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  #11  
Old 09-04-2018, 06:56 PM
tom walker tom walker is offline
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Bill, I metal finished, polished and buffed the stainless steel skins (.012" thick) on my '37 Ford 1/2 ton. If I can do it anyone can, lot's of patience, lot's of time.
Tom

IMG_20180826_134232.jpg

IMG_20180826_134213.jpg

Last edited by Steve Hamilton; 09-04-2018 at 09:22 PM.
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  #12  
Old 09-04-2018, 09:13 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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Hi,

Thank you for all the responces. I had not heard of using the flat of my hand, towls, leather or tape to help feel the surface better. I will give it a try, on my next project. I will order the clear high spot checker, that Kent had recommended as well.

Bill
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  #13  
Old 09-04-2018, 09:16 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sprint Relic View Post
This is something I have been wondering about, how good is good? I have mostly only seen other peoples metal work in pictures, and they look great. In pictures of my own stuff it looks good, but when I actually look and feel of it in real life it would be good enough for paint but I would not think it would be good enough to polish. I like working with aluminum and my racecar past almost always make me choose to use light (.040) which makes me ask, can you use to thin of metal for a part with lots of shape because lack of thickness for filing versus trying bring every low and high into compliance? Couple of pics visual confusions for me.
First picture before "finishing"
Attachment 48660
After
Attachment 48661
Hi,

I would be curious to see how well the part polishes up. Would you see the little lows in a polished part?

Thx
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  #14  
Old 09-04-2018, 09:26 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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[QUOTE=Peter Tommasini;148725]
Quote:

Both of my repair parts, will be painted again and it is up to the painter guy, to fix if need be.

Bill first of all, let me tell you that you have done extremely well to get that panel to that stage............. I am impressed!
If you need... or like to go further with the finish, this is what I personally would do. Clean the panel from any grease or oil, then wipe or paint some engineering blue on it, use a soft block (not too soft but not hard either) that will allowed you to wrap your hands around the shape, use 120 grit sand paper (DRY)+spread and use soap on the panel , sand the panel down a few square inches at the time, look out, or feel for high spots FIRST! then ..try to elevate the low spots with a polished flipper (not a hammer) by tapping any highs spots down, once that is done simply feel the panel with some masking paper on you hands, that will allow you to feel the most difficult irregularity which are hard to see or otherwise feel. once that is done all over the panel there should be very little blue left on the lows, after this paint the surface again with blue, and do the same thing BUT.... this time use a higher grit paper for example ...240 grit. (It's up to you to decide when to stop) but the same procedure can be done again over and over with higher grit paper till the ally start to shine. By the pics you have the panel in pretty good shape, there is no need to use a file at any time
IF any panel like that was to be polished (not painted) I would strongly suggest to make a new one, simply because of the time factor to repair it to that standard, plus you need to keep in mind the thickness of the metal, the unwanted holes you would need to fix, corrosion etc ...In another words it be quicker to make a new one, and by keeping your top wheel and lower anvils clean at all time with acetone, by the time the panel is finished it will be 90% polished
Peter
Thanks Peter,
For the finish work, you recommend using a polished flipper, to knock down the highs. Would you support the back side, while using the flipper.

I'm making the same nose bowl for another customer, this is why I have a buck. But like any job, it is a matter of what a customer is willing to spend (new verse used).

Cheers,

B
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  #15  
Old 09-04-2018, 09:31 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billfunk29 View Post
I am curious where powder coating fits in the finishing spectrum? I assume you can't use filler because of the heat. And like wise the heat may produce warpage. I would think it is more forgiving than a polished part though.
Hi,

We have powder coated aircraft parts in the past, with little issue. For us, it depends on the application. We will powder coat items that are not essential for flight. We don't want a crack to develop do to vibration or age and be missed at an inspection, because of the thickness of the coating.

The coating looks nice, but never as flat as a automotive painted surface.

B
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  #16  
Old 09-04-2018, 09:33 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom walker View Post
Bill, I metal finished, polished and buffed the stainless steel skins (.012" thick) on my '37 Ford 1/2 ton. If I can do it anyone can, lot's of patience, lot's of time.
Tom

Attachment 48665

Attachment 48666

Thank you for sharing, you did a very nice job. I think I have to work on my patience
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  #17  
Old 09-04-2018, 11:26 PM
Peter Tommasini Peter Tommasini is offline
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[QUOTE=BTromblay;148757]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Tommasini View Post

Thanks Peter,
For the finish work, you recommend using a polished flipper, to knock down the highs. Would you support the back side, while using the flipper.

I'm making the same nose bowl for another customer, this is why I have a buck. But like any job, it is a matter of what a customer is willing to spend (new verse used).

Cheers,

B
Bill..........
Yes......... for sure, but use a dolly that is very comparable with the shape, and try to lift the lows (if any ) next to any high by simply rolling the dolly away from the high spots, but if you feel that there is no major lows, then simply take the high down with the flipper without support and keep rubbing with the block, the blue color on the job will help you look and feel the over all shape
Peter

[Quote]

I'm making the same nose bowl for another customer, this is why I have a buck. But like any job, it is a matter of what a customer is willing to spend (new verse used)

That is also very true BUT... sometime repairing an old piece full of unwanted holes ,oxidation, old repairs, welded cracks (especially if they where tig) etc...
then the panel needs some filler work etc.. that can take more time than making a new panel
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Last edited by Peter Tommasini; 09-04-2018 at 11:39 PM.
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  #18  
Old 09-05-2018, 10:16 AM
Sprint Relic Sprint Relic is offline
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[QUOTE=Peter Tommasini;148760][QUOTE=BTromblay;148757]
Bill..........
Yes......... for sure, but use a dolly that is very comparable with the shape, and try to lift the lows (if any ) next to any high by simply rolling the dolly away from the high spots, but if you feel that there is no major lows, then simply take the high down with the flipper without support and keep rubbing with the block, the blue color on the job will help you look and feel the over all shape
Peter

Quote:

I'm making the same nose bowl for another customer, this is why I have a buck. But like any job, it is a matter of what a customer is willing to spend (new verse used)

That is also very true BUT... sometime repairing an old piece full of unwanted holes ,oxidation, old repairs, welded cracks (especially if they where tig) etc...
then the panel needs some filler work etc.. that can take more time than making a new panel
What are your thoughts on on raising lows by dollying the back and tapping (off dolly) around the lows? I seem to be able to do this some what with diminishing returns. I'm not giving advice, I'm asking.
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  #19  
Old 09-05-2018, 10:19 AM
Sprint Relic Sprint Relic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom walker View Post
Bill, I metal finished, polished and buffed the stainless steel skins (.012" thick) on my '37 Ford 1/2 ton. If I can do it anyone can, lot's of patience, lot's of time.
Tom

Attachment 48665

Attachment 48666
Awesome work Tom!
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  #20  
Old 09-05-2018, 06:47 PM
Peter Tommasini Peter Tommasini is offline
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[Quote]

What are your thoughts on on raising lows by dollying the back and tapping (off dolly) around the lows? I seem to be able to do this some what with diminishing returns. I'm not giving advice, I'm asking.

Skip Wilson

Yes that is good way as well, I like to use this method at the very beginning of the repairs , it's a way to avoid any unnecessary stretching from the start
Peter
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Metalshaping tools and dvds
www.handbuilt.net.au

Metalshaping clip on youtube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEAh91hodPg

Making Monaro Quarter panel:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIpOhz0uGRM
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