All MetalShaping

Go Back   All MetalShaping > Metal Shaping Projects > Automotive Projects
  Today's Posts Posts for Last 7 Days Posts for Last 14 Days  

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #111  
Old 08-10-2018, 08:23 PM
Kerry Pinkerton's Avatar
Kerry Pinkerton Kerry Pinkerton is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Near Huntsville, Alabama. Just south of the Tennessee line off I65
Posts: 7,407
Default

Joel, how are you going to address galvanic corrosion?
__________________
Kerry Pinkerton
Reply With Quote
  #112  
Old 08-11-2018, 12:07 PM
heinke's Avatar
heinke heinke is offline
MetalShaper of the Month Jan 2018
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Livermore, CA
Posts: 193
Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerry Pinkerton View Post
Joel, how are you going to address galvanic corrosion?
Kerry: You bring up a very good question. I certainly plan on re-painting the doorposts and cowl prior to completing the car. The two tone nature of the current paint shows there was a color change done on the Corvette that didn't make it all the way into the crevices of the bodywork. In addition, there's a good amount of dirt and debris in the cracks and crevices from years of use the Corvette had.

I hadn't thought much about what type of coating to use on this yet. I'm guessing using something like the spray on Plasti-Dip might provide better adhesion than regular paint for the points where steel and aluminum will be in contact. Maybe some of that LizardSkin sound control product to seal everything up after final assembly. I'm guessing there might even be coatings specifically made for this type of dissimilar metals application.

What specific coatings have you all found to work best?
__________________
Joel Heinke
Be original; don't be scared of being bold!
Reply With Quote
  #113  
Old 08-11-2018, 02:06 PM
Oraclejacket Oraclejacket is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 34
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by heinke View Post
Kerry: You bring up a very good question. I certainly plan on re-painting the doorposts and cowl prior to completing the car. The two tone nature of the current paint shows there was a color change done on the Corvette that didn't make it all the way into the crevices of the bodywork. In addition, there's a good amount of dirt and debris in the cracks and crevices from years of use the Corvette had.

I hadn't thought much about what type of coating to use on this yet. I'm guessing using something like the spray on Plasti-Dip might provide better adhesion than regular paint for the points where steel and aluminum will be in contact. Maybe some of that LizardSkin sound control product to seal everything up after final assembly. I'm guessing there might even be coatings specifically made for this type of dissimilar metals application.

What specific coatings have you all found to work best?
Dissimilar metals? I'd zinc chromate the contact points before assembly. That or use an epoxy primer to prime the contact points, again, before assembly.
__________________
Kyle Boatright
Atlanta, GA
Reply With Quote
  #114  
Old 08-11-2018, 03:17 PM
Rick Mullin Rick Mullin is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Malvern,PA
Posts: 72
Default

I always use an etch prime and a Mylar tape barrier on old coachbuilt Rolls and Ferrari.. To fasten two dissimilar metals, Lamborghini used copper rivets and a flexible urethane caulk ( Miura, Contach and Diablo). It was gray in color. DO NOT use black urethane unless it is aluminum specific. It contains carbon which is a problem. The new aluminum Audis, Ferraris, Lamborghinis and Jaguars use stainless self piercing rivets (SPR). Ferrari used a bi-metallic strip on the 550 and 456 that allowed the steel to be welded on one side and aluminum welded to the other in a lap joint. Hardware on the new alloy cars are Dacromet finished and often go into stainless fasteners. The Audi TT is steel and aluminum using E-coat as a barrier and bonder with the addition of SPRs. I have been away from the new car repair industry for eight years so methods may have changed in that time period.
__________________
Rick
Reply With Quote
  #115  
Old 08-12-2018, 10:34 AM
billfunk29 billfunk29 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 160
Default Dissimilar metals

I have used polysulfide sealer with great success on marine and automotive projects.

https://www.masterbond.com/products/...s-and-coatings
__________________
Bill Funk
Reply With Quote
  #116  
Old 08-12-2018, 11:30 AM
76mx 76mx is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 13
Default

Joel, glad things are coming together well. You are dead on regarding your comments about my construction philosophy. I can only make an educated guess at many things, so let me try to anticipate those things and at the same time do not do anything that might be negative. The speaker holes you mention are a good example. It is just as easy to machine them in, it makes a pretty pattern, and if you do not want them, they will be covered by the rocker, no harm no foul. It was also just as easy to put pilot holes for the standard 6x9 speaker pattern, which are now perfectly located and can be drilled out later for your specific bolt size, or cover them with the rocker as well. Also, Lizardskin is an excellent product but it is a ceramic heat treatment and the other part is a sound deadening. They are excellent materials for their purpose, I use them and recommend them for this chassis, but maybe not for separating dissimilar metals. I had a chance to visit with Marx Henry, the owner of Lizardskin, for some time at the Street Rod Nationals and he has proposed a new project to me. Marx will be here in a few months from Houston and will be staying with me for the Goodguys Show here in Fort Worth. Maybe a seminar for the Forum or something like that about these products during that time would be a good idea.
__________________
Charley Strickland
Reply With Quote
  #117  
Old 08-16-2018, 08:06 PM
heinke's Avatar
heinke heinke is offline
MetalShaper of the Month Jan 2018
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Livermore, CA
Posts: 193
Post Mocking up the doors

With the door posts now in final position, itís time to figure out what can be done to convert the Corvette doors into Miura doors. I want to keep the Corvette door glass and needed to figure out what modification is needed to the electric window regulator to shorten the door height. Hereís the door I have with the window in the down position as a starting point.



Ideally, the door should be shortened by 5 inches with that coming off the bottom side. I came to this number from using the height of the Miura rocker panel that is positioned under the door. From close inspection of the window lift mechanism, I found that 4 inches could be taken off the top mount without disrupting the rivets attaching the guide channels to the frame.

So I removed the window glass and lift mechanism from the door and cut the 4 inches off. Using wood blocks, the lift mechanism was temporarily re-installed and secured enough raise and lower the glass to ensure the door window could be properly aligned to the windshield. Given the vertical guide sits at a slight angle, the lift mechanism needed to be moved rearward about ĺ inch to make up for the 4 inch higher vertical positioning. With this, the side window now closes tightly when raised to the seal on the windshield post.



Next I wanted to see how much of the side window would stay exposed when it was completely lowered. I also wanted to see how much could be taken from the door bottom. I lowered the door glass down till it approached the wood blocks. It turns out the window bottom and lower door hinge bolts are at about the same height. I decided to add some masking tape to give me a sense for the Miura door outline.



All in all, a successful mock-up exercise. It looks like I can easily cut 4 inches from the door bottom. While 5 inches is ideal, my next step will be to get a visual confirmation if 4 inches will be enough. To get the extra inch, the lower door hinge would need to be re-positioned upward and more extensive door window lift modifications would be required. In other words, a bunch of work just to get that next inch. So I think it might just be worthwhile to push the chassis outside for more pictures and Photoshopping to see if an inch shorter rocker panel will work.
__________________
Joel Heinke
Be original; don't be scared of being bold!
Reply With Quote
  #118  
Old 08-19-2018, 08:11 PM
heinke's Avatar
heinke heinke is offline
MetalShaper of the Month Jan 2018
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Livermore, CA
Posts: 193
Post Validating rocker height

My primary objective with this round of Photoshop work was to validate the visual look of the rocker panel height with cutting 4 inches off the bottom of the Corvette door frames. I had marked the door frames with blue masking tape for the photo session so I could use this as a marker for rocker panel placement.

Hereís the resulting mockup. Actual Miura SV on top, my Miura with body work added via Photoshop on the bottom.



Well for one thing, my Photoshop skills are getting better with practice. I went the extra step this time and added wheelbase markers, a neutral background and included the planned Campo wheels in the intended tire height. I also took the photo of my chassis from further back to reduce the fisheye effect and thus give a more accurate placement for wheels and the masking tape door markers.

My conclusion is that the rocker panels at this height look fine. In other words, thereís no need for extra work to give another inch of rocker panel height. I did determine that I hadnít angled the back edge of the doors enough. The bottom rear corner needs to move forward by 2 inches. Iíll make this adjustment to the marker masking tape and verify the door frame will still clear the window glass when fully lowered.

The other thing I added while Photoshopping was a windshield post in the body color with polished trim. This did make a noticeable difference in the visual look. My conclusion from this is that Iíll need to find a way to add a paintable windshield pillar down the Corvette windshield post. The standard Corvette windshield trim is a very narrow strip of blacked out aluminum. Iíll need to figure out a way to replace this with a 1.5 inch wide strip of bodywork with some shiny trim on both sides.

I think Iím starting to capture the Miura look better with this picture but itís still not quite there. I didnít fiddle with it too much to refine the overall look as my real objective was to check the rocker panel height.
__________________
Joel Heinke
Be original; don't be scared of being bold!
Reply With Quote
  #119  
Old 08-20-2018, 06:29 PM
Oraclejacket Oraclejacket is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 34
Default

I still think the B pillar is too high.
__________________
Kyle Boatright
Atlanta, GA
Reply With Quote
  #120  
Old 09-01-2018, 04:43 PM
heinke's Avatar
heinke heinke is offline
MetalShaper of the Month Jan 2018
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Livermore, CA
Posts: 193
Post Front and rear suspension trial fitting

Iíve been working on several Miura project related things simultaneously so none of them has been progressing particularly fast. In other words, Iíve been somewhat challenged in completing any one thing. Today I did however complete the suspension trial fit including the coil over shocks.

So next time I push the chassis out of the garage, I wonít need to prop up the suspension with wood blocks





This picture also shows the tie rod toe adjuster that I changed out. The first one I tried was 6 inches in length but I was a bit nervous that it didnít capture enough threads. So I changed it out with a 7 inch one. I like this a lot better as it captures more threads and still leaves enough open for further toe adjustment down the road.



Iíve also been working on the fuel tank. I should be able to get an update with progress pictures for it soon.
__________________
Joel Heinke
Be original; don't be scared of being bold!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:22 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.