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  #21  
Old 09-05-2018, 07:59 PM
crystallographic crystallographic is offline
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Default powder coat metal quality

Quote:
Originally Posted by billfunk29 View Post
I am curious where powder coating fits in the finishing spectrum? I assume you can't use filler because of the heat. And like wise the heat may produce warpage. I would think it is more forgiving than a polished part though.

Hi Bill,
I don't like powder coat for any metal less than .063 - too much variation from the heat cycles.
I do use epoxy filler and sand that. And the coater can apply a primer that can be sanded, though their sanding is not likely to be very scientific/method-driven.
I have to get the metal very good before powder prime, sand, and powder coat - but not as good as doing polished work ...
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  #22  
Old 09-06-2018, 12:00 AM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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[QUOTE=Peter Tommasini;148760][QUOTE=BTromblay;148757]
Bill..........
Yes......... for sure, but use a dolly that is very comparable with the shape, and try to lift the lows (if any ) next to any high by simply rolling the dolly away from the high spots, but if you feel that there is no major lows, then simply take the high down with the flipper without support and keep rubbing with the block, the blue color on the job will help you look and feel the over all shape
Peter

Quote:

I'm making the same nose bowl for another customer, this is why I have a buck. But like any job, it is a matter of what a customer is willing to spend (new verse used)

That is also very true BUT... sometime repairing an old piece full of unwanted holes ,oxidation, old repairs, welded cracks (especially if they where tig) etc...
then the panel needs some filler work etc.. that can take more time than making a new panel

Hi,
It make sense, will give it a try.

Thanks
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  #23  
Old 10-14-2018, 04:21 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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Thank you for all the responses, it helped a lot. This is the finished part, all gas welding was done with Oxy/Hydrogen. The material is 3003 x .040" thick and the gas welding went very well. I welded closed the extra holes from rivet on patches with great success.
1.jpg
2.jpg

A general rule for aircraft work, is not to remove more than 10% of the base material during a repair. This rule applies to treating corrosion or surface damage "scratches". 10% of .040" is .004" so I had to be mindful of this when I dressed down the weld. A great thing with gas welding is how easy it is to get full penetration compared to TIG welding. I was able to body file down the weld and damaged areas and not remove more than .002" to .003" and I'm not worried about cracks in my weld once the part is in service. My friend, Jack Charles stopped by the shop yesterday and he is a autobody/paint guy. He thought the finished surface was a very paintable surface. I'm still trying to learn how much metal work, verse paint shop work needs to be done.
3.jpg
4.jpg
I have to make a new one now for another customer. Repairing this one, helps build my confidence, I cant wait.

Thanks for looking,

Bill
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  #24  
Old 10-15-2018, 02:46 AM
Stretch Stretch is offline
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Great result Bill - it looks really good!
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  #25  
Old 10-15-2018, 03:40 PM
dwmh dwmh is offline
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Yes excellent result Bill. You need a lot of patience for metal finishing.
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  #26  
Old 10-15-2018, 10:21 PM
fred26t fred26t is offline
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Default Metal finish...

I have had some really good results on steel with a friction disk. The say the disk work as good on aluminium but I have not tried, especially on .040. Fred26t
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  #27  
Old 10-15-2018, 10:49 PM
steve.murphy steve.murphy is offline
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I saw someone here made a shrinking disc from wood to be used on aluminum to minimize marking.
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  #28  
Old 10-15-2018, 10:59 PM
BTromblay BTromblay is offline
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Hi,

I use a shrinking disk from time to time on aluminum. To prevent surface damage, I coat the disk and surface with soap. It still marks the surface, but good results. I have switched over to a wood shrink disk, that works very well and tool mark free. It takes a little longer to get the same amount of shrink, but worth it.

B
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