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  #11  
Old 11-26-2013, 06:06 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Originally Posted by Frank.de.Kleuver View Post
Sorry guys, but I don't think that the centre of the analysis is if someone is considered a cheapo or that someone doesn't like their eyesight.

Everybody thinks his eyesight is important. Period.
Are people doing stupid things to save money....yes, all the time. Period

I propose that the main analysis should be a technical one only.

As mr Kent states in detail is how he interprets the performance of the dydinium lenses.

What I know is that the TM2000 lenses do work great. I don't tested them for days but I learned welding with them for hours. But I also can say that these dydinium lenses also give a good view of the puddle thru the sodium flare.

What I want to find out is how save these lenses (both Phillips and the TM2000) are to give me a reasonable feeling for safety during OA welding ali. But purely based on scientific details. Both state they are safe and they perform excellent.

I consider myself a scientist but in a different field (electromagnetics). I like to stick to the facts and only try to rely on my feelings to give direction but never to come to a final conclusion.

I did my best to find some technical specs of the dydinium lenses. Maybe someone has more info.

Oh yeahr, I'm cheap also

Grt

Frank
okay, didymium is available in S2 and S3 shades. Welding requires an S5 shade with some blue light protection. The didymium does not have sufficient shading or blue light reduction for welding applications, to my knowledge. I cannot for these reasons recommend to anyone that the didymium is "safe" for welding applications.
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  #12  
Old 11-26-2013, 06:52 PM
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DanGunit DanGunit is offline
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Thank you for doing the research on this, and please continue to look into it. I have been wondering about the efficiency of Didymium glasses for a while now, I have a pair of glasses that I bought from Auralens(sp) when I was a professional glass blower, and they were definately not cheap, about $350.00 10+ years ago. They are very well made, with two layers of Didymium that filter different spectrums, and a shade 5 green welding lens on the lower half of the lens to reduce flare intensity.
The main advantage is that you can work staring directly at the flame through the lower shaded section with high clarity and very low eye fatigue, (I worked 18 hour days for years with no issues or discomfort), then you tilt your head and get a very clean view through the upper plain didymium portion to view detail work while still eliminating the sodium yellow flare.
Anyway, the point of this is that I have been wondering how they would work for aluminum gas welding, but since I tig weld all my aluminum, and that requires a much higher shade, I haven't had a chance to evaluate them for that purpose.

Cheers,
Daniel
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  #13  
Old 11-26-2013, 08:22 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Default didymium glass safety filter for welding

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanGunit View Post
Thank you for doing the research on this, and please continue to look into it. I have been wondering about the efficiency of Didymium glasses for a while now, I have a pair of glasses that I bought from Auralens(sp) when I was a professional glass blower, and they were definately not cheap, about $350.00 10+ years ago. They are very well made, with two layers of Didymium that filter different spectrums, and a shade 5 green welding lens on the lower half of the lens to reduce flare intensity.
The main advantage is that you can work staring directly at the flame through the lower shaded section with high clarity and very low eye fatigue, (I worked 18 hour days for years with no issues or discomfort), then you tilt your head and get a very clean view through the upper plain didymium portion to view detail work while still eliminating the sodium yellow flare.
Anyway, the point of this is that I have been wondering how they would work for aluminum gas welding, but since I tig weld all my aluminum, and that requires a much higher shade, I haven't had a chance to evaluate them for that purpose.

Cheers,
Daniel
I know those glasses because I owned a pair for a while.

I did not like the glassblower's eye-wear, in general because my eyes got tired, itchy and irritated - both from the direct brightness of the O/A flame - and combined with the secondary flame brightness reflected from the aluminum surface.

That secondary brightness was, of course, blocked effectively by the darkened lower half of the "Quartz-working" safety spectacles' lens, the Shade 5 welding filter.... (Pretty neat trick, getting two lens halves stuffed into a plastic safety frame, using just your fingers and a hot salt tray....)
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Last edited by crystallographic; 11-27-2013 at 12:17 AM. Reason: clarity
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  #14  
Old 11-27-2013, 01:39 AM
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Frank.de.Kleuver Frank.de.Kleuver is offline
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Thanks guys,

So when welding for long periods of time one could use three sets of glasses (2 dydinium + 1 blue) simultaneously or the TM2000 lense. Then a single lense is easier.

When welding with shade 3 lenses for short periods of time, one is getting a bit in the twilight zone of things. Or is shade 3 just to low even for short periods. Welding up a panel takes some time.

I can buy a set of older TM lenses second hand. Is there a big difference between a 2013 set of earlier models?

Thanks for the information,

Grt

Frank
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  #15  
Old 11-27-2013, 09:37 AM
Doug M Doug M is offline
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I've (as an adult) always worn safety glasses with sideshields, Z87s now. They have caught 5 projectiles THAT I KNOW capable of taking an eye. I only needed prescriptive lens after I turned 50, but I can still see.

My choice.

I have Dydinium from glassblowing in the 70s and have used them in Aluminum melts with welding goggles and they worked great but now they have no correction...

Thank You for this study I really like the reinforcement in the scientific protection of Eyes. I kind of like seeing. Many jobs I started had no safety glasses requirements I just cannot understand no eye protection or the use of not-proper eye protection.
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  #16  
Old 11-27-2013, 09:46 AM
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Frank.de.Kleuver Frank.de.Kleuver is offline
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I second that.

I've glasses as long as I remember and if you could see the pitting in the lenses because of projectiles hitting it, then wearing glasses is very important. But wisdom comes with the years. I'm wearing safety shields during all kinds of work I do now. But this is only recently

Kind regards,

Frank
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  #17  
Old 11-27-2013, 12:03 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Originally Posted by Frank.de.Kleuver View Post
Thanks guys,



I can buy a set of older TM lenses second hand. Is there a big difference between a 2013 set of earlier models?

Thanks for the information,

Grt

Frank
Hi Frank,
Go get those glasses! No change in production for 20+ years.
You are very welcome.
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  #18  
Old 11-27-2013, 12:10 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug M View Post
I've (as an adult) always worn safety glasses with sideshields, Z87s now.

Thank You for this study I really like the reinforcement in the scientific protection of Eyes. I kind of like seeing. Many jobs I started had no safety glasses requirements I just cannot understand no eye protection or the use of not-proper eye protection.
Hi Doug,
I have spoken to many welders who welded before and during WW2. Many times they had no safety glasses: "could not afford them." I have collected welding safety glasses and goggles from 1914, through the 1920's, 1930's and 1940's. By comparing the then-current eye-wear pricing to the then-current movie ticket pricing, the eye-wear came in at multiples of 25 to 40X movie tickets. That is Expensive. And the safety values were not well understood on top of that. Things have gotten better, in many cases.

Best to wear the safety glasses.
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  #19  
Old 11-27-2013, 02:14 PM
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Kent,
Your historical and scientific findings on eye protection are much appreciated.
Nowadays Movies and Glasses are both expensive.

I started a new thread on Digital Eyewear Lenses..Another vision miricale
http://allmetalshaping.com/showthread.php?t=10168s
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Last edited by Richard K; 11-27-2013 at 02:41 PM.
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  #20  
Old 11-28-2013, 11:45 AM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Originally Posted by Richard K View Post
Kent,
Your historical and scientific findings on eye protection are much appreciated.
Nowadays Movies and Glasses are both expensive.

I started a new thread on Digital Eyewear Lenses..Another vision miricale
http://allmetalshaping.com/showthread.php?t=10168s
Thanks, Richard. I've been teaching and writing this for a longer time than I ever imagined I would.

Yes, the digital eyewear is a very good topic to bring up since it affects or will affect everyone, sooner or later. My vision has always been remarked on by others, reading road signs at long distances and walking safely in the dark - but it does not last forever, sigh.

I should mention also, the eyes' need for liight doubles after the age of 40 and doubles again at 50, and doubles again ... etc. So, with a weld-darkening filter in front of your eyes - after the age of 40 - the need for magnification goes up. Over-magnification might be a necessary consideration when welding. I use 1.5D cheaters in my headgear and I wear 1.5D readers down my nose underneath the goggle, so that if I need more clarity I can tilt my vision down through the added magnification provided by the readers. Sort of like using close-up lenses on the camera - stacking the +1, +2, and +3 lenses in different combinations for the view required - you can vary your own welding magnification when needed, as your available light varies.
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