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  #11  
Old 12-14-2010, 06:14 PM
bobadame bobadame is offline
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Yesterday was in the mid 60s here along the front range of Colorado. Today about 59. I put lots of insulation in the shop. It stays cool in the summer and comes up fast when I turn the heat on. I can gloat because it was an expensive pain in the arse that seemed to take for ever to finish. Glad I did it now but last winter as I was handling all that glass I kept thinking that maybe I should have my head examined. This morning a guy came over and gave me a bid to blow r-38 on top of the r-11 that's in the attic in the house. There is a tax credit and state and federal rebates that will pay for about half of it. I think that time is about to run out on that deal. Worth looking into. I hope to install some hot air solar panels on the south side of the barn before next winter. A couple of PV panels to power some DC muffin fans to blow hot air in during the day. Looks easy to do.

Last edited by bobadame; 12-14-2010 at 06:18 PM.
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  #12  
Old 12-14-2010, 07:16 PM
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HEATNBEAT HEATNBEAT is offline
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It got soooooo cold today in California that I had to put on long pants and a sweat shirt
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  #13  
Old 12-14-2010, 07:35 PM
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Way too cold up here to do anything in the garage for a few months, we're running about -10 C up here tonight (not sure what that is in farenheit), and the cold weather isn't even here yet. Fortunately, my metalshaping shop is in the basement, so I can do pretty much everything but weld without going outside.

Ken
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  #14  
Old 12-14-2010, 08:07 PM
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idickers idickers is offline
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Here in upstate NY it gets pretty cold. My garage is uninsulated, and insulating is at the top of my "project" to-do lists. I have a 4000 W Infratech infrared heater (like they use in outdoor restaurants) mounted on the ceiling over my work area. Throw in a couple of 1000 W halogen work lights, two layers of thermals, and I changed the clutch in my car two years ago when it was 4 degrees. It was kind of like swimming in a very cold lake; hard getting in, but not bad once you were in.

Still gotta insulate. The problem is, when the weather is nice, who wants to work on the garage instead of in it?
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  #15  
Old 12-14-2010, 08:46 PM
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Got the wood stove going... Might use three cord of wood this year...
40'ss when I go into the shop... 70 by lunch..
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  #16  
Old 12-14-2010, 09:24 PM
Peter Miles Peter Miles is offline
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The 3 phase unit heater in my hangar fried a component or two last week. So far the interior temperature hasn't dropped below 50.

My previous industrial electrician retired and left the area so I need to find someone else to fix it. There is no way that I'm going to play with that 70 amp 208V service. Any suggestions for a good electrician for the Everett, WA area?
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  #17  
Old 12-14-2010, 10:34 PM
Johnny Johnny is offline
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Last winter I got to work and one of the doors was left open. Our in floor heat wasn't working and so we were using Herman Nelson heaters. It was -40 that morning and the shop was brutally cold. Needless to say I didn't get much done that day. It's been damn cold so far this year, I try to keep the bay doors closed as much as possible.
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  #18  
Old 12-14-2010, 11:44 PM
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Insulation is the way to go. I keep 1200 sf warm for $60-70 a month with propane ceiling heater. Keep it on low 50's when I'm not working, so everything is fairly warm-bump it up to 65-68 when I go in the shop. Nothing ever rusts, either.

John
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  #19  
Old 12-15-2010, 12:50 AM
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Gene Olson Gene Olson is offline
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5-10degrees F
A couple days ago I went to the PO to ship an order to Finland.
While there, two mormons wearing just suits (said so on their id badges) and 5 monks in saffron robes and sneakers trouped in.
made me cold just looking at em.

The shop is usually at about 50 - 55 though it drops to 40-45 overnight.

I burn wood and only heat half the space.
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  #20  
Old 12-15-2010, 01:33 AM
Peter Miles Peter Miles is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Jordan View Post
Insulation is the way to go. I keep 1200 sf warm for $60-70 a month with propane ceiling heater. Keep it on low 50's when I'm not working, so everything is fairly warm-bump it up to 65-68 when I go in the shop. Nothing ever rusts, either.
John
I agree with both the insulation opinion and with keeping the temperature up. I try to keep above 50 all year long. The biggest reasons are no condensation, no rust or corrosion, no freezing!, no damage to temperature-sensitive paints, liquids, etc.

Additionally, things are comfortable to handle, parts, paint, etc. dries more quickly, etc.

Last, and probably least, since my roof insulation is modest, it provides a minor amount of assistance in helping prevent massive snow accumulations on the roof.
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