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  #181  
Old 01-03-2019, 03:56 PM
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heinke heinke is offline
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Post Radiator coolant tubes (cont.)

I finished fabricating and welding up the front cooling tubes.



A final check to ensure the coolant lines will clear the spare tire. There’s still an inch to spare

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  #182  
Old 03-27-2019, 06:19 AM
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Originally Posted by heinke View Post
I finished fabricating and welding up the front cooling tubes.



A final check to ensure the coolant lines will clear the spare tire. There’s still an inch to spare

I almost start a thread asking if anyone ever tried to build or may be just restoring a miura. You have an interesting project. Hope to see the body panel being hand fabricate.
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  #183  
Old 03-27-2019, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Manza View Post
I almost start a thread asking if anyone ever tried to build or may be just restoring a miura. You have an interesting project. Hope to see the body panel being hand fabricate.
Manza: I do plan to hand fabricate an aluminum body for this Miura. That was the main driver in me taking on the project. Here's the current state for the bodywork tooling...



Yes, that's the station buck all cut out but not yet assembled. I've been spending my garage time on finishing up my long overdue Ferrari GTO project so the Miura is on the back burner for the next month or so. I'm anxious to get back on it as all the metal polishing and other tedious finish type details on the GTO just isn't as much fun to me as shaping up body panels.

If you're interested in a Miura restoration, Richard Mullins has one underway. He's been very generous to me in providing various chassis and body measurement for the early planning stages of my Miura project.
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  #184  
Old 08-09-2019, 11:59 AM
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Default Miura station buck

In case you missed it, I posted an update with the front clip station buck here: http://www.allmetalshaping.com/showp...4&postcount=36
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  #185  
Old 08-09-2019, 01:01 PM
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Post Mounting Miura Pedal Assembly

While the Ferrari GTO was out getting the headliner installed, I had the chance to work on the Miura a bit. I had purchased the brake/throttle pedal assembly prior and now I wanted to get it mounted in the chassis. I had first gone down the path of using a pedal assembly where the pedals hang down and master cylinders are mounted up top. I found the clearances were just too tight with the cowl and steering column to make it work as I wanted it too.

So I switched directions to using a floor mounted pedal assembly that uses master cylinders with remote reservoirs. This way, I could make the pedal assembly adjustable for tall people like me or for people with normal length legs. The remote reservoirs are needed as the master cylinders are located below the plane of the brake calipers and the reservoirs need to be placed above the plane of the calipers to prevent unwanted fluid drain back.

I mounted the pedal assembly to a ¼” thick aluminum plate. For adjustment, a series of holes spaced ¾” apart were drilled in the plate. The pedals now have 3 ¼” of adjustment by unfastening, moving, and re-fastening the 4 bolts that secure the plate.

Pedal assembly as viewed from above.



As viewed from driver’s seat.



As advertised by Charley Stickland, his chassis does have lots of leg room. With the pedals now mounted in place, my long legged, 6’5” body fits well with plenty of legroom!
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  #186  
Old 09-24-2019, 05:32 PM
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Post Locating and Fabricating Flip Front Clip Hinge Point

I decided to start building out the sub-structures that attach and hold body panels to the chassis. I’m starting with the one piece, flip-up front clip first. The front clip is hinged in the front and thus tilts forward to open. When opened, the bodywork that forms the top of the nose comes very close to touching the ground. Because of this, determining the hinge point location is critical.

I needed to know the front bodywork outline in order to measure backward to the hinge point. So with measurements taken from station buck, I used a piece of welding rod and masking tape to lay the outline. It also shows where the horizontal chassis tubes are too long and need to be cut off so they won’t protrude through the bodywork.



Through some research and experimentation, I concluded the hinge point needed to be vertically about an inch lower than the front wheel spindle and horizontally about 10 inches behind the most forward part of the front bumper. I located this spot and marked it with an X on some masking tape. By putting in some angled chassis bracing members, it would give a strong hinge point and complete the chassis bracing in that area.



I plan to use ½” bolts for the front clip hinges themselves. So I inserted some aluminum inside the rectangular tube to make it solid at the hinge point and drilled ½” holes. To ensure the holes on both sides aligned, a piece ½” tube was used to fixture them in place for tack welding.



After tacking the cross brace tubes in place, the horizontal chassis tubes were trimmed to length.



I’m going to hold off on final welding the cross brace tubes in place until I’ve built out more of the front clip sub-structure and can physically verify the hinge point placement.
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  #187  
Old 09-25-2019, 05:26 AM
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Good to see you back on the chassis again.
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  #188  
Old 09-25-2019, 10:07 AM
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Again you are doing construction in the correct order. Too many people would have put the buck together and immediately started making aluminum panels without thinking of what they mount to or how they will function ala hinges, opening and more once actually installed. Progress is good!
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  #189  
Old 09-27-2019, 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Superleggera View Post
Again you are doing construction in the correct order. Too many people would have put the buck together and immediately started making aluminum panels without thinking of what they mount to or how they will function ala hinges, opening and more once actually installed. Progress is good!
Mark: thanks for confirming my build sequence is correct.
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  #190  
Old 09-27-2019, 03:40 PM
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Post Flip Front Clip Hinges

Next up on the build agenda was to make the flip-up front clip hinges. I wanted to have both vertical and horizontal adjustment in the hinges so it took some thinking to design that in. I started with a piece of 2 ¼” x 2 ¼” x ¼” angle in 6061 aluminum, 6” in length as the main part of hinge. This was then cut down so a 1 ½” wide rectangular tube for sub-structure base could bolt up to it.



I put slots in the angle part of hinge where 5/16” bolts pass through for horizontal adjustment and vertical adjustment if via shim. For fabrication purposes, there’s a ¼” thick shim in the hinge for now. I’ll likely put some lightening holes in the hinge to shed some of its weight. The sub-structure members will be welded to the rectangular tube bolted to the hinge top.
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