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  #11  
Old 08-19-2009, 07:49 PM
fordguyfordman fordguyfordman is offline
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Hi Pugsy,

Decent looking? I would be proud to show that off. Nice work as usual.

Tom
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  #12  
Old 08-19-2009, 08:47 PM
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Thanks pugsy

Great thread and I can't wait to see more.
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  #13  
Old 08-20-2009, 05:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SumTingWong View Post
Wow..
That's craftmanship.

BTW- What's the blue tint on the sheet metal as you're finishing it?
Thanks Rob.

I was out sanding the dreaded reverse when I remembered your question.
The blue is from a spray can of machinists/sheet metal layout die. It works quite well as I can spray it on real thin and it doesn't clog up the sandpaper as much as paint guidecoat.
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  #14  
Old 08-20-2009, 05:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fordguyfordman View Post
Hi Pugsy,

Decent looking? I would be proud to show that off. Nice work as usual.

Tom
Thanks Tom.

Remember, pics always look better than close up.
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  #15  
Old 08-24-2009, 11:22 PM
John Buchtenkirch John Buchtenkirch is offline
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Pugsy, NICE JOB, you seem to have those panels flowing nicely. I am going to offer you some suggestions to speed up your work that shouldnít be hard to learn because you already have tig experience from work. First is high speed tig tacking but you need tight fit up of your panels and a tig welder with an adjustable high end setting and a automatic darkening helmet. Set the gas cup right on the panel at a 30 degree angle with the tungsten protruding half way to the panel. Set the high end on your welder between 70 & 90 amps, the exact setting will have to be determined by you after practicing on the same gauge material. Set your tig torch right on the panel using the edge of the gas cup to align the panels (donít forget the previously mentioned 30 degree angle) and the tip of your tungsten should be 1/32Ē offset to the panel split. Now bash the foot pedal all the way down and release it instantly while rotating the tungsten tip 1/16Ē across the panel split and you have your tack with no build up from using a rod and no feeling like you need a third arm and just the smallest HAZ. Giving credit where itís due Fay Butler told me how to do this on the phone and with an hours practice I was doing the same fairly well but you need tight fit up for it to work without a rod. I scribe & cut my panels carefully but if I do go off a little bit I force them together (even if it creates a low spot) and just correct that with my planishing hammer. The same correcting can be done with a hammer & dolly, it just takes longer. Once you get good at this almost robotic operation you will be able to tack as fast as a mig welder and much faster than a gas torch.
Secondly I suggest you buy a tig pen and use it to feed straightened .030 mig wire and just run a continuous bead. You should try to run a fast bead meaning almost a fusion weld but adding a wee bit of that .030 wire when necessary so you end up with almost no bead buildup and a small HAZ. That is what works best & fastest for me , try it on some scrap and see if you can feel comfortable with it, it should save you quite a bit of time over your current method. As a final thought I take a flexible straight edge and scribe across my tacks --- sometimes I have a hard time following my weld line, eyes arenít so good anymore . ~ John Buchtenkirch Name:  #1aaa11aa.JPG
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  #16  
Old 08-25-2009, 01:09 PM
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Thanks John.

I will have to respectably disagree with your tacking theory.
I feel there should be no hurry here. The faster the parts are tacked together, the more time will be required to peen them flush prior to welding.

In the case of my foot pedal ,I don't use one. It would drive me crazy as I zip around with the TIG torch in my hand.

The machine I use at home is a strike start. Simple really. Find somewhere that the seam is touching.
Hit it exactly on the seam at any angle with the cup touching or not and lift up for a brief second and you have a tack. I tack this way with the same amperage as I weld with.

If the fit is not perfect, tack anywhere that is touching and worry about gaps after the 2 pieces are firmly together.

Thanks again,
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  #17  
Old 08-25-2009, 03:12 PM
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Hi Pugsy ,
Nice looking work i'm going to sort o agree with you in that if you have a good fit up of parts have your plant set to the right amps you don't need to use a foot pedal on mild steel just keep your travel speed constant . I have a friend who used to work for rolls royce in their r & d dept as a welder and he is always saying don't use filler unless you really have to , if a job is going to have paint on it then just fussion weld it like you would with o/a , a smear of bondo or lead is the way to go , Don't now that i totally agree with that but it does save a lot of time. Looking forward to seeing more progress when you get it done.

John don't get the tig pen idea I would say it would some what slow you down , looks like you could only have a small amount of filler sticking out the end and as such you would have to keep stopping to pass more wire through it , spend your tea breaks practicing to roll a filler rod through your thumb and first 2 fingers , that way you can use up 34" of a 36" filler rod without having to stop .
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  #18  
Old 08-25-2009, 04:34 PM
John Buchtenkirch John Buchtenkirch is offline
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Thanks John.

I will have to respectably disagree with your tacking theory.
I feel there should be no hurry here. The faster the parts are tacked together, the more time will be required to peen them flush prior to welding.

In the case of my foot pedal ,I don't use one. It would drive me crazy as I zip around with the TIG torch in my hand.

The machine I use at home is a strike start. Simple really. Find somewhere that the seam is touching.
Hit it exactly on the seam at any angle with the cup touching or not and lift up for a brief second and you have a tack. I tack this way with the same amperage as I weld with.

If the fit is not perfect, tack anywhere that is touching and worry about gaps after the 2 pieces are firmly together.

Pugsy, I have to admit Iím not familiar with a ďstrike start welderĒ but if you can do fast tacks (as fast as a mig) without using a rod it sounds fine. I donít quite understand your comment about peening the tacks flush, when Iím done with my fusion tacks they are just about ready to weld without hammering. I usually run a 3Ē pneumatic grinder over them just to knock the edges off the tacks and in my case (old eyes) I scribe across them so I can follow the weld line, a step younger guys donít need. It truly takes me less than 4 or 5 minutes to prepare 3 or 4 feet to weld. On curved parts like that you should just be able to run a fast continues weld with no problem. The idea of welding a little bit, hammering the weld and then welding a bit more is left over from the hammer welding days and in my view neutralizes the speed of the tig. If you run a fast continues tig weld which almost ends up being a fusion weld you should have a smaller HAZ and minimal bead build up which should require less planishing or peening anyway. I just donít know if the strike start welder is capable not having used one myself ? Anyway you are doing fine work there, I surely wasnít knocking it, just trying to turn you onto some ideas that might save you a bunch of time . ~ John Buchtenkirch
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  #19  
Old 08-25-2009, 05:39 PM
John Buchtenkirch John Buchtenkirch is offline
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John don't get the tig pen idea I would say it would some what slow you down , looks like you could only have a small amount of filler sticking out the end and as such you would have to keep stopping to pass more wire through it , spend your tea breaks practicing to roll a filler rod through your thumb and first 2 fingers , that way you can use up 34" of a 36" filler rod without having to stop . fficeffice" />>>
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> >
Chris, itís my fault , I should have posted better photos. The Tig Pen has a little roller that you spin so the wire comes out. Sometimes if I know iím going to do a lot of welding I will straighten out a bunch of pieces of .030 mig wire by pulling it thru the relaxed Z tube with a drill. Sometimes when Iím lazy I just pull 3 or 4 feet thru my fingers to take out 80% of the bend and go with that, it still works fine with the tig pen. Again, Iím really almost running a fusion weld, the wire is just there for any pinholes or slight gaps that turn up. It is my understanding that mig wire has more cleaners in it than any type of wire so itís nice to have it at the ready position so to speak if itís needed. I will just add that Fay Butler is the king of the small HAZ, I stand in awe of his abilities. That is my pinky in the photo of an already planished flat weld sample he sent me in 1992. ~ John Buchtenkirch>>
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  #20  
Old 08-27-2009, 10:31 PM
John Buchtenkirch John Buchtenkirch is offline
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Thanks John.

I will have to respectably disagree with your tacking theory.
I feel there should be no hurry here. The faster the parts are tacked together, the more time will be required to peen them flush prior to welding.

> >
Pugsy, Chris, I guess I should have posted photos to back up what I was saying about high speed tacking so here they are. This isnít something I was reading about or somebodyís theory, itís what I have been doing for maybe 15 years.>>
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> >
No hammering or grinding proud tacks, the only thing I do is run a 3Ē grinder down the seam to get rid of the manufactureís pickling and my tack discoloring and Iím ready to do my final continues weld. The metal in the photo is .039 thick and the tacks were done at 75 amps with a 1/16Ē tungsten, bash the foot pedal down and release instantly. Itís not even welding where you watch a puddle, itís more a robotic technique --- rotate the tungsten across the panel split while the torchís gas cup is sitting on the panel and at the same time bash and release the foot pedal, thatís all there is to it. Once I got the welder set up and figured out my weld heat on some scrap I did all the tacks in the photo in about a minute. I really think anyone with tig experience could pick this up in under an hourís practice, itís just not that hard . ~ John Buchtenkirch >>
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