal how old I was before I started figuring this out. You get what you pay for. 'one-offs' are rarely profitable.

Peter Tommasini makes an excellent set for the pro's, but they are a long way away.
I guess this means I can stop looking for the book "How to build your own metal working machines for fun and profit" by Will Cronkrite.
I think we have all been down that road where we thought we could do it cheaper than we could buy it, but its hard to put a price on being able to say "I did that myself". Not that it means much, but I was impressed at all the machines you built yourself....almost as much as I was at what Peter could do with a hammer and a stump.
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