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  #21  
Old 04-08-2018, 11:27 AM
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Thank you both for your input and feedback. Weíve got the discs that Marcus linked to coming our way. Iíll keep updated as I try them out eventually.

John thatís also very interesting and odd to hear about your situations with the heat of the sun affecting the two different types of repairs differently.
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  #22  
Old 04-10-2018, 05:35 AM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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I have never seen movement like described by John and get the full range of temperatures in the shed as get sometimes over 40*C in there and worse as the cab is under clear roofing panel. No roof insulation apart from some foil paper. I have found that you must not just stop when you have the shape right, but also the right tension in the panel. I will use the shrinker top and bottom until the panel is no longer loose, even with the right shape in it.
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  #23  
Old 04-10-2018, 07:27 AM
Marc Bourget Marc Bourget is offline
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Marcus,

I don't recall use of the term "loose" do you mean something like oil canning, or?

Thanks
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  #24  
Old 04-10-2018, 09:14 AM
John Buchtenkirch John Buchtenkirch is online now
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When you hold the shrinking disc flat on the panel (about Ĺ of the disc touching) it searches out the high spots and letís say for example heats 5 to 15 of them in one shot with lows remaining cool. So while it doesnít shrink as much as one torch spot overall it shrinks more accurately if that makes any sense . I usually do my major shrinking with a torch and then fine tune it with the disc where it saves me a good amount of time. I prefer the Scott Knightís style disc without the so called safety edge because itís more flexible and conforms better to the panel but I had to retrain myself not to lift the disc off the panel until it stopped turning. ~ John Buchtenkirch
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  #25  
Old 04-10-2018, 10:59 PM
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John, thanks for your explanation on your shrinking method. That certainly makes sense to me.


The past couple days have been spent removing some of the remaining components in the dash (speedo and steering wheel and column) I also unbolted the front fenders, hood, and grille / front panel and set them aside in preparation for gutting the uni-body out of the car! Basically I want is the roof, door openings (A & B posts), rockers, exterior quarter skins, rear body / tail light panel and dash for the most part. Everything else must go so I can fabricate fresh to fit our needs and desires.

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With the doors and all the front exterior sheet metal removed, you can see the uni-body construction remains.

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A view from the front showing the under structure.

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Here I've begun cutting off the passenger front "snout"

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Here the full front clip has been cut free.

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In order to gain some room to work, I cut the middle of the main floor out. No actual structure was removed yet. The sub-rails along the rockers are still there as well as the cross member brace.

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The same was done in the trunk. Just the sheet metal, the sub-rail structure is left along for now.

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Once I had the floors cut away I was able to gain better access to add the temporary bracing inside to hold the body in alignment. After the bracing was added it was safe to start removing the actual uni-body "structure" this included the cowl / firewall and the sub-rails along the rocker panels.

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A view in the door. I'm still working my way back and need to remove the rear inner quarters and wheel wells as well as the rear sub-rails yet.

Currently everything was rough cut out with the torch & plasma. I will now get ready to carefully disassemble back to the necessary seams or joints (drilling out spot welds, etc.)

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The growing pile of scrap!
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  #26  
Old 04-11-2018, 05:15 AM
Gojeep Gojeep is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Bourget View Post
Marcus,

I don't recall use of the term "loose" do you mean something like oil canning, or?

Thanks
Not enough to hold a different shape like a oil can, but the amount of deflection when you press on the panel. A 'loose' panel will deflect more and feels 'soft'. Hope that makes sense?
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  #27  
Old 04-11-2018, 07:48 AM
cliffrod cliffrod is online now
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Dane, during this deconstruction stage you left the windshield installed. Was that done deliberately to help keep the body, windshield frame/channel and such in alignment or just incidental to this part of the process?
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  #28  
Old 04-11-2018, 08:01 AM
route56wingnut route56wingnut is offline
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Dane I hope you can attend our Spring event . You are doing nice work and would fit right in with this crowd
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  #29  
Old 04-11-2018, 10:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffrod View Post
Dane, during this deconstruction stage you left the windshield installed. Was that done deliberately to help keep the body, windshield frame/channel and such in alignment or just incidental to this part of the process?
Iíd be lying if I said I left it in there for a specific reason....just procrastinating about removing it!ha Though, as you mentioned, it possibly helped maintain a bit of rigidity before the bracing was installed.
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  #30  
Old 04-13-2018, 08:05 PM
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Well it's been a couple more days of "deconstruction" certainly no metal shaping going on yet, but these are all important tasks none the less.

I rough trimmed some more out of the cowl and finally trimmed all the inner quarters, wheel wells and rear sub-rails from the body.

After everything was rough cut out the weather was beautiful here so I took advantage and set the body outside to sandblast all the structure since we are possibly supposed to get some snow in the double digit depths this weekend. The sheet metal I'll eventually blast with crushed glass as it's very easy on the panels.

Once blasted, I was able to see the factory seams / spot welds and carefully drill them out to remove the previously rough torch cut panels back to the factory seams.

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I've finished rough trimming the top of the cowl out. I've basically just left the exterior wiper portion remaining.

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With the inner quarters and wheel wells removed I had good access to scrape away the thick old undercoating.

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A view from the trunk with all the inner structure removed.

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A view through the windshield with all the inner structure removed.

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Took advantage of the nice weather and sandblasted all the structure inside and out except for the roof skin (inside and out) quarter panels (inside and out) rear panel below the decklid (inside and out) and the top of the dash.....those panels I'll blast with crushed glass in the near future.

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The 60 year old body is in pretty decent shape overall. Here is an example of some rust on the top of the wiper / cowl panel and door post.

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The other side is not as bad, but will still need the same areas fabricated and replaced eventually.

Other areas of rust (on the body) are:

~Front and rear portion of the passenger rocker panel
~Front edge of the quarter panel at the rocker joint
~Both quarter panel tops under the rear side glass and along the trunk
~Under the driver tail light.

Overall....not too bad. Certainly not in the grand scheme of things. I'm not certain about the doors / fenders yet.

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Drilling out the spot welds for the floor to rocker panel seam.

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Here the floor seam is completely removed from the rocker panel. Pretty certain they used enough spot welds on the car!

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Drilling out and separating the cowl from the inner door post structure.

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A pile of the scrap "edges" as I worked my way around the vehicle and all the joints / seams.

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In this picture you can see some significant damage to the passenger rocker panel as well as the rust at the front I mentioned (the rear has rust holes as well)

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Unfortunately, with that damage to the rocker as well as the rust I've decided I'll need to remove the inner structure inside the rockers. This will give me good access to repair the damage, it will also allow me to completely sandblast the inside of the rocker panels to completely rid them of any rust (and possibly expose more) and lastly will give me good access to front and back side for welding in patch panels for the rust.
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Last edited by pplace; 04-13-2018 at 08:27 PM.
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