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Old 02-24-2019, 01:21 PM
BruceConner BruceConner is offline
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Default Wire edge - then bend?

While I would normally say, '"Shape first, then put on the rolled wire edge", this piece (maybe) gives me a choice of putting the wire edge in first with the piece flat, then bending the piece to the contour (bend is in one dimension only). Once it's bent, I'll then put in a joggle on the rear edge, since the joggle seems less likely to put up with bending.

Why am I thinking this way? Well, the bends are rather tight at the corners, and it looked like it might be tough to roll that edge over in that configuration. Then again, it could merely be congenital idiocy on my part

The part in question is the short cowling that surrounds the seat back, as seen in the picture here. What say experts?

SeatDetail.JPG
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Last edited by galooph; 02-24-2019 at 01:29 PM.
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Old 02-25-2019, 11:18 AM
crystallographic crystallographic is online now
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Originally Posted by BruceConner View Post
While I would normally say, '"Shape first, then put on the rolled wire edge", this piece (maybe) gives me a choice of putting the wire edge in first with the piece flat, then bending the piece to the contour (bend is in one dimension only). Once it's bent, I'll then put in a joggle on the rear edge, since the joggle seems less likely to put up with bending.

Why am I thinking this way? Well, the bends are rather tight at the corners, and it looked like it might be tough to roll that edge over in that configuration. Then again, it could merely be congenital idiocy on my part

The part in question is the short cowling that surrounds the seat back, as seen in the picture here. What say experts?

Attachment 51556

Assuming for lack of specifics, that your metal is 3003 .040 and your wire diameter is 5/32, then I would wire it first and then bend it around.
Note: I have made very tightly-radiused wire edges using .050 3003 and 3/16 wire - around 1.5inch dia corners, but I had to hot work the wire and fight the sheet to wrap it nicely ....

By contrast, yours is nice and easy.
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Old 02-25-2019, 01:13 PM
BruceConner BruceConner is offline
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Originally Posted by crystallographic View Post
Assuming for lack of specifics, that your metal is 3003 .040 and your wire diameter is 5/32, then I would wire it first and then bend it around.
Note: I have made very tightly-radiused wire edges using .050 3003 and 3/16 wire - around 1.5inch dia corners, but I had to hot work the wire and fight the sheet to wrap it nicely ....

By contrast, yours is nice and easy.
Thanks Kent!

The material is .063 3003, and the wire is dead soft aluminum about 1/8 or so (don't recall exactly offhand). I've run some tests and it works well on a flat piece, but I had fears about those corners. I am using the bead roller with a tipping die to get the channel folded, then hand hammering a bit to lightly lock in the wire, finishing with a half bead to lock and shape the final edge. It seems pretty tractable if I don't push it too far.
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Old 02-25-2019, 01:18 PM
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Thanks Kent!

The material is .063 3003, and the wire is dead soft aluminum about 1/8 or so (don't recall exactly offhand). I've run some tests and it works well on a flat piece, but I had fears about those corners. I am using the bead roller with a tipping die to get the channel folded, then hand hammering a bit to lightly lock in the wire, finishing with a half bead to lock and shape the final edge. It seems pretty tractable if I don't push it too far.

(I hate soft aluminum wire in wired edges, Sam I Am .... the wire helps stiffen the edge- not just make it rounded on the edge.)
If you want weight savings then use steel fuel line - it's already gun-drilled
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Old 05-20-2019, 12:46 PM
BruceConner BruceConner is offline
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(I hate soft aluminum wire in wired edges, Sam I Am .... the wire helps stiffen the edge- not just make it rounded on the edge.)
Kent, what do you use for your wire when you wire edge? (and where do you get it if it's not commonly available)

-Bruce
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Old 05-21-2019, 02:35 PM
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Kent, what do you use for your wire when you wire edge? (and where do you get it if it's not commonly available)

-Bruce

Hi Bruce,
Since the jobs vary with make, model and year my "standard go-to" big roll of 5/32" workable tinned wire from 40 years ago is not always the correct diameter - so I have to source wire that varies per the job - 1/8" and 3/16" are sometimes needed.
I like using RG45 welding rods, 36" long, and they are available in 5lb boxes.
The flash of copper on them helps prevent rust, so it's cheap, effective and available.
P1170067c.jpg

P1170074c.jpg
Weld ends together for the long lengths
P1170077c.jpg
Hammer until cold for bringing the strength back up
P1170081c.jpg
The arc show an even hardness across the weld
P1120145c.jpg
Making the wire into the rough shape helps, so nice to have uniform strength.
P1120174c.jpg

P1120181c.jpg

P1120187c.jpg

P1120204c.jpg

P1120200c.jpg
Bingity bang. All by hand, on the car or off the car.
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